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Verdicts

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 9, 2013 | By Jeff Gottlieb and Ruben Vives
L.A. County Dist. Atty. Jackie Lacey said prosecutors will seek the maximum sentence against Angela Spaccia, the former Bell official convicted Monday on 11 counts of misappropriating public funds and other corruption charges. Prosecutors said Spaccia faces a prison term of more than 10 years. Deputy Dist. Atty. Sean Hassett said he thought Spaccia would receive a sentence similar to the 10 to 12 years L.A. Superior Court Judge Kathleen Kennedy said she would give former city manager Robert Rizzo.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 9, 2013 | By Jeff Gottlieb
The jury has reached a verdict in the trial of Angela Spaccia, the former Bell assistant city administrator accused of public corruption. Court officials said the jury would be read as soon as the defendant and prosecutors were gathered in the courthouse. Spaccia is being tried on 13 counts of felony corruption, including misappropriation of public funds. Prosecutors contended she and her boss, Robert Rizzo, raided the town's treasury by giving themselves huge salaries and extraordinary retirement benefits even as the city was starting to run out of money.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 9, 2013 | By Jeff Gottlieb and Ruben Vives
Angela Spaccia, the $564,000-a-year deputy to the disgraced former city manager of Bell, was found guilty Monday of 11 felony counts related to her role in the corruption scandal, becoming the seventh official convicted of enriching themselves at the expensive of the working-class residents. Spaccia, the last figure in the Bell scandal to be convicted or enter a plea, was taken away in handcuffs after a jury rendered the verdicts in a downtown Los Angeles courtroom. Though she wept several times during her testimony, Spaccia showed no emotion when the verdicts were read, pronouncing her guilty of multiple counts of misappropriation of public funds, conflict of interest and secretion of public documents.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 2013 | By Richard Verrier
SAG-AFTRA and Writers Guild of America, West are backing actor Junie Hoang's appeal of the verdict in her age discrimination lawsuit against the entertainment industry website IMDb. In 2011, Hoang sued IMDb and its parent company Amazon in federal court, alleging they improperly disclosed her age in her profile on the website. In April, a jury ruled in favor of IMDb and found that the company did not violate its privacy policy in connection with Hoang, who is appealing the ruling on the grounds she did not get a fair trial.
AUTOS
October 25, 2013 | By Jerry Hirsch
Facing the potential of paying millions of dollars in punitive damages after losing an Oklahoma sudden acceleration lawsuit, Toyota Motor Corp. quickly reached a settlement with the plaintiffs. On Thursday, an Oklahoma City jury found that faulty electronic systems in a Camry sedan caused it to accelerate out of control and crash, killing one woman and injuring another. The jury ordered Toyota to pay $1.5 million in compensatory damages to the driver of the vehicle, Jean Bookout, and an additional $1.5 million to the family of Barbara Schwarz, who was killed in the crash.
AUTOS
October 25, 2013 | By Jerry Hirsch and Ken Bensinger
Toyota Motor Corp.'s first loss in a sudden acceleration case, in an Oklahoma courtroom this week, could embolden attorneys nationwide who are looking to bring hundreds of similar cases. Worse for the Japanese automaker, the verdict centered on the company's electronics, which have been a focus for plaintiffs seeking to prove safety defects in the company's cars. Toyota on Friday confirmed that it had reached a confidential settlement in the lawsuit, which involved the fatal 2007 crash of a Camry.
AUTOS
October 24, 2013 | Ken Bensinger and Jerry Hirsch
An Oklahoma City jury has found that electronic defects in a Toyota Motor Corp. vehicle caused it to accelerate out of control and crash into a wall, killing a passenger and seriously injuring the driver. The verdict, handed down late Thursday, requires Toyota to pay a total of $3 million in compensatory damages to Jean Bookout and the family of the deceased passenger, Barbara Schwarz. They were the sole occupants of a 2005 Camry that crashed in Eufaula, Okla., in September 2007.
BUSINESS
October 23, 2013 | By Andrew Tangel
NEW YORK - Bank of America has been found liable for fraud in the sale of faulty loans by its Countrywide mortgage unit, a major victory for the federal government as it continues to pursue cases stemming from the financial crisis. A federal jury in Manhattan sided with prosecutors who alleged Countrywide Financial Corp. churned out risky home loans in a process called "the Hustle" and then sold them to mortgage giants Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac. The Calabasas company, once considered the crown jewel of American mortgage lending, made big profits unloading loans that were later rendered worthless during the housing crisis in 2008.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 2013 | By Abby Sewell and Robert Faturechi
A federal jury has found Los Angeles County Sheriff Lee Baca personally liable in a case involving abuse of an inmate in the Men's Central Jail, meaning the sheriff could be required to pay $100,000 out of pocket. It is the first time a jury has held Baca personally at fault in a deputy use-of-force case. Sheriff's officials called the verdict a "huge mistake" and said they would appeal. Plaintiff Tyler Willis filed a federal civil rights lawsuit in October 2010 against L.A. County and several deputies and sheriff's officials, alleging that deputies severely beat him in 2009 while he was a 23-year-old inmate awaiting trial on charges of lewd acts with a child.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 3, 2013
Discuss the Michael Jackson trial verdict with Times reporter Jeff Gottlieb at 9 a.m. On Wednesday, a Los Angeles jury found that concert promoter   AEG Live   was not liable for the death of  Michael Jackson , capping a marathon civil trial that laid bare the troubled singer's health problems, struggles with drugs and fateful attempt at a comeback tour. The verdict came four years after Jackson received a fatal dose of an anesthetic from his doctor as he was about to launch a concert series produced by AEG aimed at reviving his stalled career.
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