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NEWS
May 19, 1990 | TED ROHRLICH, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
First, Harriet Smith was hit by a pickup truck while crossing the street. Then she was blindsided by the state of Vermont. Just as her lawsuit against the pickup driver was set for a jury trial, the state said she couldn't have one. Smith was incredulous. Civil jury trials are guaranteed as a matter of right by the U.S. Constitution and referred to as "sacred" by Vermont's.
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NATIONAL
March 23, 2008 | From the Associated Press
. -- When shooting suspect Christopher Williams acted up in prison, he was given nutraloaf -- a mixture of cubed whole-wheat bread, nondairy cheese, raw carrots, spinach, seedless raisins, beans, vegetable oil, tomato paste, powdered milk and dehydrated potato flakes. Prison officials call it a complete meal. Inmates say it's so awful they'd rather go hungry. On Monday, the Vermont Supreme Court will hear arguments in a class-action suit brought by inmates who say it's not food but punishment and that anyone subjected to it should get a formal disciplinary process first.
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NEWS
April 1, 1987
The Vermont Legislature reelected three justices to the state Supreme Court, including one jurist facing misconduct charges. Associate Justice Ernest Gibson III, who faces upcoming hearings before the Judicial Conduct Board, was reelected 137 to 23 in a joint session of the Legislature. Also reelected were Chief Justice Frederic Allen, by a margin of 148 to 13, and Associate Justice William Peck, by a vote of 141 to 18. They do not face misconduct charges.
NATIONAL
November 29, 2006 | Lee Romney, Times Staff Writer
A Virginia appellate court ruled Tuesday in a closely watched lesbian custody dispute that the biological mother must answer to the laws of Vermont, where she and her former partner entered into a civil union and raised a child together. The ruling skirted a broader question key to the national debate: whether Virginia can be forced to recognize such a union sanctioned in another state.
NEWS
March 10, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Vermont Supreme Court has upheld the 1988 drug conviction of John A. Zaccaro Jr., the son of former vice presidential candidate Geraldine A. Ferraro.
NEWS
December 21, 1999 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vermont took a major step Monday toward becoming the first state to recognize "domestic partnerships" for same-sex couples that will carry the same legal protections as marriage. In a ruling hailed as a landmark by gay-rights advocates, the state Supreme Court said that Vermont must offer gay couples the "benefits and protections that flow from marriage." The court did not say how that must be done.
NEWS
June 13, 1996 | BARRY SIEGEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At first, authorities here responded in customary fashion to the report that reached them just before midnight on a bitterly cold Valentine's Day. Police rushed to the snow-covered downtown street where a semiconscious woman lay on a frozen bed of pine needles. They studied the drops of blood on a nearby wall, the drag marks etched in the hard earth, the multiple injuries about the 23-year-old's half-naked body.
NEWS
January 30, 1987 | Associated Press
Three of the five justices on Vermont's Supreme Court have been accused of judicial misconduct, and Gov. Madeleine M. Kunin asked them Thursday to step down until the charges are resolved. The allegations range from attempts to derail a criminal investigation against an assistant county judge to an effort to fire a court employee who rebuffed a sexual advance by one of the justices.
NEWS
December 13, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A federal appeals court ruled that the display of a 16-foot menorah in a Burlington, Vt., park is unconstitutional because it violates the separation of church and state. In a 2-1 decision, the U.S. 2nd Circuit Court of Appeals in New York reversed a lower court's decision allowing the city to issue a permit to a Jewish group to erect the menorah in a park next to City Hall. The appeals judges based their decision on a U.S.
NEWS
August 16, 1986 | Associated Press
Three justices of the Vermont Supreme Court are under investigation for possible misconduct stemming from their relationship with a lower court judge who is also under scrutiny, it was reported Friday. Richard Mallary, vice chairman of the state Judicial Conduct Board, confirmed that the board decided this week to expand its probe of Chittenden County Assistant Judge Jane Wheel to include Justices Thomas Hayes, William Hill and Ernest Gibson III.
NEWS
December 21, 1999 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vermont took a major step Monday toward becoming the first state to recognize "domestic partnerships" for same-sex couples that will carry the same legal protections as marriage. In a ruling hailed as a landmark by gay-rights advocates, the state Supreme Court said that Vermont must offer gay couples the "benefits and protections that flow from marriage." The court did not say how that must be done.
NEWS
June 13, 1996 | BARRY SIEGEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At first, authorities here responded in customary fashion to the report that reached them just before midnight on a bitterly cold Valentine's Day. Police rushed to the snow-covered downtown street where a semiconscious woman lay on a frozen bed of pine needles. They studied the drops of blood on a nearby wall, the drag marks etched in the hard earth, the multiple injuries about the 23-year-old's half-naked body.
NEWS
May 22, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Vermont Supreme Court Justice Louis Peck can remain on the bench even though he is past the state's mandatory retirement age for judges, a federal appeals court ruled. However, Peck, now 71, said he will now give some thought to stepping down. Vermont's constitution calls on all judges to retire at age 70, but Peck had fought the provision, saying it conflicted with a federal age discrimination law. The ruling by the New York-based U.S.
NEWS
May 19, 1990 | TED ROHRLICH, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
First, Harriet Smith was hit by a pickup truck while crossing the street. Then she was blindsided by the state of Vermont. Just as her lawsuit against the pickup driver was set for a jury trial, the state said she couldn't have one. Smith was incredulous. Civil jury trials are guaranteed as a matter of right by the U.S. Constitution and referred to as "sacred" by Vermont's.
NEWS
March 10, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Vermont Supreme Court has upheld the 1988 drug conviction of John A. Zaccaro Jr., the son of former vice presidential candidate Geraldine A. Ferraro.
NEWS
December 13, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A federal appeals court ruled that the display of a 16-foot menorah in a Burlington, Vt., park is unconstitutional because it violates the separation of church and state. In a 2-1 decision, the U.S. 2nd Circuit Court of Appeals in New York reversed a lower court's decision allowing the city to issue a permit to a Jewish group to erect the menorah in a park next to City Hall. The appeals judges based their decision on a U.S.
NATIONAL
November 29, 2006 | Lee Romney, Times Staff Writer
A Virginia appellate court ruled Tuesday in a closely watched lesbian custody dispute that the biological mother must answer to the laws of Vermont, where she and her former partner entered into a civil union and raised a child together. The ruling skirted a broader question key to the national debate: whether Virginia can be forced to recognize such a union sanctioned in another state.
NEWS
May 22, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Vermont Supreme Court Justice Louis Peck can remain on the bench even though he is past the state's mandatory retirement age for judges, a federal appeals court ruled. However, Peck, now 71, said he will now give some thought to stepping down. Vermont's constitution calls on all judges to retire at age 70, but Peck had fought the provision, saying it conflicted with a federal age discrimination law. The ruling by the New York-based U.S.
NEWS
April 1, 1987
The Vermont Legislature reelected three justices to the state Supreme Court, including one jurist facing misconduct charges. Associate Justice Ernest Gibson III, who faces upcoming hearings before the Judicial Conduct Board, was reelected 137 to 23 in a joint session of the Legislature. Also reelected were Chief Justice Frederic Allen, by a margin of 148 to 13, and Associate Justice William Peck, by a vote of 141 to 18. They do not face misconduct charges.
NEWS
January 30, 1987 | Associated Press
Three of the five justices on Vermont's Supreme Court have been accused of judicial misconduct, and Gov. Madeleine M. Kunin asked them Thursday to step down until the charges are resolved. The allegations range from attempts to derail a criminal investigation against an assistant county judge to an effort to fire a court employee who rebuffed a sexual advance by one of the justices.
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