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February 19, 1999 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's official. The much-ballyhooed merger between Verve Records and GRP is now a fait accompli. And the long-rumored label name--the Verve Music Group--instantly becomes the symbol for the world's largest jazz recording company. Four individual labels--Verve, GRP, Impulse! and Blue Thumb--each with a specific identity, will coexist under the Verve Music Group umbrella. Verve, with its large catalog and solid reputation, will focus on mainstream and traditional jazz.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 1999 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's official. The much-ballyhooed merger between Verve Records and GRP is now a fait accompli. And the long-rumored label name--the Verve Music Group--instantly becomes the symbol for the world's largest jazz recording company. Four individual labels--Verve, GRP, Impulse! and Blue Thumb--each with a specific identity, will coexist under the Verve Music Group umbrella. Verve, with its large catalog and solid reputation, will focus on mainstream and traditional jazz.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 1998 | Robert Hilburn, Robert Hilburn, The Times' pop music critic, can be reached by e-mail at robert.hilburn@latimes.com
The Verve's Richard Ashcroft, British rock's man of the moment, appears drained as he steps into a backstage room at the Brixton Academy concert hall on what should be a night of triumph. It's two hours before the Brit Awards, the English equivalent of the Grammys, start across town at the London Docklands Arena, and the Verve is the odds-on favorite to win best band and best album honors over such heralded rivals as Oasis, Radiohead and Prodigy.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 1998 | Robert Hilburn, Robert Hilburn, The Times' pop music critic, can be reached by e-mail at robert.hilburn@latimes.com
The Verve's Richard Ashcroft, British rock's man of the moment, appears drained as he steps into a backstage room at the Brixton Academy concert hall on what should be a night of triumph. It's two hours before the Brit Awards, the English equivalent of the Grammys, start across town at the London Docklands Arena, and the Verve is the odds-on favorite to win best band and best album honors over such heralded rivals as Oasis, Radiohead and Prodigy.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 7, 2000 | ELIZABETH JENSEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hoping to spur viewers to commit to watching a daunting 19 hours of Ken Burns' January documentary "Jazz," the powers behind the new PBS show have put together a marketing effort unusual for public television. John Middlebrook, a vice president at General Motors, the program's sole corporate underwriter, said GM hopes the marketing push, which includes both corporate and charitable tie-ins, "will become a model for other public broadcasting programs."
NEWS
September 21, 2006 | Lynne Heffley
Baby Loves Jazz: Go Baby Go! Verve Music Group CD: $9.97; ages 1 to 6 www.babylovesmusic.com Noted jazz artists -- among them keyboardist John Medeski (Medeski, Martin & Wood), soul singer Sharon Jones of the Dap Kings and trumpeter Steven Bernstein, leader of experimental jazz band Sex Mob -- add sizzle and funk to familiar nursery rhymes in this effervescent treat of an album.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 2013 | By Mikael Wood
Smokey Robinson is getting in on the duets album action. Following his appearance Wednesday night on "American Idol," the R&B legend announced Thursday that he's to release a set of all-star duets this fall through the Verve Music Group. The album will join a rash of such collections, including recent efforts from Tony Bennett, Reba McEntire and Lionel Richie. Paul Anka has one due out next month, while John Fogerty will unveil his in May. But wait! "Unlike any other duet-themed project produced to date," a statement insists, "this unique album will include all hits written by Robinson," and that certainly seems true enough: Pop & Hiss can't recall another duets record filled only with Robinson's songs.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 4, 2000 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Few parts of the world have produced more extraordinary musical talents than the West African countries of Mali and Guinea. A short list of the major artists from the region would have to include Oumou Sangare, Salif Keita, Mory Kante, Toumani Diabate and Ali Farka Toure. And there are dozens of others--all coming from an area with minimal recording technology. And they keep on coming.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 22, 1999 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Many of the jazz world's best artists carry on a career without help from major record labels. Case in point: saxophonist-flutist Lew Tabackin. Tabackin, who opened a three-day run at Steamers Cafe in Fullerton on Friday, is no stranger to high-profile recording companies, having released a handful of documents for Concord in this decade and, with wife Toshiko Akiyoshi's Jazz Orchestra, for Columbia in the 1980s.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 23, 2013 | By Mikael Wood, Los Angeles Times
Earlier this month Josh Groban's "All That Echoes" knocked Justin Bieber's new album out of the top spot on the Billboard 200, and that's not the crooner's only incursion into territory normally reserved for pop stars. The crossover artist's latest release features material by Stevie Wonder and Jimmy Webb, while a deluxe edition available at Target adds Groban's take on the Dave Matthews Band's frat-house staple "Satellite. " The album's producer? Rob Cavallo of Green Day and Adam Lambert fame.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 22, 2005 | Jon Thurber, Times Staff Writer
Shirley Horn, the Grammy-winning singer and pianist whose richly expressive vocal style made her one of the most popular performers in jazz, died Thursday night in Washington, D.C. She was 71. Horn died after a lengthy illness, the Verve Music Group, her record label, announced Friday. Horn lost her right foot to diabetes in 2001 and later much of her right leg. She had also battled breast cancer and arthritis over the last few years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 2010 | Keith Thursby
Abbey Lincoln, an acclaimed jazz singer, songwriter and actress who evolved from a supper-club singer into a strong voice for civil rights, has died. She was 80. Lincoln died Saturday in a nursing home in New York, said Evelyn Mason, her niece. No cause was given, but she had been in failing health. Lincoln built a career as an actress and singer in the late 1950s through the turbulent 1960s, then stepped away during the 1970s and, years later, returned to prominence as a singer praised for her songwriting abilities.
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