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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 1985 | PAUL FELDMAN, Times Staff Writer
A Los Angeles gang member was convicted Thursday of four counts of first-degree murder in the mistaken-identity shootings of four relatives of retired professional football star Kermit Alexander. Horace Burns, 20, sat motionless as the jury--which must next decide whether Burns receives the death penalty or life in prison without possibility of parole--announced its verdict to Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Aurelio Munoz.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
April 23, 2014 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON - Victims of child pornography whose images of sexual abuse have circulated on the Internet may claim damages from every person caught with illegal images, the Supreme Court ruled Wednesday. But justices rejected the idea that a single person who possesses such images may be assessed the full amount due to the victim, setting aside a $3.4-million verdict against a Texas man in a favor of a woman whose childhood rape was photographed and widely circulated on the Internet.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 1989
I think it's time for the people of Orange County to wake up. Orange County Sheriff Brad Gates has finally had a verdict rendered against him for violating the civil rights of a political rival by using sheriff's investigators to harass him. It's unfortunate, however, that the blame lies on Brad, yet the burden once again will fall on county taxpayers. (In 1987 Orange County bailed Gates out in a related matter to the tune of $375,000.) What's even more distressing is the attitude of some prominent people around the community.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 2014 | By Christie D'Zurilla
Chris Brown is looking at another tortuous cross-country trip back to Los Angeles, courtesy of the U.S. Marshals Service, followed by months more in jail, courtesy of the guilty verdict in his bodyguard's Washington, D.C., assault case.  Brown, who's also charged with assault related to an October 2013 incident in which a man alleges he was hit by both men while trying to get into a picture with two women outside the singer's tour bus, had his...
BUSINESS
January 9, 2014 | By Stuart Pfeifer
A woman has filed suit against McDonald's Corp., saying she was burned by hot coffee that spilled on her at one of the fast-food chain's Los Angeles restaurants. The lawsuit comes 20 years after a jury awarded $2.9 million to a woman who was badly burned after she spilled hot coffee into her lap at a McDonald's in Albuquerque. That verdict was widely criticized and became a rallying cry for advocates of legal reform. A judge later reduced the verdict to $640,000 and the case settled out of court for an undisclosed amount.
NEWS
March 20, 2013 | From Times Staff
On the 18th day of deliberation, the jurors in the Bell corruption trial said today they have reached a verdict in the case against six former council members accused of misappropriating public funds. More soon.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 15, 2013 | By Ruben Vives and Robert J. Lopez
Protesters denouncing the George Zimmerman trial verdict stormed Interstate 880 near downtown Oakland Monday evening and blocked traffic before lanes were cleared a short while later. The California Highway Patrol said traffic was blocked "due to police activity" and urged motorists to use the 580 Freeway as an alternate. Images posted on Twitter showed people dashing across the busy freeway amid oncoming vehicles. LIVE BLOG: Ongoing coverage of Crenshaw protest The CHP reported about 7:45 p.m. that all northbound and southbound lanes were cleared and that the protesters had moved to surface streets.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 15, 2013 | By Andrew Blankstein, Robert J. Lopez and Ruben Vives
Los Angeles police officers and protesters denouncing the George Zimmerman verdict were playing a cat-and-mouse game Monday night as chaos continued along Crenshaw Boulevard and police declared an unlawful assembly. The unlawful assembly was declared shortly before 10 p.m. Earlier, groups of young people were running along area streets as officers responded to hot spots and set up skirmish lines to try to contain the roaming bands. Groups of people stampeded through Leimert Park, where a peaceful rally took place Monday evening before groups of youths splintered off and began engaging in lawless actions.
OPINION
July 18, 2013
Re "Heartsick and numb over the Zimmerman verdict," Column, July 16 Congratulations to Sandy Banks for standing her ground. It would have been so much easier to write whatever column she said she had prepared to write. But she didn't. Banks says what needs to be said. Regardless of the merits of the case against George Zimmerman, in this country it's still dangerous - more accurately, deadly - for a young black man to be walking where he's not wanted. Thanks to Banks for standing her ground - that grounded place of bearing witness and saying what needs to be said, even if it's not popular.
SPORTS
July 19, 2013 | By Melissa Rohlin
Charles Barkley has never been one to shy away from controversy, and on Thursday he weighed in with his opinion on the George Zimmerman verdict. “Well, I agree with the verdict,” Barkley told CNBC. “I feel sorry that young kid got killed, but they didn't have enough evidence to charge him. Something clearly went wrong that night - clearly something went wrong - and I feel bad for anybody who loses a kid, but if you looked at the case and you don't make it - there was some racial profiling, no question about it - but something happened that changed the dynamic of that night.” Barkley added that because of the lack of evidence, he doesn't think that Zimmerman should go to jail "for the rest of his life.
NATIONAL
April 23, 2014 | By Jenny Deam
In a landmark legal victory that centered on fracking, a middle-class north Texas ranching family won nearly $3 million from a big natural gas company whose drilling, they contend, caused years of sickness, killed pets and livestock, and forced them out of their home for months. Tuesday's $2.95-million civil verdict by a six-person Dallas jury is thought to be the first of its kind in the nation. Other landowners have sued over drilling and reached settlements, but legal experts think this is the first jury verdict.
NATIONAL
March 26, 2014 | By Tina Susman
NEW YORK--The conviction of a former Al Qaeda spokesman Wednesday for crimes stemming from the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks could bolster calls for the movement of high-profile terror suspects out of Guantanamo Bay to civilian courts, but the defendant's attorney said the trial was unfair and promised an appeal. After a jury found Sulaiman Abu Ghaith guilty, defense attorney Stanley Cohen said his case had been hampered by the absence of certain witnesses whose testimony was not allowed; by the judge's instructions to the jury; and by U.S. District Judge Lewis A. Kaplan's own statements as jurors entered a second day of deliberations.
NEWS
March 11, 2014 | By David Lauter
WASHINGTON -- After a deluge of television ads, robocalls and mailers fueled by more than $12 million in campaign spending, only one thing is certain about today's special congressional election in Florida: The results will be over-interpreted. Public polls have shown Democratic candidate Alex Sink clinging to a very small lead over Republican David Jolly. But as of Monday, with more than 125,000 mail-in ballots and early votes cast - probably 60% to 70% of the total vote - registered Republicans have outnumbered registered Democrats by a little more than 5,000 voters.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 2014 | By Jean Merl
State Sen. Roderick D. Wright's sentencing on felony convictions has been postponed two months, until May 16, the Los Angeles County District Attorney's Office confirmed Friday. Deputy Dist. Atty. Bjorn Dodd said Wright's defense attorney has asked for transcripts of all the trial testimony and those won't be ready until the middle of next month. Wright attorney Winston Kevin McKesson said Friday he needs the transcripts to prepare post-trial motions he will submit for Judge Kathleen Kennedy to consider.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 2014 | By Christie D'Zurilla
The family friend who piloted a personal watercraft in the July 2012 boating accident that killed Usher's stepson Kile Glover was found guilty in Atlanta on Thursday of homicide by vessel and several related charges.  Jeffrey Simon Hubbard was also found guilty of serious injury by vessel, reckless operation, unlawful operation of personal watercraft and a boat traffic violation,  according to the Atlanta Journal-Constitution. Kile, the 11-year-old son of Tameka Foster Raymond and Atlanta television executive Ryan Glover whom Usher had reportedly raised like his own since age 4, was floating with a 15-year-old girl on a towed inner tube when they were hit by Hubbard's watercraft on July 6, 2012.
NATIONAL
February 15, 2014 | By Michael Muskal
The jury in the murder trial of Michael Dunn, accused of shooting an unarmed teenager to death during a dispute over loud music, has reached verdicts on four charges but said on Saturday it could not agree on the top count of first-degree murder. The jury, which is in the fourth day of weighing Dunn's fate, announced its status in a note to  Judge Russell L. Healey late Saturday afternoon. The judge read the jury the so-called dynamite charge, urging them to return to their deliberations and try to resolve their differences.
OPINION
July 19, 2009
In introducing Judge Sonia Sotomayor as his first nominee to the Supreme Court, President Obama said that she satisfied three criteria: a rigorous mastery of the law, a recognition that judges "interpret, not make, law," and an understanding, rooted in experience, of how ordinary people live. If there were any doubts about that characterization, they were dispelled by the nominee's impressive performance last week at her confirmation hearings before the Senate Judiciary Committee.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 2013 | By Robert Faturechi
Protesters took to the streets in San Francisco on Saturday night to rally against a Florida jury's acquittal of George Zimmerman in the shooting of Trayvon Martin. An official with the San Francisco Police Department estimated that about 200 people had gathered in the city's Mission District, and officers had been called out to the scene. “We haven't been notified of any disturbance,” said the officer, who refused to give his name because he did not have an official statement.
NATIONAL
February 15, 2014 | By Michael Muskal
A jury in Florida returned a split verdict in the case of Michael Dunn, accused of killing an unarmed teenager in a dispute over loud music - a decision that will put the software engineer in prison for the rest of his life but leaves unanswered lingering questions about race, guns and self-defense law. In its fourth day of deliberation Saturday, the jury convicted Dunn, 47, of four charges. But the jury, which included two African American women, one Latino man, an Asian American woman and eight white people, couldn't reach a decision on the charge of first-degree murder in the killing of Jordan Davis, who would have celebrated his 19th birthday Sunday.
NATIONAL
February 14, 2014 | By Michael Muskal
The Florida jury weighing the fate of Michael Dunn, accused of shooting an unarmed teenager to death during a dispute over loud music, told officials Friday that it had hit a wall in its deliberations and then broken for the night. Deliberations were to resume Saturday morning. Jurors have deliberated for more than 181/2 hours since receiving the case Wednesday afternoon. On Friday, the jury asked the judge whether it could hand in a verdict on some charges even if it could not reach a unanimous agreement on one charge.
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