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August 22, 1991 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This is the land of the cow on the hillside, the cow on the T-shirt, the cow on the Ben & Jerry's ice cream container. It is the land of sweet air and town-owned forests, of covered bridges and meadows lush with wildflowers. Life just feels healthy here. People walk down the street in Birkenstock sandals. They windsurf in the summer and ski in the winter. Vermonters frown on plastic shopping bags. They think globally but act locally. "Save the World," one poster of dancing Holsteins proclaims.
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NEWS
March 22, 2001 | STEPHANIE SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federal officials on Wednesday seized a Vermont farmer's flock of sheep over suspicions that some of the animals may be infected with mad cow disease and could pose a threat to livestock nationwide. It was the first time that the U.S. government has confiscated livestock as a precaution against mad cow disease. About two dozen federal agents converged on a farm in Greensboro, Vt., at dawn to load 233 sheep and lambs onto trailers.
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NEWS
July 19, 2000 | From Associated Press
The state Health Department on Tuesday recommended that people not eat cheese made with milk from three flocks of sheep officials fear could be infected with the sheep version of mad cow disease. Health Commissioner Dr. Jan Carney said she made the recommendation after discussing the matter with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta. Carney said there were no known cases of people contracting the always-fatal mad cow disease from milk or milk products such as cheese.
NEWS
December 15, 2000 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seeking to prevent Vermont from extending lower prescription drug prices to a wider range of residents through Medicaid, the pharmaceutical industry has filed a lawsuit against the federal government. This week's action by the trade group PhRMA, the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America, will likely postpone the Jan. 1 start of a new Vermont program that would allow an additional 69,000 state residents to save an average of 30% on prescription drug prices.
NEWS
December 15, 2000 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seeking to prevent Vermont from extending lower prescription drug prices to a wider range of residents through Medicaid, the pharmaceutical industry has filed a lawsuit against the federal government. This week's action by the trade group PhRMA, the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America, will likely postpone the Jan. 1 start of a new Vermont program that would allow an additional 69,000 state residents to save an average of 30% on prescription drug prices.
NEWS
March 22, 2001 | STEPHANIE SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federal officials on Wednesday seized a Vermont farmer's flock of sheep over suspicions that some of the animals may be infected with mad cow disease and could pose a threat to livestock nationwide. It was the first time that the U.S. government has confiscated livestock as a precaution against mad cow disease. About two dozen federal agents converged on a farm in Greensboro, Vt., at dawn to load 233 sheep and lambs onto trailers.
NEWS
September 6, 2001 | From Associated Press
Democratic Gov. Howard Dean, who survived a tough reelection campaign last fall after ushering in Vermont's pioneering law allowing gay couples to form civil unions, said Wednesday he will not run again next year. Dean, 52, said he simply decided that after 10 years in office, it was time to go. "The baton has to be passed sometime," he said. "I have accomplished many things that I wanted to accomplish in this job. What we have done is extraordinary."
NEWS
October 27, 1987 | ALLAN PARACHINI, Times Staff Writer
Rapid technological advances in treatment of very ill or low birthweight babies are, at long last, being overtaken by related ethical concerns about how much should be done for a profoundly debilitated newborn and fears about the psychological toll of weeks or months in a neonatal intensive care unit. That is the assessment of a USC neonatologist reviewing the state of medical care for newborns in an annual special issue of the Journal of the American Medical Assn.
NEWS
March 2, 2003 | David Gram, Associated Press Writer
Patricia Barr was just back from a holiday trip to visit her daughter in New York, her mother was coming to visit, and she was feeling fine. It had been 15 years since she was first diagnosed with breast cancer, and the disease had spread to other parts of her body. But physicians, friends and loved ones were unanimous. "I was doing great," she recalled. There was just one little problem. She had tripped and fallen a couple times during her trip.
NEWS
September 25, 2000 | EMILY GREEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On July 13, the owners of two Vermont sheep farms were called into the Montpelier offices of the U.S. Department of Agriculture and given an ultimatum: turn over their flocks or have them seized. Either way, animals would be destroyed. Four of the sheep, the owners were told, had tested positive for a disease called "transmissible spongiform encephalopathy," or TSE.
NEWS
July 19, 2000 | From Associated Press
The state Health Department on Tuesday recommended that people not eat cheese made with milk from three flocks of sheep officials fear could be infected with the sheep version of mad cow disease. Health Commissioner Dr. Jan Carney said she made the recommendation after discussing the matter with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta. Carney said there were no known cases of people contracting the always-fatal mad cow disease from milk or milk products such as cheese.
NEWS
August 22, 1991 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This is the land of the cow on the hillside, the cow on the T-shirt, the cow on the Ben & Jerry's ice cream container. It is the land of sweet air and town-owned forests, of covered bridges and meadows lush with wildflowers. Life just feels healthy here. People walk down the street in Birkenstock sandals. They windsurf in the summer and ski in the winter. Vermonters frown on plastic shopping bags. They think globally but act locally. "Save the World," one poster of dancing Holsteins proclaims.
NEWS
January 30, 1990 | GARY LIBMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the nation watched in late 1969 and early 1970, John Froines and his co-defendants turned the Chicago 7 trial into a theater of the absurd protesting the U.S. political system. But that was then; this is now. The chemist, recently named director of UCLA's Occupational Health Center, wants to know why reporters can't ask about his public health career from 1974 to the present. Why do they focus on his radical past? "People are always saying, 'Is John Froines the same radical he was in 1968?'
NEWS
September 15, 1993 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Not content to wait for President Clinton's plans to revamp the nation's health care system, many governors and state legislatures are moving to improve coverage on their own. Health insurance for everyone has been a major White House goal. Yet Hawaii has been moving toward it since 1974, Vermont is aiming to achieve it by July, 1995, and Washington state wants it done by 1998. Oregon has started the process by expanding insurance coverage to many more of its indigent residents.
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