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Vernon Reid

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ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 1990
It's time that someone called Reid the prejudiced person that he is. What else would you call someone who condemns Guns N' Roses for its material but plays on Public Enemy's recording of "Sophisticated Bitch"? His excuse for playing on that song was that it was about a particular type of person but not all women in general. Hey, Vernon, maybe Guns N' Roses was just talking about you, but not all people in general. JAY BRUNKER Irvine
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 1996 | SANDY MASUO
Reid's previous outfit, Living Colour, was not only ambitious but blessed with more than enough chops to realize Reid's thrashy, funky, jazz-inflected hard-rock vision. Ironically, it was the sheer force of the group's musical will that was perhaps its greatest shortcoming; there was so much going on with such intensity that it was often hard to connect with the human beings behind it. Though this solo outing is loaded with many of the same stylistic components, the results are more personable.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 1990
I really enjoyed Robert Hilburn's article, but I felt that I had to set the record straight about his comments on Living Colour. Besides the fact that they should have been listed in the top five, I disagreed with his suggestion that Vernon Reid is the only saving element of the band. Although I agree that Reid's songwriting and musicianship is excellent, it is only the combination of this with the other three elements of Living Colour that makes them one of the best of the new groups.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 1996 | SANDY MASUO
*** Vernon Reid, "Mistaken Identity," Sony/550. Reid's previous outfit, Living Colour, was not only ambitious but blessed with more than enough chops to realize Reid's thrashy, funky, jazz-inflected hard-rock vision. Ironically, it was the sheer force of the group's musical will that was perhaps its greatest shortcoming; there was so much going on with such intensity that it was often hard to connect with the human beings behind it.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 1989
It is absurd to say Vernon Reid is "the best black guitarist since Jimi Hendrix" ("In Black, White and Living Colour," by Dennis Hunt, Jan. 22). You might as well say he is the best guitarist of a certain height. His musical skill cannot be measured in terms of his race. This is, I think, the very point he is trying to make in his interviews. Race may be an influence, but in the end, artistry springs from individuality. MARK CHAET Glendale
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 1993 | STEVE HOCHMAN
* * 1/2 Living Colour, "Stain," Columbia. On its make-or-break third album, the New York quartet focuses its sound into a sharper hard-rock attack while still leaving room for guitarist Vernon Reid to display his distinctive skills. What breaks are the songs, burdened with uninvolving melodies and mundane lyrics. Living Colour has always presented itself as a smart, savvy band with legitimate talent and intellect, but little here meets the expectations raised by that image.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 26, 1989 | Claudia Puig, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Rock 'n' roll and rap musicians rallied across the street from the White House on Monday to protest groups they say want to censor their music. Attending the rally, held on the 200th anniversary of Congress sending the Bill of Rights to the states for ratification, were Joseph Simmons of the rap group Run-DMC and guitarist Vernon Reid of Living Colour. Statements from Frank Zappa and Bruce Springsteen were read.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 1990
Little Richard, quoted in a late '60s Rolling Stone interview, said: "Let me tell you this--when I came out, they weren't playing no black artists on no Top 40 stations. I was the first, but it took people like Elvis to open the door for this kind of music, and I thank God for Elvis Presley." As for the black community never accepting or liking Elvis, I guess that James Brown, Sammy Davis Jr., Muhammad Ali, Jackie Wilson, B.B. King, Eldridge Cleaver, Aaron Neville, Eddie Murphy and Howlin' Wolf are no longer considered part of that community?
ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 1996 | SANDY MASUO
*** Vernon Reid, "Mistaken Identity," Sony/550. Reid's previous outfit, Living Colour, was not only ambitious but blessed with more than enough chops to realize Reid's thrashy, funky, jazz-inflected hard-rock vision. Ironically, it was the sheer force of the group's musical will that was perhaps its greatest shortcoming; there was so much going on with such intensity that it was often hard to connect with the human beings behind it.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 1989
Regarding my comments in the Nov. 26 article "Experiencing Jimi Hendrix" and the letters to Calendar that followed: I did not mean to imply that the song "Machine Gun" related specifically to African-American soldiers or that Hendrix's "The Star Spangled Banner" had power only because Hendrix was black. What I was saying was that "The Star Spangled Banner" had power for me, as a black person, because of where the country was with civil rights and the anti-war effort. Every question that I was asked related to how Hendrix influenced me as a black musician coming up. If I had been asked other questions about his influence on white musicians, fashions or the like, I would have answered accordingly.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 1993 | STEVE HOCHMAN
* * 1/2 Living Colour, "Stain," Columbia. On its make-or-break third album, the New York quartet focuses its sound into a sharper hard-rock attack while still leaving room for guitarist Vernon Reid to display his distinctive skills. What breaks are the songs, burdened with uninvolving melodies and mundane lyrics. Living Colour has always presented itself as a smart, savvy band with legitimate talent and intellect, but little here meets the expectations raised by that image.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 1990
I really enjoyed Robert Hilburn's article, but I felt that I had to set the record straight about his comments on Living Colour. Besides the fact that they should have been listed in the top five, I disagreed with his suggestion that Vernon Reid is the only saving element of the band. Although I agree that Reid's songwriting and musicianship is excellent, it is only the combination of this with the other three elements of Living Colour that makes them one of the best of the new groups.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 1990
It's time that someone called Reid the prejudiced person that he is. What else would you call someone who condemns Guns N' Roses for its material but plays on Public Enemy's recording of "Sophisticated Bitch"? His excuse for playing on that song was that it was about a particular type of person but not all women in general. Hey, Vernon, maybe Guns N' Roses was just talking about you, but not all people in general. JAY BRUNKER Irvine
ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 1990
Little Richard, quoted in a late '60s Rolling Stone interview, said: "Let me tell you this--when I came out, they weren't playing no black artists on no Top 40 stations. I was the first, but it took people like Elvis to open the door for this kind of music, and I thank God for Elvis Presley." As for the black community never accepting or liking Elvis, I guess that James Brown, Sammy Davis Jr., Muhammad Ali, Jackie Wilson, B.B. King, Eldridge Cleaver, Aaron Neville, Eddie Murphy and Howlin' Wolf are no longer considered part of that community?
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 1989
Regarding my comments in the Nov. 26 article "Experiencing Jimi Hendrix" and the letters to Calendar that followed: I did not mean to imply that the song "Machine Gun" related specifically to African-American soldiers or that Hendrix's "The Star Spangled Banner" had power only because Hendrix was black. What I was saying was that "The Star Spangled Banner" had power for me, as a black person, because of where the country was with civil rights and the anti-war effort. Every question that I was asked related to how Hendrix influenced me as a black musician coming up. If I had been asked other questions about his influence on white musicians, fashions or the like, I would have answered accordingly.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 26, 1989 | Claudia Puig, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Rock 'n' roll and rap musicians rallied across the street from the White House on Monday to protest groups they say want to censor their music. Attending the rally, held on the 200th anniversary of Congress sending the Bill of Rights to the states for ratification, were Joseph Simmons of the rap group Run-DMC and guitarist Vernon Reid of Living Colour. Statements from Frank Zappa and Bruce Springsteen were read.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 5, 1988 | DON SNOWDEN
Band: Living Colour. Personnel: Corey Glover, vocals; Vernon Reid, guitar; Muzz Skillings, bass; William Calhoun, drums. History: Born in London and raised in New York, group founder Reid first attracted attention in drummer Ronald Shannon Jackson's adventurous band the Decoding Society from 1980 to '85. He worked with renegade N.Y. punk/funk bands like the Contortions and Defunkt, played on albums by Mick Jagger and rap group Public Enemy, and cut a duet album with jazz guitarist Bill Frisell.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 1989
It is absurd to say Vernon Reid is "the best black guitarist since Jimi Hendrix" ("In Black, White and Living Colour," by Dennis Hunt, Jan. 22). You might as well say he is the best guitarist of a certain height. His musical skill cannot be measured in terms of his race. This is, I think, the very point he is trying to make in his interviews. Race may be an influence, but in the end, artistry springs from individuality. MARK CHAET Glendale
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