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ENTERTAINMENT
November 24, 2013 | By Irene Lacher
Teller, the usually silent half of the renegade magician duo, Penn & Teller, recently perched on a couch at the Geffen Playhouse, where he had a lot to say about two projects he has helmed as director - "Play Dead," magician Todd Robbins' one-man creep show, which runs through Dec. 22 at the Geffen's Skirball Theater, and "Tim's Vermeer," about inventor Tim Jenison's quest to unearth the Dutch painter's techniques and re-create his work in a Texas warehouse....
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 2014 | By David Ng
The subject of the documentary "Tim's Vermeer" isn't Johannes Vermeer, the 17th century Dutch artist renowned for his luminescent paintings. The true protagonist of the movie is Tim -- Tim Jenison, that is -- an unassuming computer engineer from Texas who embarks on a journey to upend the way we think about Vermeer and his masterpieces. Jenison believes the Dutch artist used a clever contraption of mirrors to aid in the creation of his paintings. Jenison's attempt to replicate Vermeer's "The Music Lesson" using such a device forms the backbone of the documentary, which opened in December for an awards-qualifying run and is back in cinemas starting Friday.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 2004
I've been deeply inspired by Mark Swed's article ("The Sound of America," Jan. 25) lauding modern composer John Cage and his "4'33"," four minutes and 33 seconds of total silence, as "an extraordinary experience."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 2014 | By Betsy Sharkey
If you missed the very fine, fine-art documentary "Tim's Vermeer" during its brief stop last month, it is back in town for its official run. Director Teller (better known as the droller half of the ironic comedy/magic team Penn & Teller) follows inventor Tim Jenison's journey to understand how the 17th-century painter Johannes Vermeer tripped the light so fantastically. A tale of art and obsession unfolds as Jenison experiments with various optical techniques Vermeer might have used to achieve his luminous interplay of light and shadow.
OPINION
December 11, 2001
Re "A Dutch Treat for LACMA," Dec. 7: Why am I not surprised that the board of trustees of LACMA has decided to throw away $200 million more? After all, the history of LACMA is filled with dunderheaded decisions: Let's build beautiful reflecting pools without realizing what the bubbling tar underneath will do to them; let's tear out the reflecting pools and replace them with the concrete monstrosity that is the Anderson Building and completely close...
ENTERTAINMENT
September 1, 2013 | By Susan King
It's a hectic week for James Franco. But then again, what week isn't? On Saturday, Franco premiered his latest directorial effort, "Child of God," at the Venice International Film Festival, and on Sunday he was back on the red carpet there for the screening of "Palo Alto," Gia Coppola's film in which he stars. Then on Labor Day evening, Comedy Central is airing its roast of the actor/director/poet/artist/novelist that was taped on Aug. 25. PHOTOS: Fall movie sneaks 2013 And on Friday, the Playhouse West Film Festival is presenting "An Evening with James Franco and Jim Parrack" as its opening-night event at the El Portal Theatre in North Hollywood.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 30, 2007 | Greg Braxton; Lynn Smith
Felicia Pearson Actress seasoned by the streets Felicia Pearson didn't grow up with dreams of becoming an actress. She was too busy living the thug life on the streets of Baltimore. Dealing drugs as a gun-slinging teen constantly put her in harm's way, and she eventually wound up in prison for killing a woman in self-defense. Those troubled days are still vivid for the 27-year-old Pearson.
BOOKS
March 5, 2006 | Shelley Jackson, Shelley Jackson is the author of "The Melancholy of Anatomy," "Patchwork Girl" and "Skin," a story published in tattoos on the skin of 2,095 volunteers. Her first novel, "Half Life," is due out in July.
WHEN I was an art student, all Sturm und Drang and torn fishnets, Lawrence Weschler's "Seeing Is Forgetting the Name of the Thing One Sees," a study of Los Angeles artist Robert Irwin, inspired me to tape a number of long pieces of yarn between my bed, desk, floor and ceiling. As I recall, I was interested in defamiliarizing the relationship between my body and my room.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 28, 2013 | By Jamie Wetherbe
The Norton Simon Museum will soon add a Goya to its collection,  if only temporarily. The Pasadena institution announced Wednesday that it will exhibit “Don Pedro, Duque de Osuna,” a large-scale portrait by the 18th-century master Francisco de Goya y Lucientes,  for roughly three months beginning in December. The 1790s portrait, on loan from the Frick Collection in New York through an exchange program, joins three other Goya paintings and one drawing in Norton Simon's permanent collection.
BOOKS
August 20, 2000
1 WINTER SOLSTICE by Rosamunde Pilcher (St. Martin's Press: $27.95) On the shortest day of the year, five people find themselves in a house in Northern Scotland learning to live with loss. Last Week: --; Weeks on List: 1 2 PURPLE CANE ROAD by James Lee Burke (Bantam: $24.95) While helping out an old friend, a man discovers that his mother was murdered by cops 30 years ago .
ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 2013 | By Glenn Whipp
"Blackfish," "20 Feet From Stardom" and "Tim's Vermeer" are among the 15 films that have made the Oscar shortlist for documentary features, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences announced Tuesday.  Members of the documentary branch narrowed the field from a record 151 qualified entries, selecting an excellent group of films that also included Sarah Polley's acclaimed family investigation "Stories We Tell" (which took the nonfiction prize...
ENTERTAINMENT
November 24, 2013 | By Irene Lacher
Teller, the usually silent half of the renegade magician duo, Penn & Teller, recently perched on a couch at the Geffen Playhouse, where he had a lot to say about two projects he has helmed as director - "Play Dead," magician Todd Robbins' one-man creep show, which runs through Dec. 22 at the Geffen's Skirball Theater, and "Tim's Vermeer," about inventor Tim Jenison's quest to unearth the Dutch painter's techniques and re-create his work in a Texas warehouse....
ENTERTAINMENT
September 1, 2013 | By John Horn
TELLURIDE, Colo. -- Tim Jenison makes it very clear in the beginning of the Telluride Film Festival documentary “Tim's Vermeer” that he is not an artist. He's a desktop-video inventor, the founder of a hardware and software company called NewTek. But Jenison is as fascinated by art as he is by technology, and not that long ago he began to wonder if modern machinery in its more nascent forms might have been employed by painters centuries ago. PHOTOS: Fall movie sneaks 2013 So he began an experiment that at first seemed both inspired and insane: to use rudimentary devices to paint the 17 th century masterpiece “The Music Lesson” by Johannes Vermeer just as he imagined the Dutch artist had. “At the face of it that seems almost impossible,” Jenison says of his painting plans in “Tim's Vermeer, “ which is having its world premiere in Telluride.  “Because I am not a painter.” The film, directed by the magician Teller in his feature-film debut, is a fascinating exploration of how Vermeer might have used lenses and mirrors to master the representation of light and perspective.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 1, 2013 | By Susan King
It's a hectic week for James Franco. But then again, what week isn't? On Saturday, Franco premiered his latest directorial effort, "Child of God," at the Venice International Film Festival, and on Sunday he was back on the red carpet there for the screening of "Palo Alto," Gia Coppola's film in which he stars. Then on Labor Day evening, Comedy Central is airing its roast of the actor/director/poet/artist/novelist that was taped on Aug. 25. PHOTOS: Fall movie sneaks 2013 And on Friday, the Playhouse West Film Festival is presenting "An Evening with James Franco and Jim Parrack" as its opening-night event at the El Portal Theatre in North Hollywood.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 28, 2013 | By Jamie Wetherbe
The Norton Simon Museum will soon add a Goya to its collection,  if only temporarily. The Pasadena institution announced Wednesday that it will exhibit “Don Pedro, Duque de Osuna,” a large-scale portrait by the 18th-century master Francisco de Goya y Lucientes,  for roughly three months beginning in December. The 1790s portrait, on loan from the Frick Collection in New York through an exchange program, joins three other Goya paintings and one drawing in Norton Simon's permanent collection.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 2013 | By Jori Finkel, Los Angeles Times
Guards accompany them when they travel. Crowds flock to them when they arrive. Johannes Vermeer's exquisite paintings of young women in gleaming domestic settings are the vigilantly watched and amply insured celebrities of the museum world, promising not only a glimpse of extraordinary beauty but big crowds as well. Now two of Vermeer's luminous women are making rare appearances in California. PHOTOS: Arts & culture by The Times "Girl With a Pearl Earring" from 1665, a popular painting even before the Tracy Chevalier novel and Scarlett Johansson movie of the same name, went on display last month at the De Young Museum in San Francisco.
NEWS
December 27, 1995 | Washington Post
The National Gallery of Art will dip into private funds to reopen the much-heralded Johannes Vermeer exhibition--and only the Vermeer exhibition--for a week, starting today. The about $30,000 needed to keep 25 guards on the job for a week, normally provided by federal funds, will be paid from the gallery's Fund for International Exchange. Because of the partial government shutdown, nearly all federally funded museums have been closed to the public.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 1999 | RICHARD S. GINELL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
If you've been playing as a group for 30 years, the chances are pretty good that you will develop a unified sound, which the Vermeer String Quartet certainly has done. It is a polished, homogenous, nearly seamless blend that is also a little bland, or at least that's how it sounded in the wide spaces of the Los Angeles County Art Museum's Bing Theatre Wednesday night.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 2008 | Suzanne Muchnic
In 1995, when the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., rounded up 21 of the 35 paintings known to have been made by 17th century Dutch artist Johannes Vermeer, the show was billed as a once-in-a-lifetime event. About 4,000 people filed into the specially ticketed exhibition each day -- until a partial government shutdown, caused by a budget disagreement between President Bill Clinton and the Republican majority in Congress, forced the gallery to close.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 2008 | Martin Rubin, Special to The Times
When IT comes to forgery and its ability to fascinate, the bigger the better, and the greater the audacity the more compelling. In the story of a two-bit Dutch painter, Han Van Meegeren, who had the nerve to take on that most rarefied of his artistic compatriots, Johannes Vermeer, author Edward Dolnick has hit the mother lode. And as if this tale of unparalleled chutzpah were not good enough, it takes place amid the tumult of the Nazi occupation of Holland and the competitive plunder of its -- and much of Europe's -- art treasures by Adolf Hitler and Hermann Goering.
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