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January 24, 1987 | Associated Press
The Transportation Department levied a $510,000 fine Friday against Arizona because too many of its motorists exceeded the 55 m.p.h. speed limit. It marked the first time the federal government has taken sanctions against a state for failing to enforce the speed limit. The department informed Arizona officials that 1% of the state's non-interstate federal highway money was being withheld after it failed for a third straight year to meet federal highway speed enforcement standards.
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NEWS
April 21, 1987 | From Associated Press
West Virginia and Vermont on Monday raised the speed limit on interstate highways from 55 m.p.h. to 65 m.p.h., bringing to at least nine the number of states that have exercised their option to do so under a new federal law.
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NEWS
April 21, 1987 | From Associated Press
West Virginia and Vermont on Monday raised the speed limit on interstate highways from 55 m.p.h. to 65 m.p.h., bringing to at least nine the number of states that have exercised their option to do so under a new federal law.
NEWS
January 24, 1987 | Associated Press
The Transportation Department levied a $510,000 fine Friday against Arizona because too many of its motorists exceeded the 55 m.p.h. speed limit. It marked the first time the federal government has taken sanctions against a state for failing to enforce the speed limit. The department informed Arizona officials that 1% of the state's non-interstate federal highway money was being withheld after it failed for a third straight year to meet federal highway speed enforcement standards.
NEWS
December 5, 2000 | From Associated Press
Vermont on Monday inaugurated the smallest commuter rail line in America--a 13-mile stretch of track offering two round trips a day aboard a little train called the Champlain Flyer. "This is the beginning, I hope, of a real renaissance in rail," said Gov. Howard Dean, who has championed the project for nine years. Opponents call it a waste of $18 million in state and federal money.
NEWS
December 27, 1987 | DAVID KALISH, United Press International
Dirt roads, long a part of Vermont's pastoral landscape, have become a battleground for those trying to preserve the backcountry life style. Raising dust in the contentious debate are a recent influx of out-of-staters whose initial attraction to dirt-road charm quickly faded in a year of knee-high snow followed by axle-deep mud.
NEWS
October 13, 1996 | ANNE WALLACE ALLEN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Why did the cows cross the road? To graze on the other side. But with 5,000 cars a day speeding by nowadays, the trip across U.S. Highway 2 has become too dangerous for Barbara Bickford's Holsteins. So the state is building a $200,000, 80-foot tunnel under the road, and the cows will soon be able to enjoy the morning grass without getting run down. "It's a horror," said Bickford, whose family has owned the 350-acre farm since 1924. "We can try to cross the road and wait for as many as 50 cars."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 13, 2006 | Dan Weikel, Times Staff Writer
Opponents of building a toll road through San Onofre State Beach challenged assertions Thursday by Orange County turnpike officials that there were no better alternatives to carving a new highway across the popular reserve. At a daylong public hearing in Mission Viejo, a coalition of environmental groups suggested widening Interstate 5 through San Clemente and building a beltway linking the Foothill-Eastern toll road with the freeway and another tollway near San Juan Capistrano.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 2006 | Dan Weikel and David Reyes, Times Staff Writers
New traffic studies contradict optimistic predictions that a proposed tollway through San Onofre State Beach would eliminate much of the congestion on Interstate 5 in South County. Most of I-5 in South County will be "consistently congested" at rush hour by 2030 even if the controversial Foothill South toll road extension is built, according to the Orange County Transportation Authority's long-range transportation plan for 2006.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 2006 | By Dan Weikel and David Reyes, Times Staff Writers
New traffic studies contradict optimistic predictions that a proposed tollway through San Onofre State Beach would eliminate much of the congestion on Interstate 5 in South County. Most of I-5 in South County will be "consistently congested" at rush hour by 2030 even if the controversial Foothill South toll road extension is built, according to the Orange County Transportation Authority's long-range transportation plan for 2006. The forecasts assume construction of the tollway, a carpool lane each way on the I-5 and some interchange improvements.
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