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SCIENCE
September 7, 2012 | By Thomas H. Maugh II
 After orbiting the giant asteroid Vesta for slightly more than 13 months, NASA's Dawn spacecraft left the space rock this week, headed for the dwarf planet Ceres. The craft is using a highly efficient ion thruster to spiral gently away from Vesta. In the system, electricity ionizes gaseous xenon and expels it to produce thrust. The engine is much less powerful than conventional rocket engines, but can operate for months at a time. The craft is expected to reach Ceres in early 2015.
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BUSINESS
January 22, 2013 | By Frank Shyong, Los Angeles Times
A group of private entrepreneurs is raising $20 million to fund the first stage of a mission to identify asteroids close to Earth and mine them for valuable materials. Deep Space Industries plans to launch three small crafts armed with cameras, called Fireflies, on an asteroid discovery mission as early as 2015. Three more spacecrafts, called Dragonflies, are expected to launch in 2016 to collect samples to be evaluated for mining potential. Planetary Resources, a Seattle company that launched its asteroid-mining operation last year, is developing a space telescope for spaceflight soon.
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SCIENCE
May 10, 2012 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times
NASA'sfirst hard look at the protoplanet Vesta has given scientists an unprecedented view of its makeup, terrain and history - and revealed that major activity on this ancient rock occurred far more recently than researchers had expected. Images sent back from NASA's trailblazing Dawn spacecraft reveal the full size of a massive crater in the southern hemisphere and indicate that it may have been made just 1 billion years ago, well after Vesta formed more than 4.5 billion years ago, according to one of half a dozen studies published in Friday's edition of the journal Science.
SCIENCE
January 20, 2013 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times
The cold, dead asteroid Vesta might have had a very active inner life early in the solar system's history, according to an unusual analysis of a Saharan meteorite. Vesta might have had a magma ocean underneath its rocky exterior, allowing bits of mineral to rise and fall between softer and harder layers of material, according to a study published online Sunday by the journal Nature Geoscience. If confirmed, that would make it more like Earth and the solar system's other rocky planets than scientists had realized.
SCIENCE
January 20, 2013 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times
The cold, dead asteroid Vesta might have had a very active inner life early in the solar system's history, according to an unusual analysis of a Saharan meteorite. Vesta might have had a magma ocean underneath its rocky exterior, allowing bits of mineral to rise and fall between softer and harder layers of material, according to a study published online Sunday by the journal Nature Geoscience. If confirmed, that would make it more like Earth and the solar system's other rocky planets than scientists had realized.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 24, 2011 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
NASA's pioneering Dawn spacecraft, a year late in being launched and 20% over budget, is slowly creeping up on the protoplanet Vesta and is expected to enter orbit around it about July 16, the first stop on a remarkable journey that will later take the craft to the larger dwarf planet Ceres. The craft, the largest probe ever launched by NASA, is about half-way through its three-month approach phase to Vesta, 96,000 miles away and closing in at the sedate speed of about 260 mph. The whole procedure is happening so slowly, in terms of normal asteroid flybys and planetary encounters, that scientists at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in La Cañada Flintridge will not be able to calculate precisely when the craft entered orbit until after the fact.
BUSINESS
January 22, 2013 | By Frank Shyong, Los Angeles Times
A group of private entrepreneurs is raising $20 million to fund the first stage of a mission to identify asteroids close to Earth and mine them for valuable materials. Deep Space Industries plans to launch three small crafts armed with cameras, called Fireflies, on an asteroid discovery mission as early as 2015. Three more spacecrafts, called Dragonflies, are expected to launch in 2016 to collect samples to be evaluated for mining potential. Planetary Resources, a Seattle company that launched its asteroid-mining operation last year, is developing a space telescope for spaceflight soon.
NATIONAL
September 5, 2012 | By Amy Hubbard
The spacecraft Dawn has been visiting Vesta, an Arizona-sized chunk of lumpy rock in the asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter. Now the NASA spacecraft will head to the dwarf planet Ceres. As the Associated Press reports, Dawn orbited Vesta for a year, taking photos and using various instruments to explore the asteroid from as close as 130 miles. But NASA isn't done with asteroids. Today the space agency launched a name-the-asteroid contest as efforts geared up to bring a piece of an asteroid home to Earth.  And we're not talking just any asteroid.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 1986
The Woman's Building will honor 10 women for their contributions to the Southern California arts community when it presents its Vesta Awards from noon to 3 p.m. Oct. 19 at the Westin Bonaventure Hotel. The winners are Ray Eames for design arts; Cheri Gaulke, performance art; Elyse Grinstein and Lydia Takeshita, community support; Ruth Hirschman, media arts; Meredith MacRae, broadcast journalism; Phranc, music; Ruth Waddy and Beatrice Wood for visual arts, and Carmen Zapata for theater.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 1988
Nine women will be recognized for their contributions to the arts in Southern California on Sunday at the seventh annual Vesta Awards sponsored by the Woman's Building. The award winners are Sheila Levrant de Bretteville, design; Linda Mabalot, media; Marian Post Wolcott, visual arts; Lula Washington, dance; Wanda Coleman, writing; Cecile McCann, journalism; Marija Gimbutas, scholarship; and Merry Norris and Sister Karen Boccalero, community support. The noon-3 p.m.
SCIENCE
October 31, 2012 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
The giant asteroid Vesta, sometimes known as a proto-planet, has a surface unlike any other airless body previously observed. While Earth's moon and other airless bodies are generally a relatively uniform gray, Vesta's bright background is streaked with large amounts of a much darker substance. New results from the Dawn probe indicate that the black material is largely carbon that has been deposited by other, smaller asteroids. The moon and other airless bodies like it exhibit a form of weathering, even though the lack of an atmosphere prevents weather as we know it. Over billions of years, the bodies have become gray as a result of exposure to the solar wind and bombardment by micrometeorites.
SCIENCE
September 21, 2012 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times
An up-close look at the protoplanet Vesta taken by the Dawn spacecraft reveals signs of water on this oversized asteroid in the middle of the solar system, scientists reported Thursday in the journal Science. Vesta floats in the middle of the asteroid belt that fills the gap between the orbits of Mars and Jupiter. That doughnut of rocky rubble might have coalesced into a whole planet if Jupiter's gravity hadn't gotten in the way. Instead, Vesta's growth was stunted at the protoplanet stage.
SCIENCE
September 7, 2012 | By Thomas H. Maugh II
 After orbiting the giant asteroid Vesta for slightly more than 13 months, NASA's Dawn spacecraft left the space rock this week, headed for the dwarf planet Ceres. The craft is using a highly efficient ion thruster to spiral gently away from Vesta. In the system, electricity ionizes gaseous xenon and expels it to produce thrust. The engine is much less powerful than conventional rocket engines, but can operate for months at a time. The craft is expected to reach Ceres in early 2015.
NATIONAL
September 5, 2012 | By Amy Hubbard
The spacecraft Dawn has been visiting Vesta, an Arizona-sized chunk of lumpy rock in the asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter. Now the NASA spacecraft will head to the dwarf planet Ceres. As the Associated Press reports, Dawn orbited Vesta for a year, taking photos and using various instruments to explore the asteroid from as close as 130 miles. But NASA isn't done with asteroids. Today the space agency launched a name-the-asteroid contest as efforts geared up to bring a piece of an asteroid home to Earth.  And we're not talking just any asteroid.
SCIENCE
May 10, 2012 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times
NASA'sfirst hard look at the protoplanet Vesta has given scientists an unprecedented view of its makeup, terrain and history - and revealed that major activity on this ancient rock occurred far more recently than researchers had expected. Images sent back from NASA's trailblazing Dawn spacecraft reveal the full size of a massive crater in the southern hemisphere and indicate that it may have been made just 1 billion years ago, well after Vesta formed more than 4.5 billion years ago, according to one of half a dozen studies published in Friday's edition of the journal Science.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 2011
Vesta Williams Singer of R&B hits in 1980s Vesta Williams, 53, an R&B singer who had hits in the 1980s with "Once Bitten Twice Shy" and "Congratulations," was found dead Thursday evening of a possible drug overdose in an El Segundo hotel room. An autopsy will determine the cause of death, according to Los Angeles County coroner's officials, but they said a drug overdose is suspected. Born Mary Vesta Williams in Coshocton, Ohio, on Dec. 1, 1957, she had hits with "Don't Blow A Good Thing," "Sweet, Sweet Love" and the torch song "Congratulations," in which she emotionally bids goodbye to her ex, about to marry someone else, on his wedding day. Besides her solo work, she was a member of the singing group Wild Honey and was a backup singer for Chaka Khan, Gladys Knight, Anita Baker and others.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 1985
Twelve women artists and arts supporters will be honored by the Woman's Building at its fourth annual Vesta Awards brunch Oct. 20 at noon at the Westin Bonaventure Hotel. Award recipients are sculptor Claire Falkenstein; choreographer Bella Lewitzky; stage producer Peg Yorkin; Margarita Galban, artistic director of the Bilingual Foundation of the Arts; poet Eloise Klein Healy; news reporter Inez Pedrosa; performance artist Eleanor Antin; book artist Susan E.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 2002
Vesta Roy, 76, the first Republican woman to serve as governor of a state, died Saturday at her home in Kenmore, N.Y. The cause of death was not announced. Roy was not elected but served for seven days as chief executive of New Hampshire after the death of Gov. Hugh Gallen in 1982. As president of the state Senate, she had served as acting governor for a month while Gallen was hospitalized with liver and kidney failure, which ultimately brought about his death. Roy served until John H.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 24, 2011 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
NASA's pioneering Dawn spacecraft, a year late in being launched and 20% over budget, is slowly creeping up on the protoplanet Vesta and is expected to enter orbit around it about July 16, the first stop on a remarkable journey that will later take the craft to the larger dwarf planet Ceres. The craft, the largest probe ever launched by NASA, is about half-way through its three-month approach phase to Vesta, 96,000 miles away and closing in at the sedate speed of about 260 mph. The whole procedure is happening so slowly, in terms of normal asteroid flybys and planetary encounters, that scientists at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in La Cañada Flintridge will not be able to calculate precisely when the craft entered orbit until after the fact.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 2002
Vesta Roy, 76, the first Republican woman to serve as governor of a state, died Saturday at her home in Kenmore, N.Y. The cause of death was not announced. Roy was not elected but served for seven days as chief executive of New Hampshire after the death of Gov. Hugh Gallen in 1982. As president of the state Senate, she had served as acting governor for a month while Gallen was hospitalized with liver and kidney failure, which ultimately brought about his death. Roy served until John H.
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