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NEWS
June 5, 2011
Graveyards aren't your typical tourist attraction, but this one drew the attention of Colleen Riemer. Last year the West Covina resident was in Pomfret, Vt., where she visited her best friend's childhood home – which happened to be across the street from a cemetery. "The shadows cast from the tombstones and the parting storm clouds in the distance caught my eye, and since I've always enjoyed photographing graveyards, I just had to get some shots," Riemer said. She used a Nikon CoolPix S3000.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 2014 | By Ben Welsh and Thomas Suh Lauder, Los Angeles Times
Crime reports are up significantly for the latest week in four L.A. neighborhoods, according to an analysis of LAPD data by the Los Angeles Times' Crime L.A. database . Three neighborhoods reported a significant increase in violent crime. Reseda (A) was the most unusual, recording seven reports compared with a weekly average of 2.3 over the last three months. Vermont Knolls (D) was the lone neighborhood with a property crime alert. It recorded 22 property crimes compared with its weekly average of 12.5 over the last three months.
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NATIONAL
March 29, 2012 | By Tina Susman
A snowplow driver and newspaper deliveryman who wanted to "get a girl" and his wife allegedly lured a Vermont teacher from her home under the guise of needing help, then strangled her and weighted her body with cinderblocks before tossing it into a river, police say. The murder of the popular prep school teacher, Melissa Jenkins, 33, who was a single mother to a 2-year-old, has stunned the small Vermont town of St. Johnsbury, about 70 miles south...
NEWS
November 5, 2013 | By Laura E. Davis
The Illinois Legislature sent a bill to the governor Tuesday that would make the state the largest in the heartland to legalize gay marriage. And Gov. Pat Quinn has pledged to sign it. The House passed the bill Tuesday, 61 to 54, according to the Associated Press. The bill first passed the Senate in February and passed in the upper chamber again Tuesday after it was amended. Under the measure, gay couples could begin getting married in Illinois in June. PHOTOS: Californians celebrate gay marriage ruling In the Midwest, Minnesota and Iowa already allow gay marriage.  The 12 other states in the U.S. that have OKd same-sex unions are California, Connecticut, Delaware,  Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Rhode Island, Vermont and Washington.
NEWS
August 1, 2012 | By Adam Tschorn
Ursa Major, a year-and-a-half old men's skincare line based out of Stowe, Vt., serves up a suite of four products that will leave your face feeling like it's just been on a brisk walkabout in the Green Mountains. The brand, which was among the crop of made-in-America labels on hand at last week's Launch LA trade show, was founded by Oliver Sweatman and partner Emily Doyle, with a shaving cream in December 2010. (He co-founded the Sharp's men's grooming brand back in 2002 and her background includes a stint with Bumble and Bumble .)
NEWS
March 6, 2012 | By David Meeks
Mitt Romney won the Vermont primary, the Associated Press projected, easily beating Rick Santorum and Ron Paul in a New England state that borders Massachusetts, where Romney served as governor. It's Romney's second prize of Super Tuesday, after Virginia was also called in his favor. Vermont was called based on exit polls, which projected a double-digit margin for Romney. Paul and Santorum were closely matched for second place. Based on early returns, Romney, Paul and Santorum stood to collect delegates in Vermont.
TRAVEL
April 8, 2012 | By Mike Ives, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Wallace Stegner wrote books about the American and Canadian West, so it's understandable that people consider the longtime California resident a Western author. Stegner, a prolific novelist, essayist, conservation advocate and professor at Stanford University, was born in 1909 in Iowa and grew up in Utah and Saskatchewan, Canada. Today he is chiefly remembered for his fictional portraits of steely homesteaders and his musings on the American wilderness. But Stegner lived in Vermont most summers from the late 1930s until his death in 1993, and he considered the small Vermont village of Greensboro his home away from home.
OPINION
March 10, 2006
Re "Vermont Town Votes to Impeach President," March 8 One question: Where do I sign up? TODD KOERNER Hermosa Beach
ENTERTAINMENT
July 21, 2007 | From Reuters
In the Vermont town of Springfield nestled in a mountain valley, a banner decorated with images of pink doughnuts is festooned across Main Street, welcoming visitors to the "Home of the Simpsons." "We're all very proud," said longtime resident Judi Martin, 56, after the town of whitesteepled churches, historic homes and aging brick factories was named the official hometown of television's favorite dysfunctional family.
NEWS
September 10, 1987 | United Press International
A dust-filled antique grain elevator exploded and burned on Burlington's lake front today, spewing smoke laden with cancer-causing asbestos over one-fourth of Vermont's largest city. More than 100 firefighters from three cities extinguished the fire in five hours at the five-story elevator, built around the turn of the century, but smoke wafted over the populous southern section of the city.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 14, 2013 | By Michael Finnegan
A 16-year-old boy was struck and killed by a car Friday night in a hit-and-run outside a South L.A. church where he had just attended a meeting of a youth group, authorities said. Police were searching Saturday for the driver of the white Nissan Maxima that hit Nathaniel Mota, a teenager whose family had long been active at the church, Iglesia Catolica Santa Cecilia on South Normandie Avenue near West 42nd Street, they said. But police had no description of the suspect, Officer Rosario Herrera said.
NATIONAL
June 7, 2013 | By Devin Kelly
Vermont has become the latest state to remove criminal penalties for the possession of small quantities of marijuana with legislation signed into law.   Civil fines will replace criminal penalties for possession of up to an ounce of marijuana or 5 grams of hashish. “This change just makes common sense,” Vermont Gov.   Peter Shumlin   said in a statement after signing the legislation on Thursday. “Our limited resources should be focused on reducing abuse and addiction of opiates like   heroin   and   meth   rather than cracking down on people for having very small amounts of marijuana.” Possession under the age of 21 will be treated the same as underage possession of alcohol -- a court referral for a first offense, possible civil penalties and/or license suspension, and criminal penalties for a third offense.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 2013 | By Robert J. Lopez
The Red Line Vermont-Santa Monica station has been reopened after being temporarily closed Tuesday night while police investigated an assault. Red Line trains had been bypassing the station, Metro said on its Twitter account. The Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department's transit detail, which patrols the subway, said an assault occurred on the rail platform, and that it was closed while deputies gathered evidence.  Officials said two people were arrested in the matter, and that one victim suffered cuts during a confrontation at the station.
NATIONAL
May 20, 2013 | By Michael Muskal
With the strokes from three gubernatorial pens, Vermont on Monday became the fourth state in the country to allow doctors to prescribe lethal medication to terminally ill patients. Gov. Peter Shumlin signed the measure in a state House ceremony in Montpelier, capping a decade-long effort on the issue in Vermont. Vermont is the first state to pass such a law through the legislative process. Oregon and Washington enacted their laws by referendum; in Montana, it was legalized by the courts.
NATIONAL
May 14, 2013 | By Michael Mello
Vermont is on track to become the fourth state to allow severely ill patients to end their lives under medical supervision. The state's House of Representatives voted 75 to 65 on Monday night to approve the “Patient Choice at End of Life” measure. The legislation, passed by the Senate in February, now goes to Gov. Peter Shumlin, who said he would sign it. If he does, it will make Vermont the first state to approve such a measure through state lawmakers. Oregon and Washington enacted their laws through a referendum, and a Montana Supreme Court decision made it legal in that state.
SCIENCE
April 30, 2013 | By Geoffrey Mohan
Monday, April 15, the day of the Boston Marathon bombings and the federal income tax filing deadline, was the saddest day online in five years. At least that's what the makers of the "hedonometer" computer program suggest. Scientists at the University of Vermont and MITRE Corp. have been crunching millions of messages from Twitter in an effort to quantify the public mood. Their results went public Tuesday at hedonometer.org In February, the gang at the University of Vermont and MITRE made headlines when it declared the happiest and saddest cities in the U.S., based on geo-tagged tweets from cellphones: Napa, Calif., and Beaumont, Texas.
NATIONAL
October 16, 2006 | From the Associated Press
About 900 people packed a brick chapel Sunday to remember a University of Vermont student found dead last week. Michelle Gardner-Quinn's smile beamed down from two easel-mounted photographs as a minister and friends eulogized the 21-year-old senior, who was found dead Friday in a ravine near Burlington. Gardner-Quinn was last seen Oct. 7 walking up Main Street in Burlington with Brian L. Rooney, 36, after borrowing his cellphone to call friends.
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