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Veronica Guerin

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ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 2003 | Kenneth Turan, Times Staff Writer
There's something terribly demoralizing about "Veronica Guerin," and it's not just that its subject, a crusading Irish journalist played by the protean Cate Blanchett, was murdered in Dublin in 1996 by criminals she was in the process of exposing. And it's not that what's on screen is more schlocky than satisfying. "Veronica Guerin" is far from the worst film you'll see this year, and it's far from the worst film its director, Joel Schumacher, has ever made. ("8MM" anyone? I thought not.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 2003 | Kenneth Turan, Times Staff Writer
There's something terribly demoralizing about "Veronica Guerin," and it's not just that its subject, a crusading Irish journalist played by the protean Cate Blanchett, was murdered in Dublin in 1996 by criminals she was in the process of exposing. And it's not that what's on screen is more schlocky than satisfying. "Veronica Guerin" is far from the worst film you'll see this year, and it's far from the worst film its director, Joel Schumacher, has ever made. ("8MM" anyone? I thought not.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 12, 2003 | Michael Dwyer, Special to The Times
Not for the first time, a Jerry Bruckheimer production is the Irish box-office champion of the year. The movie is not the swashbuckling "Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl," ranked seventh and rising, but what the hugely successful producer describes as one of his "small pictures" -- "Veronica Guerin."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 12, 2003 | Michael Dwyer, Special to The Times
Not for the first time, a Jerry Bruckheimer production is the Irish box-office champion of the year. The movie is not the swashbuckling "Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl," ranked seventh and rising, but what the hugely successful producer describes as one of his "small pictures" -- "Veronica Guerin."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 1999 | DAVID GRITTEN, David Gritten is a London-based writer and frequent contributor to Calendar
When a film is shot here these days--a common occurrence in this economic boomtown, where the Irish movie industry is enjoying a golden age--it tends to be a public event. The media are invited on set; passers-by are not discouraged from lingering to watch scenes being shot on city streets. But one film now being shot here is an exception. The scene: A drab industrial estate in a nondescript north Dublin suburb, not a pedestrian in view.
NEWS
July 6, 1996 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On a fine summer day, Veronica Guerin had to appear in traffic court in Naas, a town just outside this inviting capital, which is legendary for its lovely Georgian squares, graceful bridges and congenial pubs and restaurants. After Guerin, an award-winning journalist, paid a speeding fine, she was en route at 1 p.m. to discuss her next investigative report with her editor at the Sunday Independent newspaper. She stopped her sporty crimson Opel at a red light.
NEWS
March 16, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
A crime boss was acquitted of ordering the 1996 slaying of journalist Veronica Guerin, though the presiding judges said they had "grave suspicions" that he was responsible. A Special Criminal Court cleared John Gilligan, 48, on murder and weapons possession charges but convicted him on 11 counts related to running what was Ireland's biggest drug-smuggling operation. Gilligan received a 28-year sentence--the longest for a drug-related offense in Irish legal history.
NEWS
March 23, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
Ireland's appeals court quashed the conviction of a Dublin man imprisoned for life for the 1996 murder of Veronica Guerin, an investigative reporter whose gangland killing stunned the nation. Paul Ward, 37, who was imprisoned in 1998 on the evidence of his state-protected accomplice, Charles Bowden, had appealed on the grounds that Bowden, described in court as "an inveterate liar," was an unreliable witness.
BUSINESS
October 7, 2003 | Lorenza Munoz, Times Staff Writer
Responding to the Motion Picture Assn. of America's decision to prohibit studios from sending out copies of DVDs and videocassettes for awards consideration, DreamWorks Pictures will begin screening "House of Sand and Fog" for groups of film industry insiders more than a month before the picture's theatrical release date. The movie, DreamWorks' main Oscar contender this year, will begin screening at Laemmle's Music Hall on Nov. 14. Its scheduled release is Dec. 26.
NEWS
March 18, 2004 | Susan King
Dr. Seuss' The Cat in the Hat Mike Myers, Alec Baldwin Universal, $27 This big-budget version of the beloved Dr. Seuss book is far from the cat's meow. Though the production design, costumes and the animated title sequence beautifully capture the mood and style of the book, the script is a crude mess unfit for kiddie consumption. And Myers comes across as a feline version of the "Coffee Talk" character he created for "Saturday Night Live," and his cat quickly wears out all of his nine lives.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 1999 | DAVID GRITTEN, David Gritten is a London-based writer and frequent contributor to Calendar
When a film is shot here these days--a common occurrence in this economic boomtown, where the Irish movie industry is enjoying a golden age--it tends to be a public event. The media are invited on set; passers-by are not discouraged from lingering to watch scenes being shot on city streets. But one film now being shot here is an exception. The scene: A drab industrial estate in a nondescript north Dublin suburb, not a pedestrian in view.
NEWS
July 6, 1996 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On a fine summer day, Veronica Guerin had to appear in traffic court in Naas, a town just outside this inviting capital, which is legendary for its lovely Georgian squares, graceful bridges and congenial pubs and restaurants. After Guerin, an award-winning journalist, paid a speeding fine, she was en route at 1 p.m. to discuss her next investigative report with her editor at the Sunday Independent newspaper. She stopped her sporty crimson Opel at a red light.
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