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Vermont Budget

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May 23, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Vermont's non-binding presidential primary has become the latest victim of the state's budget woes. Lawmakers in Montpelier grappling with ways to pare the budget for the coming year axed the primary, some arguing the election was little more than an unaffordable beauty contest. Vermont, one of only a few states that hold non-binding primaries, chooses its delegates to the national conventions through a system of town caucuses and state party conventions.
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NEWS
May 23, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Vermont's non-binding presidential primary has become the latest victim of the state's budget woes. Lawmakers in Montpelier grappling with ways to pare the budget for the coming year axed the primary, some arguing the election was little more than an unaffordable beauty contest. Vermont, one of only a few states that hold non-binding primaries, chooses its delegates to the national conventions through a system of town caucuses and state party conventions.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 30, 1989
Imagine a governor of California proposing creation of an environmental trust fund that is about half the size of the state's annual budget, or something over $20 billion. Or picture a California governor telling voters that the state's environmental agenda will make large financial demands on them. Or saying, "I make these proposals knowing that they will require sacrifice from each one of us." Those are the words of Vermont Gov. Madeleine M.
NATIONAL
July 12, 2003 | Elizabeth Mehren and Mark Z. Barabak, Times Staff Writers
As Vermont governor, Howard Dean was known as a buttoned-down and bottom-line chief executive. He fought higher taxes, cut programs over the cries of fellow Democrats and often sided with business when the choice was jobs versus the environment. Which explains why many people back home scarcely recognize Howard Dean the presidential candidate, who has stirred liberals across the country with his blunt talk and passionate antiwar speeches.
NATIONAL
October 10, 2003 | Mark Z. Barabak, Times Staff Writer
Wesley Clark and Howard Dean, the two candidates leading most Democratic preference polls, came under sharp attack Thursday night from presidential rivals who challenged their loyalty to the party and its principles. The war in Iraq -- a perpetual divide in the Democratic contest -- also dominated much of the discussion, as nine White House hopefuls shared a stage for 90 minutes of vigorous jousting that saw them needle each other as much as President Bush.
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