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BUSINESS
February 11, 2011 | By David Sarno, Los Angeles Times
Verizon put Apple Inc.'s iPhone on sale Thursday, and at least some people showed up to buy it. The 20 people lined up at Verizon's marquee Burbank store were a far cry, however, from the hundreds that often throng Apple's retail stores in anticipation of new products. Reports from around the U.S. suggested that lines were substantially shorter for the Verizon iPhone than they had been when the latest version of the phone debuted for AT&T customers in July. Still, Brett Rarick and Joey Jepson, both 20, arrived at the Burbank store at 3:30 a.m. to claim their spots at the head of the line.
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BUSINESS
September 23, 2008 | From Times Wire Services
Verizon Wireless, the second-largest U.S. mobile-phone company, will offer month-to-month contracts that don't have cancellation fees, a bid to attract customers wary of long-term commitments. Monthly subscribers will pay the same rates as those with long-term contracts, though they won't get discounts on new handsets, a Verizon spokeswoman said. Verizon and larger rival AT&T Inc. faced criticism from lawmakers and consumers who said fees for canceling contracts early were too high.
BUSINESS
November 5, 2008 | Times Wire Services
The Federal Communications Commission, kicking off a new round of telephone-industry consolidation, approved Verizon Wireless's $28.1-billion purchase of Alltel Corp. and a deal between Sprint Nextel Corp. and Clearwire Corp. The commission voted 5 to 0 to give conditional clearance to the Alltel acquisition, requiring Verizon to sell network operations in 105 markets where its service overlaps with Alltel's. The FCC also voted unanimously to support Sprint's plan to merge a high-speed wireless network with Clearwire.
BUSINESS
December 11, 2008 | from times wire services
The Federal Trade Commission has removed the last regulatory hurdle for Verizon Wireless' purchase of Alltel Corp., which will create the country's largest wireless carrier, the agency said. The FTC's antitrust regulators approved an early termination of their antitrust review, indicating that they had no objections. The Federal Communications Commission and the Justice Department have signed off on the deal, with conditions that included the sale of some service areas. Verizon Wireless is paying $5.9 billion and assuming $22.2 billion of Alltel's debt.
BUSINESS
May 15, 2008 | From Times Wire Services
Verizon Wireless is backing a free operating system that competes with programs from Microsoft Corp., Google Inc. and Qualcomm Inc. and expects it to become the "preferred" software on its network. It's the first U.S. cellphone company to join the LiMo Foundation, which aims to unite handset makers, software companies and carriers on a software platform that will make it easier and cheaper to create a wide variety of phones. Verizon's endorsement is an important boost to the stature of LiMo, or Linux Mobile, in the U.S. LiMo already has the backing of large Asian and European carriers, as well as such handset makers as Motorola Inc., Samsung Electronics Co. and LG Electronics Inc.
BUSINESS
August 23, 2011 | David Lazarus
Rising prices, lower quality, less convenience — consumers can put up with a lot. But one thing I've consistently heard from people is that they won't stand for lousy service. And I can understand why. There's just no excuse for businesses treating customers like unwanted dinner guests, tapping their corporate feet until the annoyance goes away. It's a symbiotic relationship. We need businesses to provide the stuff we want. But they need us just as much to buy their stuff.
BUSINESS
April 30, 2009 | TIMES WIRE REPORTS
Verizon Wireless has held talks with Microsoft Corp. about offering a handset that may include the Zune music-player software, a person familiar with the matter said. The phone may be introduced next year, said the person, who declined to be identified because the talks are in the early stages. Verizon is also talking with Apple Inc. about selling a version of the iPhone, potentially giving the carrier access to the best-selling consumer handset, the person said.
BUSINESS
April 12, 2013 | By Salvador Rodriguez
The Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival starts Friday, and that means hundreds of thousands of smartphone users will descend on Indio. And when you get that many people in one location, there's bound to be some connectivity issues. That's why the four major wireless carriers say they're going out of their way to make sure there is enough network capacity for their customers to make calls, send texts and upload photos and videos to their social networks. Verizon, AT&T, T-Mobile and Sprint understand that at events such as Coachella -- where as many as 90,000 people may show up on one day -- users see just how good their networks are, and perhaps more important, how well their friends' carriers hold up. PHOTOS: The top smartphones of 2013 AT&T, for example, said it will be using all 18 beams of its super multi-beam antenna.
BUSINESS
June 15, 2008
The argument advanced in David Lazarus' June 8 column ("A telecom line we've already heard," Consumer Confidential) is flawed in its attempt to illustrate a parallel between the not very competitive cable business with that of the hyper-competitive wireless business. You would have been more accurate to compare Verizon Wireless' proposed merger with Alltel to Verizon's previous wireless mergers. After all, Verizon would not be Verizon if not for many successful combinations. The merger of Bell Atlantic's wireless business with that of AirTouch and GTE in 2000 created Verizon and, soon after, many benefits for consumers, including nationwide coverage.
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