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NEWS
November 17, 2005
I read your interesting article on scooters ["Born to Be Styled," Nov. 10], particularly the Vespa brand. For some reason, scooters are synonymous with Vespa. I have been riding a Vespa for the last 35 years and I own a 1973 model. My children grew up riding this vehicle and, well, they are in your wonderful country today. The vehicle is simple, easy to ride and maneuver in Bangalore's crazy traffic. It is easy to park and get about your work without hunting for parking places. Finally, from a mileage and mechanical point of view, it is very reliable.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
February 5, 2014 | By Charles Fleming
The scooter market is an increasingly crowded and competitive segment of the U.S. motorcycle business. Going after the urban commuter dollar are everything from inexpensive rides like the Kymco Like to high-powered freeway fliers like the Suzuki Burgman to super deluxe $10,000 models like the Vespa 946. Honda is splitting the difference and aiming for the middle of the target with its 2014 Forza. LANE-SPLITTING CONTROVERSY: Guidelines from the CHP   Sharing some genetic material with Honda's earlier Helix and Reflex scooter lines, the Forza is a sleek, smart-looking 300cc unit that features smooth power, a liquid-cooled and fuel-injected engine, an optional anti-lock ABS braking system and capacious storage.
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BUSINESS
February 5, 2014 | By Charles Fleming
The scooter market is an increasingly crowded and competitive segment of the U.S. motorcycle business. Going after the urban commuter dollar are everything from inexpensive rides like the Kymco Like to high-powered freeway fliers like the Suzuki Burgman to super deluxe $10,000 models like the Vespa 946. Honda is splitting the difference and aiming for the middle of the target with its 2014 Forza. LANE-SPLITTING CONTROVERSY: Guidelines from the CHP   Sharing some genetic material with Honda's earlier Helix and Reflex scooter lines, the Forza is a sleek, smart-looking 300cc unit that features smooth power, a liquid-cooled and fuel-injected engine, an optional anti-lock ABS braking system and capacious storage.
BUSINESS
October 24, 2013 | By Charles Fleming
The legendary Italian motor-scooter company Piaggio has pulled the covers off the Vespa 946, its first all-new scooter model in six years. It could be an instant classic. Hand-built of welded steel and aluminum alloy in Piaggio's Pontedera factory, and "inspired by" the original MP6 Vespa prototype from 1946, this machine has classic Italian lines. The rear end looks like something off a vintage Bugatti. But this is no exercise in nostalgia. This is the first Vespa with ABS and electronic traction control.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 28, 1987
A 55-year-old La Crescenta woman was charged with felony manslaughter Sunday after her car slammed head-on into an 18-year-old moped rider, immediately killing him, police said. Ian Grant, 18, of Burbank, was pronounced dead at the scene of the accident on La Tuna Canyon Road, east of Elben Avenue, in Sun Valley, said Los Angeles Police Officer Joe Klorman. Charged was Barbara A. Fell, a liquor store clerk.
MAGAZINE
August 13, 1995
"Rubber (and Canvas) Soul" (by Ed Leibowitz, July 9) was supposed to be an enlightening slice of Gen-X life. At 26, I, too, prowl around swap meets looking for fine examples of my favorite collectibles. I dye my hair strange colors, wear strange clothes and own my own business, restoring vintage Vespa motor scooters. Am I not interesting enough to merit four pages in your magazine? Or am I disqualified because I don't like corduroy Levi's, work a dead-end job and live with my mom? If you must portray the "twenty-something" crowd, try to find someone or something interesting.
OPINION
July 6, 2011
Not to Al Gore anybody's ox, but a lot of you Whole Foods hipsters think you're green because your Prius gets 50 mpg. My scooter gets 100. I just filled up my tank on the way to work. Total cost: $3.86, about the same price as a Starbucks grande Frappuccino but fueling an adrenaline buzz that will last a lot longer. Scooters, in fact, could save the world. You don't like the noise pollution from all those souped-up motorcycles tearing through L.A.? My scooter purrs like a kitten.
IMAGE
September 10, 2010 | By Daina Beth Solomon, Los Angeles Times
Varoom! There goes another candy-colored streamlined Vespa zooming through downtown Los Angeles — this one in a tangerine hue. Oh, and there's one in cherry red. And pastel blue. Did you see the mint-green one with the white daisy decals buzz by? Since it opened last November on the border between Little Tokyo and the Arts District, Vespa of Los Angeles has encouraged downtown residents to travel the city by scooter — and in style. The Vespa, which was originally manufactured in 1946 and means "wasp" in Italian, is an iconic European style symbol, seen all over the streets of major cities such as Paris and Milan.
NEWS
November 20, 2000 | BOOTH MOORE
With retro so popular these days for everything from clothes to cars (PT Cruiser and VW Bug), the makers of the Vespa motorbike are hoping to revive interest in the iconic Italian motorbike. The wasp-shaped Vespa (the Italian word for the insect), was developed in 1946 by designer Enrico Piaggio as an affordable mode of transportation.
BUSINESS
October 24, 2013 | By Charles Fleming
The legendary Italian motor-scooter company Piaggio has pulled the covers off the Vespa 946, its first all-new scooter model in six years. It could be an instant classic. Hand-built of welded steel and aluminum alloy in Piaggio's Pontedera factory, and "inspired by" the original MP6 Vespa prototype from 1946, this machine has classic Italian lines. The rear end looks like something off a vintage Bugatti. But this is no exercise in nostalgia. This is the first Vespa with ABS and electronic traction control.
BUSINESS
March 26, 2013 | By Charles Fleming
The last time I was in Rome I saw a young man in linen shorts and wraparound sunglasses, talking on a cellphone and smoking a cigarette while riding a Vespa, moving fast down a narrow street in the direction of the Piazza Navona. Perhaps only an Italian can do that, and only in the Eternal City, but there is something timelessly cool about the classic Italian scooter. As a motorcycle snob, I never rode a scooter -- or wanted to. Give me horsepower and performance, I said. Scooters are for ... amateurs.
OPINION
July 6, 2011
Not to Al Gore anybody's ox, but a lot of you Whole Foods hipsters think you're green because your Prius gets 50 mpg. My scooter gets 100. I just filled up my tank on the way to work. Total cost: $3.86, about the same price as a Starbucks grande Frappuccino but fueling an adrenaline buzz that will last a lot longer. Scooters, in fact, could save the world. You don't like the noise pollution from all those souped-up motorcycles tearing through L.A.? My scooter purrs like a kitten.
IMAGE
September 10, 2010 | By Daina Beth Solomon, Los Angeles Times
Varoom! There goes another candy-colored streamlined Vespa zooming through downtown Los Angeles — this one in a tangerine hue. Oh, and there's one in cherry red. And pastel blue. Did you see the mint-green one with the white daisy decals buzz by? Since it opened last November on the border between Little Tokyo and the Arts District, Vespa of Los Angeles has encouraged downtown residents to travel the city by scooter — and in style. The Vespa, which was originally manufactured in 1946 and means "wasp" in Italian, is an iconic European style symbol, seen all over the streets of major cities such as Paris and Milan.
NEWS
November 17, 2005
I read your interesting article on scooters ["Born to Be Styled," Nov. 10], particularly the Vespa brand. For some reason, scooters are synonymous with Vespa. I have been riding a Vespa for the last 35 years and I own a 1973 model. My children grew up riding this vehicle and, well, they are in your wonderful country today. The vehicle is simple, easy to ride and maneuver in Bangalore's crazy traffic. It is easy to park and get about your work without hunting for parking places. Finally, from a mileage and mechanical point of view, it is very reliable.
NEWS
September 18, 2002 | HILARY E. MacGREGOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On a recent morning, Gary Newman set off for work from his Studio City home on his chromed-out Vespa. He tucked his colorful tie into his sweater and strapped on his helmet. As he sped by a local golf course, men turned to watch. When he stopped, they crowded around like young boys to take a look. "You need a beautiful woman on the back," yelled one man. "With her hands in the air ... like this!"
NEWS
March 14, 2001 | JASON DIETRICH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Ask anyone who's ever ridden one and they'll tell you it's all about the feeling of wind on your face, the hair-dryer whine of the engine and the road whizzing by under wheelbarrow-size tires. After a generation removed from the American market, the Vespa scooter, retooled and in eight candy-store colors from bright red to pastel green, is back. Italian manufacturer Piaggio pulled the line from North America in 1983, citing its inability to meet California's stringent air-quality regulations.
MAGAZINE
June 20, 1999 | Jason Dietrich
They putter playfully across IBM billboards high above the Sunset Strip. They pester SUV owners in Toyota commercials. Supermodels conspicuously straddle them in ads. While the Vespa motor scooter hasn't been sold Stateside since the early '80s, the plucky little two-wheeler is the advertising industry's new darling. "Open any issue of Vogue," says Derek Olry, owner of the Santa Ana shop Scooter Cafe, "and there'll be two or three scooters inside.
NEWS
November 20, 2000 | BOOTH MOORE
With retro so popular these days for everything from clothes to cars (PT Cruiser and VW Bug), the makers of the Vespa motorbike are hoping to revive interest in the iconic Italian motorbike. The wasp-shaped Vespa (the Italian word for the insect), was developed in 1946 by designer Enrico Piaggio as an affordable mode of transportation.
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