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NEWS
June 4, 1987 | United Press International
Gov. Madeleine M. Kunin Wednesday signed a bill strictly limiting smoking in the workplace, making Vermont the 17th state to enact such legislation. The new law, which Kunin labeled "one of the most broad-based, comprehensive steps we can take" to protect public health, requires employers to have written smoking policies in effect by July 1, 1988.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 2011 | By Dean Kuipers
Vermont Law School, which has one of the top-ranked environmental law programs in the country, just released its second annual Top 10 Environmental Watch List of issues and developments that should be closely followed in 2012. Top of the list? Republican attacks on the Environmental Protection Agency. According to an innovative online database set up by L.A.'s own Rep. Henry Waxman, there have been 170 anti-environmental votes under the Republican majority in the 112 th Congress, and 91 of them attacked the EPA. Other hot topics on the watch list include that same EPA and the White House clashing over ozone standards, the activist effort to stop the Keystone XL pipeline, and landmark settlements under the Endangered Species Act. Because it's a law school, all of these issues are law-related.
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NEWS
January 14, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Fraternities at Middlebury College in Montpelier, Vt., must admit women or close, the school's Board of Trustees decreed. The Delta Upsilon fraternity created a furor a year ago when members hung a bloodied female mannequin over the balcony of their house during a party. There had been other complaints about sexism on campus in recent years, but the mannequin was cited by many as a catalyst leading to board action.
NATIONAL
April 27, 2011 | By David G. Savage, Washington Bureau
Government lawyers defending limits on the marketing of new drugs ran into sharply skeptical questions Tuesday at the Supreme Court from conservative justices who said the 1st Amendment protected the free-speech rights of drug makers to market their products directly to doctors. At issue is whether states can forbid pharmacies from selling to drug makers the confidential prescription records of physicians. Armed with this information, drug company salesmen have targeted doctors who are not prescribing new and costly brand-name drugs.
NEWS
May 22, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Vermont Supreme Court Justice Louis Peck can remain on the bench even though he is past the state's mandatory retirement age for judges, a federal appeals court ruled. However, Peck, now 71, said he will now give some thought to stepping down. Vermont's constitution calls on all judges to retire at age 70, but Peck had fought the provision, saying it conflicted with a federal age discrimination law. The ruling by the New York-based U.S.
NEWS
April 20, 1991
In response to Aaron Curtiss' article, "Butting Heads Over Helmets," this country is slowly but surely strangling the very foundation upon which we originally envisioned and built it--freedom to choose. To choose where we live, where to work, how many children to have. Freedom to choose what to drive. I choose to drive a motorcycle. My freedom of choice is being threatened. Not by a fellow motorcyclist, but by some pencil-pushing assemblyman named Floyd.
BUSINESS
November 16, 1992 | DAVID W. MYERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Steven Converse Brooks sold his Burlington, Vt., home to John and Linda Cifarelli in 1988, he neglected to tell them that a faulty boiler in the house had leaked poison gas, injuring his girlfriend and daughter. Three months after they moved in, the Cifarellis and one of their daughters were found dead of carbon monoxide poisoning.
NEWS
September 2, 1988 | United Press International
Gov. Madeleine M. Kunin closed the state's house-arrest program to drug offenders Thursday, but the decision allows John A. Zaccaro Jr. to complete his cocaine trafficking sentence in a luxury apartment. Zaccaro, 24, son of 1984 Democratic vice presidential nominee Geraldine A. Ferraro, spent less than 30 minutes of a four-month sentence at a Burlington correctional center before taking up residence July 1 in a $1,500-a-month Burlington apartment featuring cable television and maid service.
NEWS
July 1, 2000 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mindful of a law banning booze on municipal property, Annette Cappy will stop short of serving champagne. But to the town clerk in this southern Vermont village, opening her office just after midnight this morning--the minute that civil unions between same-sex couples become legal here--seems like the right thing to do. "This office has been known to stay open for 24 hours on the first day of hunting season," Cappy said.
NEWS
July 2, 2000 | From Associated Press
In ceremonies simple and elaborate, gay couples around Vermont stood before justices of the peace and clergy Saturday to be legally joined as spouses. It wasn't quite marriage, but Vermont's new civil unions law, which took effect Saturday, granted them all the rights, benefits and responsibilities of marriage in the state. And they were thrilled. "I think it's about time after 27 1/2 years," said Lois Farnham, her arm around partner Holly Puterbaugh after they got their civil union license.
NATIONAL
June 27, 2006 | David G. Savage, Times Staff Writer
The Supreme Court dealt a defeat Monday to liberal reformers who sought to limit sharply the impact of money in politics. In a 6-3 decision, the court struck down a novel Vermont law that would have strictly limited how much money candidates for state office can spend on their campaigns, as well as how much donors can give them. Had the law been upheld, reformers saw it as a model for other states to limit campaign spending.
NEWS
July 2, 2000 | From Associated Press
In ceremonies simple and elaborate, gay couples around Vermont stood before justices of the peace and clergy Saturday to be legally joined as spouses. It wasn't quite marriage, but Vermont's new civil unions law, which took effect Saturday, granted them all the rights, benefits and responsibilities of marriage in the state. And they were thrilled. "I think it's about time after 27 1/2 years," said Lois Farnham, her arm around partner Holly Puterbaugh after they got their civil union license.
NEWS
July 1, 2000 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mindful of a law banning booze on municipal property, Annette Cappy will stop short of serving champagne. But to the town clerk in this southern Vermont village, opening her office just after midnight this morning--the minute that civil unions between same-sex couples become legal here--seems like the right thing to do. "This office has been known to stay open for 24 hours on the first day of hunting season," Cappy said.
BUSINESS
November 16, 1992 | DAVID W. MYERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Steven Converse Brooks sold his Burlington, Vt., home to John and Linda Cifarelli in 1988, he neglected to tell them that a faulty boiler in the house had leaked poison gas, injuring his girlfriend and daughter. Three months after they moved in, the Cifarellis and one of their daughters were found dead of carbon monoxide poisoning.
NEWS
April 20, 1991
In response to Aaron Curtiss' article, "Butting Heads Over Helmets," this country is slowly but surely strangling the very foundation upon which we originally envisioned and built it--freedom to choose. To choose where we live, where to work, how many children to have. Freedom to choose what to drive. I choose to drive a motorcycle. My freedom of choice is being threatened. Not by a fellow motorcyclist, but by some pencil-pushing assemblyman named Floyd.
NEWS
May 22, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Vermont Supreme Court Justice Louis Peck can remain on the bench even though he is past the state's mandatory retirement age for judges, a federal appeals court ruled. However, Peck, now 71, said he will now give some thought to stepping down. Vermont's constitution calls on all judges to retire at age 70, but Peck had fought the provision, saying it conflicted with a federal age discrimination law. The ruling by the New York-based U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 2011 | By Dean Kuipers
Vermont Law School, which has one of the top-ranked environmental law programs in the country, just released its second annual Top 10 Environmental Watch List of issues and developments that should be closely followed in 2012. Top of the list? Republican attacks on the Environmental Protection Agency. According to an innovative online database set up by L.A.'s own Rep. Henry Waxman, there have been 170 anti-environmental votes under the Republican majority in the 112 th Congress, and 91 of them attacked the EPA. Other hot topics on the watch list include that same EPA and the White House clashing over ozone standards, the activist effort to stop the Keystone XL pipeline, and landmark settlements under the Endangered Species Act. Because it's a law school, all of these issues are law-related.
NATIONAL
April 27, 2011 | By David G. Savage, Washington Bureau
Government lawyers defending limits on the marketing of new drugs ran into sharply skeptical questions Tuesday at the Supreme Court from conservative justices who said the 1st Amendment protected the free-speech rights of drug makers to market their products directly to doctors. At issue is whether states can forbid pharmacies from selling to drug makers the confidential prescription records of physicians. Armed with this information, drug company salesmen have targeted doctors who are not prescribing new and costly brand-name drugs.
NEWS
January 14, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Fraternities at Middlebury College in Montpelier, Vt., must admit women or close, the school's Board of Trustees decreed. The Delta Upsilon fraternity created a furor a year ago when members hung a bloodied female mannequin over the balcony of their house during a party. There had been other complaints about sexism on campus in recent years, but the mannequin was cited by many as a catalyst leading to board action.
NEWS
September 2, 1988 | United Press International
Gov. Madeleine M. Kunin closed the state's house-arrest program to drug offenders Thursday, but the decision allows John A. Zaccaro Jr. to complete his cocaine trafficking sentence in a luxury apartment. Zaccaro, 24, son of 1984 Democratic vice presidential nominee Geraldine A. Ferraro, spent less than 30 minutes of a four-month sentence at a Burlington correctional center before taking up residence July 1 in a $1,500-a-month Burlington apartment featuring cable television and maid service.
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