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NEWS
September 25, 2000 | EMILY GREEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On July 13, the owners of two Vermont sheep farms were called into the Montpelier offices of the U.S. Department of Agriculture and given an ultimatum: turn over their flocks or have them seized. Either way, animals would be destroyed. Four of the sheep, the owners were told, had tested positive for a disease called "transmissible spongiform encephalopathy," or TSE.
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NEWS
March 24, 2001 | From Times Wire Services
Federal agents trying to prevent so-called mad cow disease from gaining a foothold in the United States seized a second flock of Vermont sheep Friday as protesters mockingly gave the Nazi salute. "They were stolen from our farm today," owner Larry Faillace said. The 126 sheep were loaded into a truck bound for Iowa, where they will be destroyed and their brains tested for mad cow disease. The truck was briefly blocked by protesters before it left.
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NEWS
January 10, 1994 | PATRICK BOYLE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Walker Farm is draped in folds of wind-blown snow, the greenhouse blowers silent, the front of the spacious vegetable store boarded up. Only the occasional truck or car on Route 5, passing within a few feet of the farmhouse, disturbs the stillness. But inside the 223-year-old wood-frame house, Jack Mannix and his wife, Karen, are busier than they would normally be in winter. The computer hums and the phone rings at a desk in the dining room near a hot wood stove.
NEWS
March 23, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
A flock of 233 Vermont sheep the government fears were exposed to mad cow disease arrived at the nation's premier veterinary laboratory in Ames, where they will be killed and their brains tested. The Agriculture Department seized the sheep Wednesday from a farm in Vermont and transported them under police escort. Agriculture Department spokesman Ed Curlett said the seizure was the first of any cow or sheep in the U.S. suspected of having an illness related to mad cow disease.
NEWS
March 23, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
A flock of 233 Vermont sheep the government fears were exposed to mad cow disease arrived at the nation's premier veterinary laboratory in Ames, where they will be killed and their brains tested. The Agriculture Department seized the sheep Wednesday from a farm in Vermont and transported them under police escort. Agriculture Department spokesman Ed Curlett said the seizure was the first of any cow or sheep in the U.S. suspected of having an illness related to mad cow disease.
NEWS
March 24, 2001 | From Times Wire Services
Federal agents trying to prevent so-called mad cow disease from gaining a foothold in the United States seized a second flock of Vermont sheep Friday as protesters mockingly gave the Nazi salute. "They were stolen from our farm today," owner Larry Faillace said. The 126 sheep were loaded into a truck bound for Iowa, where they will be destroyed and their brains tested for mad cow disease. The truck was briefly blocked by protesters before it left.
NEWS
July 20, 2000 | From Times Wire Services
Disgruntled Vermont farmers went to court Wednesday in an attempt to prevent the U.S. Department of Agriculture from destroying their sheep because they may carry an ailment similar to "mad cow" disease in cattle. The USDA, which has been closely monitoring all American livestock since the 1996 outbreak of mad cow disease in Europe, wants to destroy sheep on three Vermont farms as a precaution.
NEWS
July 22, 2000 | From Associated Press
A federal judge on Friday granted a week's reprieve to 355 sheep that may carry a version of the always-fatal mad cow disease. Lawyers for the owners of two flocks of sheep asked Judge J. Garvan Murtha to halt the Department of Agriculture's plan to destroy the sheep on the suspicion that they might spread the disease in the United States. The USDA seized a flock of 21 sheep from a third farmer Friday. The owner voluntarily sold the sheep, which will be destroyed.
NEWS
August 2, 2000 | From Associated Press
A federal judge ruled Tuesday that two flocks of sheep the federal government says might suffer from a version of the always-fatal mad cow disease should be killed. U.S. District Judge J. Garvan Murtha in Brattleboro refused to issue an injunction that would have stopped the slaughter of the flocks, which are owned by Larry and Linda Faillace of East Warren, and Houghton Freeman of Stowe.
BUSINESS
February 7, 2004 | From Associated Press
Some maple syrup being sold by the trendy specialty food retailer Trader Joe's Co. is striking a sour note in New England. A Massachusetts association of maple syrup producers claims the Monrovia-based chain is selling lower-grade imported syrup as Grade A. Henry Marckres, who heads the Vermont agriculture department's testing laboratory, said one sample he tested was close to commercial grade, which federal regulators have limited to uses such as curing tobacco and bacon.
NEWS
September 25, 2000 | EMILY GREEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On July 13, the owners of two Vermont sheep farms were called into the Montpelier offices of the U.S. Department of Agriculture and given an ultimatum: turn over their flocks or have them seized. Either way, animals would be destroyed. Four of the sheep, the owners were told, had tested positive for a disease called "transmissible spongiform encephalopathy," or TSE.
NEWS
August 2, 2000 | From Associated Press
A federal judge ruled Tuesday that two flocks of sheep the federal government says might suffer from a version of the always-fatal mad cow disease should be killed. U.S. District Judge J. Garvan Murtha in Brattleboro refused to issue an injunction that would have stopped the slaughter of the flocks, which are owned by Larry and Linda Faillace of East Warren, and Houghton Freeman of Stowe.
NEWS
July 22, 2000 | From Associated Press
A federal judge on Friday granted a week's reprieve to 355 sheep that may carry a version of the always-fatal mad cow disease. Lawyers for the owners of two flocks of sheep asked Judge J. Garvan Murtha to halt the Department of Agriculture's plan to destroy the sheep on the suspicion that they might spread the disease in the United States. The USDA seized a flock of 21 sheep from a third farmer Friday. The owner voluntarily sold the sheep, which will be destroyed.
NEWS
July 20, 2000 | From Times Wire Services
Disgruntled Vermont farmers went to court Wednesday in an attempt to prevent the U.S. Department of Agriculture from destroying their sheep because they may carry an ailment similar to "mad cow" disease in cattle. The USDA, which has been closely monitoring all American livestock since the 1996 outbreak of mad cow disease in Europe, wants to destroy sheep on three Vermont farms as a precaution.
NEWS
January 10, 1994 | PATRICK BOYLE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Walker Farm is draped in folds of wind-blown snow, the greenhouse blowers silent, the front of the spacious vegetable store boarded up. Only the occasional truck or car on Route 5, passing within a few feet of the farmhouse, disturbs the stillness. But inside the 223-year-old wood-frame house, Jack Mannix and his wife, Karen, are busier than they would normally be in winter. The computer hums and the phone rings at a desk in the dining room near a hot wood stove.
NEWS
June 28, 1992 | MEG DENNISON, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The fiddlehead fern is a delicate button, as likely to be sauteed with olive oil and herbs at New York's Four Seasons restaurant as it is to end up under Cheese Whiz in a Vermont kitchen. Not that everyone loves them. But those who know the green, which tastes like a cross between asparagus and broccoli and is high in Vitamins A and C, feel strongly about them.
NEWS
February 11, 2001 | WILSON RING, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The sun and the air and the light are good in this place and have made me healthy as I never was in my life. . . . It's three miles from anywhere and wondrously self-contained. No one can get at you. --Rudyard Kipling in an 1892 letter about Naulakha, his home in Dummerston, Vt. * The apple trees that are Fred Holbrook's legacy spread up the slopes of Skyrocket Hill, stretching well beyond the barns of Scott Farm.
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