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April 11, 1994 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Spring comes to Vermont not with a sudden blush of blossoms or a burst of cracking ice, but with a slow and silent ritual in the maple groves that speaks of winter's end. The ritual takes place every year in this season between the seasons, when the knee-deep forest snow has turned soft underfoot and Vermont--the skiers gone, the tourists not yet arrived--belongs again, if only for a brief interlude, to Vermonters.
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BUSINESS
February 21, 1997 | From Reuters
Vermont is becoming a brewing center while refusing to adopt the Joe Sixpack way of life. Just eight years after the Legislature passed a law that allows brewers to sell their beers on premises, there are 13 microbreweries in the state. Most started out as one-man shops. Today they employ more than 100 people. But Vermont is not in any danger of losing its image as a haven for hippies, not for beer-guzzling rednecks.
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BUSINESS
February 21, 1997 | From Reuters
Vermont is becoming a brewing center while refusing to adopt the Joe Sixpack way of life. Just eight years after the Legislature passed a law that allows brewers to sell their beers on premises, there are 13 microbreweries in the state. Most started out as one-man shops. Today they employ more than 100 people. But Vermont is not in any danger of losing its image as a haven for hippies, not for beer-guzzling rednecks.
NEWS
April 11, 1994 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Spring comes to Vermont not with a sudden blush of blossoms or a burst of cracking ice, but with a slow and silent ritual in the maple groves that speaks of winter's end. The ritual takes place every year in this season between the seasons, when the knee-deep forest snow has turned soft underfoot and Vermont--the skiers gone, the tourists not yet arrived--belongs again, if only for a brief interlude, to Vermonters.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 2008 | margot roosevelt, Times Staff Writer
Say you buy a car that coughs out a lot of greenhouse gases. Should you pay more for the privilege of polluting? And say your neighbor buys a car that spews out far less. Should he be rewarded for helping to save the planet? This week, the California Assembly is expected to vote on the California Clean Car Discount Act, which, if passed, would be the nation's first "feebate" law, imposing charges and granting rebates based on a vehicle's emission of carbon dioxide and other gases.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 2010 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
Dr. John M. Peters, a pioneering USC epidemiologist who played a crucial role in demonstrating the short- and long-term effects of air pollutants on the health of children, died of pancreatic cancer May 6 at his home in San Marino. He was 75. Peters was the driving force in creating the Children's Health Study, which has followed nearly 1,800 Southern California children since 1993 to determine how their health was affected by varying levels of air pollution. Among other findings, the study showed that short-term exposure to pollutants increases asthma and absences from school, that children living and studying near freeways suffer the worst effects from air pollution and that long-term exposure stunts the growth of the lungs, leading to breathing impairments and other problems in adulthood.
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