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Vesuvius

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ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 2005 | Daryl H. Miller, Times Staff Writer
Since excavation of Pompeii in the 18th century, the lost city has seized people's imaginations -- how in AD 79, the explosion of volcanic Mt. Vesuvius rained ash on the populace, interring thousands. That sense of something falling from the sky and cementing people in place is a central metaphor in Lucinda Coxon's "Vesuvius," which opened over the weekend at South Coast Repertory.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 2014 | By Gary Goldstein
Part sword-and-sandal spectacle, part disaster epic, "Pompeii" accomplishes its ambitious agenda to largely engrossing effect. Sure, it's not the brainiest of outings, but director Paul W.S. Anderson (the man behind four of the "Resident Evil" films) keeps the action apace and the lava a-flowing with workmanlike energy and sufficient visual dazzle. Set in AD 79, immediately before and during the cataclysmic eruption of southern Italy's Mt. Vesuvius, the script by Janet Scott Batchler & Lee Batchler and Michael Robert Johnson places a star-crossed romance at the center of one of the ancient world's most legendary calamities.
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NEWS
December 1, 1991 | JOHN FOLLAIN, REUTERS
On the slopes of Mt. Vesuvius, a once-glittering Medici palace bears sad witness to the Mafia's relentless grip over the impoverished hinterland of Naples. Its present owner: Raffaele Cutolo, Italy's most notorious gangster, now languishing in prison. Fighting to rescue and restore the decaying palace: Prince Giovan Battista de Medici, descendant of the Florentine dynasty that built it in the 16th Century. "Cutolo is ready to see it fall apart brick by brick.
WORLD
February 6, 2013 | By Tom Kington
ROME -- Conservation work at the crumbling ancient Roman city of Pompeii began Wednesday, a day after police announced a corruption probe into previous restoration work at the site. The new preservation campaign, funded in part by $142 million from the European Union, follows a series of structural collapses at the popular tourist site near Naples -- including at the House of Gladiators, a building used for training the arena warriors, which collapsed into a heap of rubble in 2010.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 2009 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, ART CRITIC
With the possible exception of Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal, everybody loves a good volcano story. The explosion! The lava flow! The ash cloud! Unspeakable death and destruction! The violent drama is exciting. Even Andy Warhol painted Mt. Vesuvius as an imagined explosion of lime green, hot pink, searing orange, putrid purple and raging red colors. Fortunately, that trashy 1985 painting is not included in "Pompeii and the Roman Villa: Art and Culture Around the Bay of Naples," the absorbing exhibition of ancient art that opened Sunday at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. Warhol painted nothing that wasn't already famous (or infamous)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2006 | David Pagel, Special to The Times
Suburban sprawl did not begin in Los Angeles. Showmanship did not originate in Las Vegas. And kitschy decor has been around a lot longer than the tacky McMansions that seem to be popping up on the best lots everywhere. All three flourished on the Bay of Naples for a couple of centuries before Vesuvius erupted in AD 79, burying Pompeii and ruining the market for beachfront property for miles around.
SPORTS
May 17, 2008
The desperate attempt to gain better yield from the tepid dividends on the David Beckham investment has led to exaggerated publicity on even the most trivial areas of his activities on or off the soccer field. An assist, a nifty move, however inconsequential, or his support for some African cause is trumpeted to be the sure sign of the soccer messiah. And if he does score a goal, however rare an event, Mt. Vesuvius couldn't match with its best explosion the resulting spectacle in the local press.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 2014 | By Gary Goldstein
Part sword-and-sandal spectacle, part disaster epic, "Pompeii" accomplishes its ambitious agenda to largely engrossing effect. Sure, it's not the brainiest of outings, but director Paul W.S. Anderson (the man behind four of the "Resident Evil" films) keeps the action apace and the lava a-flowing with workmanlike energy and sufficient visual dazzle. Set in AD 79, immediately before and during the cataclysmic eruption of southern Italy's Mt. Vesuvius, the script by Janet Scott Batchler & Lee Batchler and Michael Robert Johnson places a star-crossed romance at the center of one of the ancient world's most legendary calamities.
WORLD
February 6, 2013 | By Tom Kington
ROME -- Conservation work at the crumbling ancient Roman city of Pompeii began Wednesday, a day after police announced a corruption probe into previous restoration work at the site. The new preservation campaign, funded in part by $142 million from the European Union, follows a series of structural collapses at the popular tourist site near Naples -- including at the House of Gladiators, a building used for training the arena warriors, which collapsed into a heap of rubble in 2010.
SCIENCE
March 11, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
The preserved footprints and abandoned homes of villagers who fled a giant eruption of Mt. Vesuvius 3,800 years ago show the volcano could destroy modern-day Naples with little warning, Italian and U.S. researchers reported Monday. The eruption buried entire villages as far as 15 miles from the volcano, cooking people as they tried to escape and dumping several feet of ash and mud.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 2009 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, ART CRITIC
With the possible exception of Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal, everybody loves a good volcano story. The explosion! The lava flow! The ash cloud! Unspeakable death and destruction! The violent drama is exciting. Even Andy Warhol painted Mt. Vesuvius as an imagined explosion of lime green, hot pink, searing orange, putrid purple and raging red colors. Fortunately, that trashy 1985 painting is not included in "Pompeii and the Roman Villa: Art and Culture Around the Bay of Naples," the absorbing exhibition of ancient art that opened Sunday at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. Warhol painted nothing that wasn't already famous (or infamous)
SPORTS
May 17, 2008
The desperate attempt to gain better yield from the tepid dividends on the David Beckham investment has led to exaggerated publicity on even the most trivial areas of his activities on or off the soccer field. An assist, a nifty move, however inconsequential, or his support for some African cause is trumpeted to be the sure sign of the soccer messiah. And if he does score a goal, however rare an event, Mt. Vesuvius couldn't match with its best explosion the resulting spectacle in the local press.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2006 | David Pagel, Special to The Times
Suburban sprawl did not begin in Los Angeles. Showmanship did not originate in Las Vegas. And kitschy decor has been around a lot longer than the tacky McMansions that seem to be popping up on the best lots everywhere. All three flourished on the Bay of Naples for a couple of centuries before Vesuvius erupted in AD 79, burying Pompeii and ruining the market for beachfront property for miles around.
SCIENCE
March 11, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
The preserved footprints and abandoned homes of villagers who fled a giant eruption of Mt. Vesuvius 3,800 years ago show the volcano could destroy modern-day Naples with little warning, Italian and U.S. researchers reported Monday. The eruption buried entire villages as far as 15 miles from the volcano, cooking people as they tried to escape and dumping several feet of ash and mud.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 2005 | Daryl H. Miller, Times Staff Writer
Since excavation of Pompeii in the 18th century, the lost city has seized people's imaginations -- how in AD 79, the explosion of volcanic Mt. Vesuvius rained ash on the populace, interring thousands. That sense of something falling from the sky and cementing people in place is a central metaphor in Lucinda Coxon's "Vesuvius," which opened over the weekend at South Coast Repertory.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 2001 | TINA BORGATTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the past month, Bonnie Harris' sixth-grade class has been re-creating ancient civilizations out of sugar cubes, clay, pasta and papier-mache. On a 6-by-4-foot wooden board laid with model-train tracks, Harris' 31 students have built their own miniature versions of Mt. Olympus and the Acropolis, Mt. Vesuvius, the pyramids, the Taj Mahal and the Great Wall of China. One student even crafted a tiny sphinx out of clay for ancient Egypt. Another sculpted a sitting Buddha for the Taj Mahal.
NEWS
April 15, 1985 | Associated Press
A U.S. Navy seaman was killed Sunday when he fell more than 300 feet into the crater of 3,779-foot volcano Mt. Vesuvius, a Navy spokesman said. Another seaman from the destroyer Edward MacDonald remained stranded inside the volcano Sunday night but apparently was not injured, according to Lt. Cmdr. Skip Calvert, spokesman for naval support activity at Naples. The two seamen had been sightseeing Sunday afternoon when one man fell about 350 feet into the crater.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 2001
Three hundred residents of the Italian village of Herculaneum took refuge in a boathouse when Vesuvius erupted in AD 79, but their efforts were for naught. A cloud of superheated ash swept over them, killing them so quickly that they could not even raise their arms in a typical defensive reaction, Italian researchers report in today's Nature.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 2001
Three hundred residents of the Italian village of Herculaneum took refuge in a boathouse when Vesuvius erupted in AD 79, but their efforts were for naught. A cloud of superheated ash swept over them, killing them so quickly that they could not even raise their arms in a typical defensive reaction, Italian researchers report in today's Nature.
NEWS
December 1, 1991 | JOHN FOLLAIN, REUTERS
On the slopes of Mt. Vesuvius, a once-glittering Medici palace bears sad witness to the Mafia's relentless grip over the impoverished hinterland of Naples. Its present owner: Raffaele Cutolo, Italy's most notorious gangster, now languishing in prison. Fighting to rescue and restore the decaying palace: Prince Giovan Battista de Medici, descendant of the Florentine dynasty that built it in the 16th Century. "Cutolo is ready to see it fall apart brick by brick.
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