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Vermont Square Neighborhood

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 30, 1997 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They shrugged when their neighborhood was mistakenly labeled Watts after the 1965 riots. They seethed when it was characterized as South-Central Los Angeles following the 1992 riots. So now residents of a 3-square-mile section southwest of the Coliseum want to put an end to that kind of confusion by returning to a name coined by early Los Angeles subdividers to describe their neighborhood.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 30, 1997 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They shrugged when their neighborhood was mistakenly labeled Watts after the 1965 riots. They seethed when it was characterized as South-Central Los Angeles following the 1992 riots. So now residents of a 3-square-mile section southwest of the Coliseum want to put an end to that kind of confusion by returning to a name coined by early Los Angeles subdividers to describe their neighborhood.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 1995
Trying to undo the damage of the 1992 riots and a failing neighborhood economy, residents armed with federal dollars will give a 16-block stretch of Vermont Avenue in South-Central Los Angeles a $150,000 face lift. The project, part of the federally funded Los Angeles Neighborhood Initiative program, proposes to transform the mile-long commercial corridor in the Vermont Square neighborhood into an inviting promenade for shoppers and residents by the end of the year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 1997 | JOSEPH HANANIA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Where have you gone, Juan Dzyl? Two years ago, the Vermont Square Neighborhood Assn. in South-Central Los Angeles sponsored a contest for best artist. You remember that contest, don't you, Juan? The association wanted to put a new face on the area with the help of the Los Angeles Neighborhood Initiative, a federal program. The art contest winner's work was to have been displayed on banners hanging from dozens of street lights.
NEWS
February 23, 1997 | JOSEPH HANANIA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Helen Johnson, 66, thinks South-Central has gotten a bum rap. And she's out to do something about it. So, she's growing gardens. She's putting in lights, so neighbors can safely sit in the gardens on hot, summer nights. She's gotten a stretch of Vermont Avenue repaved. She's gotten the neighborhood free of graffiti.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 2012 | By Bob Pool, Los Angeles Times
He's been blind since age 15. But nobody can say that Mason Ewing lacks vision. Overcoming a nightmarish childhood, Ewing, 30, has been a successful fashion designer in Paris. For the last six months, however, his mind has been set on Hollywood, where he hopes to create a teen comedy and a dramatic series for television. Born in Cameroon to an American father and a Cameroonian mother and raised in France, his own life has been filled with drama. His mother, a seamstress and dressmaker, was murdered when Ewing was 4, he said.
FOOD
December 21, 2013 | By Noelle Carter
"There's a rhythm to it, the way she works the masa," Cynthia Gonzalez says quietly. Her mother, Dora, carefully stirs a large pot of masa for tamales over the stove. It's smooth as custard and lightly fragrant as it begins to bubble. Salvadoran tamales are Dora's specialty. She's taken more than 100 requests from family and friends already this season. They are also tradition. Along with other family specialties, the tamales have been passed down, mother to daughter, for generations until now. Cynthia, Dora's only daughter, had never had any interest in cooking.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 1997 | JOSEPH HANANIA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
His name is Juan Dzul, not Juan Dzyl. His family did not return to Mexico two years ago, as some had speculated, but stayed all along in South-Central Los Angeles. Juan is the boy who had won a neighborhood art contest, then seemingly vanished into thin air, disappointing the sponsors who wanted to honor him--and who nonetheless put up banners with his artwork throughout the neighborhood. A teacher's aide at 52nd Street Elementary School who read a Feb.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 2003 | Matea Gold, Times Staff Writer
For years, the term "South-Central Los Angeles" has been a cultural trigger, shorthand for the city's most intractable social ills: drugs, gang violence and poverty. Today the City Council may try to change all that with a vote to eliminate South-Central -- the name, that is -- and replace it on all city documents and signs with "South Los Angeles."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 7, 2012 | Sandy Banks
A newsroom has its own way of tracking a city's trend toward diminishing crime. Twenty years ago, a reporter tallying crime stats for our newspaper's weekly blotter might sift through dozens of killings on a single weekend. There were more than 1,000 homicides a year. Last year, there were fewer than 300 homicides — and many weekends with no killings. Ten years ago, reporters working the streets kept mental lists of neighborhoods considered too dangerous to visit alone. Now, no neighborhood is off-limits.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 26, 2010 | By Joel Rubin and Robert Faturechi
For the first time in more than four decades, Los Angeles is on track to end the year with fewer than 300 killings, a milestone in a steady decline of homicides that has changed the quality of life in many neighborhoods and defied predictions that a bad economy would inexorably lead to higher crime. As of mid-afternoon on Sunday, the Los Angeles Police Department had tallied 291 homicides in 2010. The city is likely to record the fewest number of killings since 1967, when its population was almost 30% smaller.
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