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BUSINESS
April 19, 2003 | From Associated Press
The Bush administration is siding with the recording industry in its court fight to force Internet providers to disclose the identities of people who are illegally trading songs over the Web. A Justice Department brief, filed Friday in U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia, supports the effort by the Recording Industry Assn. of America to force Verizon Internet Services Inc. to identify a subscriber suspected of offering more than 600 songs from well-known artists.
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BUSINESS
March 3, 2007 | James S. Granelli
About 20,000 Verizon high-speed customers lost their Internet connections for 11 hours when a router malfunctioned during a routine upgrade. The outage, which began about 2 a.m., affected digital subscriber line, or DSL, customers from Long Beach and Whittier to San Clemente, said Jonathan Davies, a spokesman for Verizon Communications Inc. The router, he said, had to be wiped clean of data and reloaded, and the system was back up at 1:10 p.m.
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BUSINESS
March 3, 2007 | James S. Granelli
About 20,000 Verizon high-speed customers lost their Internet connections for 11 hours when a router malfunctioned during a routine upgrade. The outage, which began about 2 a.m., affected digital subscriber line, or DSL, customers from Long Beach and Whittier to San Clemente, said Jonathan Davies, a spokesman for Verizon Communications Inc. The router, he said, had to be wiped clean of data and reloaded, and the system was back up at 1:10 p.m.
BUSINESS
April 19, 2003 | From Associated Press
The Bush administration is siding with the recording industry in its court fight to force Internet providers to disclose the identities of people who are illegally trading songs over the Web. A Justice Department brief, filed Friday in U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia, supports the effort by the Recording Industry Assn. of America to force Verizon Internet Services Inc. to identify a subscriber suspected of offering more than 600 songs from well-known artists.
BUSINESS
October 5, 2002 | JON HEALEY and JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In a strategic shift, the major record labels want to expand their fight against online piracy by going after people who use file-sharing networks to copy songs for free. The problem is, they don't know who those people are. And Internet service providers, which do know, don't want to tell. A federal judge in Washington on Friday began deliberating how hard it will be for the labels to ferret out the identity of Internet users accused of violating copyrights.
BUSINESS
January 22, 2003 | Jon Healey, Times Staff Writer
Ruling that there is no right to anonymity when sharing music online, a federal judge Tuesday ordered the Internet unit of Verizon Communications Inc. to reveal the name of a customer accused of piracy by the Recording Industry Assn. of America. The decision, which Verizon plans to appeal, is a boon not only to major record labels but also to Hollywood studios, book publishers, video game developers and other copyright holders whose works are copied freely online. U.S. District Judge John D.
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