Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsVerdicts
IN THE NEWS

Verdicts

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 3, 2013 | By Ari Bloomekatz
Conrad Murray, the physician convicted in the death of Michael Jackson, said from jail Thursday morning that he broke into tears after Wednesday's verdict in a lawsuit in the case. "My immediate reaction was one of tears; certainly, I cried," Murray said in an  interview from jail on NBC's "Today. "   In Wednesday's conclusion of the lawsuit, filed by Jackson's family against concert promoter AEG Live, a jury decided that AEG was not responsible for the pop star's death.  The jury also found that Murray had been competent to serve as the pop star's physician, but members of the panel  said after the verdict that they don't believe that vindicates him in the death.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 3, 2013 | By Jeff Gottlieb
Michael Jackson's mother may have lost her main chance at holding AEG Live liable for her son's death after a jury on Wednesday sided with the concert promoter in a widely watched lawsuit, but an attorney for the family said all options remain on the table. After the verdict was read in a downtown Los Angeles courtroom -- clearing AEG Live of liability in the 2009 death of Michael Jackson a few weeks before his 50-concert London comeback was to begin -- Katherine Jackson looked ahead stoically.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 2013 | By Jeff Gottlieb
The jury in the Michael Jackson case has reached a verdict in the wrongful-death case against concert promoter AEG Live. The verdict will be read at 3:30 p.m. Pacific time and broadcast live.  Jackson's mother and three children brought the lawsuit, saying AEG Live hired and supervised Conrad Murray, the Las Vegas doctor who gave the singer a fatal dose of a powerful anesthetic while he was rehearsing for 50 sold-out concerts in London, with...
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 2013 | By Randy Lewis
Wednesday's verdict absolving concert promoter AEG Live of responsibility for Michael Jackson's untimely death in 2009 while preparing for what was to be a major career comeback raises the question of whether the spotlight will ever return to the superstar's musical legacy, one that yielded, among many other achievements, “Thriller,” the biggest selling album by a solo artist in history. Will Jackson's legacy be inextricably intertwined with the sad and often tawdry details of his personal life after his star went into decline, and the seemingly endless legal battles related to his death?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 2013 | By Jeff Gottlieb, Ruben Vives, Victoria Kim
Entertainment giant AEG Live scored a major win in the Michael Jackson case after a Los Angeles jury unanimously decided that the concert promoter was not liable in the singer's death.   The jury -- which found that AEG hired Dr. Conrad Murray and that he was a competent doctor -- did not award any money to the singer's mother Katherine Jackson or his three children. They had been seeking damages of more than $1 billion. It took only three days for the jury to reach the verdict after a five-month trial that included dozens of witnesses.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 2013 | By Jeff Gottlieb, Victoria Kim, Ruben Vives, This post has been corrected. See the note below for details.
The jury in the Michael Jackson case found that Dr. Conrad Murray was competent to serve as the pop star's physician, but they said after the verdict that they don't believe that vindicates him in the death. "There are really no winners in this," jury foreman Gregg Barden said. "Somebody had to die for us to be here.… It was really a tragic situation. " Valerie Wass, Murray's appellate attorney, said the verdict wouldn't help the physician's appeal of his involuntary manslaughter conviction, but it may help "in the court of public opinion.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 2013 | By Jeff Gottlieb, Ruben Vives, Victoria Kim, This post has been corrected. See the note below for details.
A Los Angeles jury on Wednesday found that concert promoter AEG Live was not liable for the death of Michael Jackson, capping a marathon civil trial that laid bare the troubled singer's health problems, struggles with drugs and fateful attempt at a comeback tour. The verdict came four years after Jackson received a fatal dose of an anesthetic from his doctor as he was about to launch a concert series produced by AEG aimed at reviving his stalled career. Jackson's family filed the lawsuit, claiming that AEG's was to blame for the King of Pop's death because it was negligent in the hiring and supervising of the doctor, Conrad Murray.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 2013 | By Victoria Kim, Ruben Vives and Jeff Gottlieb
For the dedicated Michael Jackson fans who came to the trial day after day, the singer still could do little wrong. They wore T-shirts expressing their love for the singer and their support for his aged mother. One fan even brought a bouquet of red roses to give Katherine Jackson and her attorneys. So when the judge announced Wednesday that jurors had decided AEG Live was not responsible for Jackson's death, they weren't just stunned, they were angry. They didn't understand how a five-month trial that seemed to expose the concert promoter as caring little about the singer's well-being could end this way. "My heart is broken," said Barbara de L'Orme, 42. "This was the greatest artist that we ever had, and they treated him like this.
SPORTS
September 28, 2013 | Bill Dwyre
Another night of boxing, more controversy. The sport currently comes with an odor. Even more than usual. Julio Cesar Chavez Jr., more famous by birth than achievement, won a 10-round unanimous decision Saturday night at StubHub Center. He beat Bryan Vera of Austin, Texas, who had been put in the ring as a steppingstone opponent for bigger, more lucrative paydays in boxing's suddenly attractive middleweight divison. The decision was booed heartily by the crowd. It came in the immediate aftermath of the controversial draw scoring by Nevada judge C.J. Ross in the obvious, one-sided Floyd Mayweather Jr.-Saul "Canelo" Alvarez match.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 23, 2013 | By Jeff Gottlieb
After nearly five months of testimony, much of it focused on the mental and physical health of one of the world's most celebrated entertainers, the Michael Jackson wrongful death case moved closer to a verdict Monday as the judge read her instructions to jurors. The Jackson family's attorneys will give their closing arguments Tuesday, followed the next day by lawyers for concert producer and promoter AEG. On Thursday, the Jacksons' lawyers will do their rebuttal. After that, the case will be in the hands of the jurors.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|