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NEWS
November 22, 2001 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It hasn't been an especially notable year for new jazz recordings, with a few exceptions. But we always know that when there's a lull in the current action, there's plenty in the catalog to revisit. Surveying the high points of 2001, in fact, results in a fairly even split between current material and reissues, all of it first-rate. * FOUR STARS **** WOODY HERMAN, "Woody Herman--Blowin' Up a Storm!," Columbia Legacy.
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NEWS
November 22, 2001 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It hasn't been an especially notable year for new jazz recordings, with a few exceptions. But we always know that when there's a lull in the current action, there's plenty in the catalog to revisit. Surveying the high points of 2001, in fact, results in a fairly even split between current material and reissues, all of it first-rate. * FOUR STARS **** WOODY HERMAN, "Woody Herman--Blowin' Up a Storm!," Columbia Legacy.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 1998 | Don Heckman
When trombonist J.J. Johnson, pianist Nat King Cole, guitarist Les Paul, tenor saxophonist Illinois Jacquet and others stepped on stage at Los Angeles' Philharmonic Auditorium in the summer of 1944, no one could have imagined that they were kicking off one of the most powerful series of concerts in jazz history.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 1998 | Don Heckman
When trombonist J.J. Johnson, pianist Nat King Cole, guitarist Les Paul, tenor saxophonist Illinois Jacquet and others stepped on stage at Los Angeles' Philharmonic Auditorium in the summer of 1944, no one could have imagined that they were kicking off one of the most powerful series of concerts in jazz history.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 1998 | Don Heckman
In 1966, the Duke Ellington Orchestra was in its last decade of glory. The personnel still included such legendary performers as saxophonists Johnny Hodges, Harry Carney, Paul Gonsalves, Jimmy Hamilton and Russell Procope; Cat Anderson and Cootie Williams were in the trumpet section; Lawrence Brown and Buster Cooper in the trombone section; and Sam Woodyard was anchoring the rhythm section on drums.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 1998 | Don Heckman
The use of the word "standard" to describe the lexicon of songs written in the first half of the century by writers such as Cole Porter, Jerome Kern, George Gershwin, Irving Berlin, Rodgers & Hart and others has a dual purpose. It reflects, first of all, that this material has become a part of the standard repertoire. Less obviously, it defines a collection of music that has become the standard against which to measure the work of different performers.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 10, 1991 | ZAN STEWART
*** Stephen Scott, "Something to Consider," Verve Records. While the 22-year-old modern mainstream pianist-composer--heard in solo, trio, quartet, quintet and sextet contexts--does not yet have his own voice either as soloist or composer, he's on his way. The album includes eight Scott originals--the spritely "Steps, Paths and Journeys" and delicate "No More Misunderstandings" stand out. The soloists--Joe Henderson, Roy Hargrove and Craig Handy, among them--add bite.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 1990 | CLAUDIA PUIG, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Cosby Watch: Bill Cosby issues the first in a series of jazz recordings this month for Verve/Polygram Records on which he is composer and producer and plays percussion. But he said he won't be surprised if the project is ignored by the folks at the Grammy Awards: "When you look at the way they set up the categories, you know from Jump Street that they don't know anything about what they are doing and they certainly don't know anything about what other people are doing," Cosby said.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 1994 | Don Heckman
BETTY CARTER "Feed the Fire" Verve Records * * * Carter deals in upfront statements. When she grapples with a song, as she frequently does here, there is no doubt about who will emerge victorious. Her interpretations of the familiar "Sometimes I'm Happy" and "Lover Man" twist the tunes to her own purposes.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 1996 | BILL KOHLHAASE
Art Porter, who drowned in a boating accident last Saturday in Thailand, was the rare jazz fusion saxophonist who played not only with energy but with integrity as well. The 35-year-old musician had just released his fourth album on the Verve label, "Lay Your Hands on Me," and was in Asia to perform at the Thailand International Jazz Festival '96. Porter, the son of the late Arkansas-based pianist Art Porter Sr., began playing drums in his church choir.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 1998 | Don Heckman
In 1966, the Duke Ellington Orchestra was in its last decade of glory. The personnel still included such legendary performers as saxophonists Johnny Hodges, Harry Carney, Paul Gonsalves, Jimmy Hamilton and Russell Procope; Cat Anderson and Cootie Williams were in the trumpet section; Lawrence Brown and Buster Cooper in the trombone section; and Sam Woodyard was anchoring the rhythm section on drums.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 1998 | Don Heckman
The use of the word "standard" to describe the lexicon of songs written in the first half of the century by writers such as Cole Porter, Jerome Kern, George Gershwin, Irving Berlin, Rodgers & Hart and others has a dual purpose. It reflects, first of all, that this material has become a part of the standard repertoire. Less obviously, it defines a collection of music that has become the standard against which to measure the work of different performers.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 1994 | Don Heckman
STAN GETZ, "Nobody Else but Me" ( Verve Records ) *** 1/2 Recorded in 1964, when Stan Getz's bossa nova playing had suddenly propelled him into commercial popularity, this set of tunes from his touring group of the time was never released. Apparently reluctant to risk undercutting the saxophonist's chart-topping success with jazz samba, Verve withheld an album that, ironically, contains some of Getz's most pure, straight-ahead jazz improvisations.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 1995 | Don Heckman
CHRISTIAN McBRIDE "Gettin' to It" Verve Records * * * 1/2 This is about as good as a debut album gets. Bassist McBride has accomplished most of his goals for his first outing as a leader, including an impressive display of composing skills, superb rhythm section playing and eloquent soloing. It also is an album that is simply great fun to hear--jazz that is exhilarating, animated and filled with the joy of music-making.
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