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NEWS
July 18, 1989
Veterans Affairs Secretary Edward J. Derwinski asked Congress to create a commission to conduct the first review of veterans health care in 25 years and make a "take-it-or-leave-it" recommendation. Derwinski carefully excluded the possibility of hospital closings, talking only of "changing missions" and the like.
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BUSINESS
December 11, 2009 | David Lazarus
As the head of a Los Angeles nonprofit organization that bills itself as "the nation's largest public health plan," Howard Kahn knows a thing or two about public options for health insurance. And he gives cautious approval to the compromise plan unveiled in the Senate last week to break the logjam on healthcare reform and steer negotiations into the homestretch. The Senate proposal, which is still a work in progress, would forgo a purely public insurance plan in favor of a government-administered program offered by private insurers.
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NEWS
November 21, 1998
The Veterans Health Administration has established a toll-free hotline for information about new eligibility guidelines that expand medical benefits to millions of former military personnel. Under eligibility changes that took effect Oct. 1, virtually all veterans will be able to get outpatient care, prescription medicines and a full range of medical benefits. Previously, such programs were guaranteed only to veterans with low incomes or those with 50% or greater service-connected disabilities.
NATIONAL
January 2, 2007 | From the Associated Press
A groundbreaking study of 1,946 male veterans of World War II and Korea suggests that vets with symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder are at greater risk of heart attacks as they age. The new study is the first to document a link between PTSD symptoms and future heart disease, and joins existing evidence that vets with PTSD also have more autoimmune diseases such as arthritis and psoriasis.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 1998 | PETER M. WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Veterans Health Administration has established a toll-free hotline for information about new eligibility guidelines that expand medical benefits to millions of former military personnel. Under eligibility changes that took effect Oct. 1, virtually all qualified veterans will be able to get outpatient care, prescription medicines and a full range of medical benefits.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 1989 | DAVID HALDANE, Times Staff Writer
Two buildings at the Long Beach Veterans Affairs Medical Center offer a study in contrasts. One of them, built in 1967, houses as many as 160 patients with spinal cord injuries. Here, resting in drab wards of seven beds each, men and women in wheelchairs struggle toward health in quarters that are noisy and crowded. Less than 130 feet away at the end of a corridor, meanwhile, is the sleek new 140,000-square-foot Ernest Bors Spinal Cord Injury Center, which is twice the size of the older ward.
NEWS
August 25, 1988 | Associated Press
Democratic vice presidential candidate Lloyd Bentsen, a decorated World War II bomber pilot, was interrupted four times by booing today when he told veterans that Michael S. Dukakis "can be trusted" to maintain the nation's defense. "I have been in the cross-hairs of the enemies of freedom," the 67-year-old senator told a Veterans of Foreign Wars convention. "I have been there. And I yield to no person or party in my passion for freedom." Republicans, Sen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 1999
In a March 30 editorial, "Middle Ground in VA Reform," The Times criticized the decisive and preemptive actions taken by the Department of Veterans Affairs to suspend biomedical research at the VA Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System for "indiscriminately banning research at a particular hospital." It is regrettable that The Times ignored information it had regarding the reasons for VA's concern over management of all aspects of the VAGLAHS research program, not just the human research component.
NEWS
May 27, 1991 | JOANNA M. MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Richard Jenkins recalls staring with wide-eyed wonder as one gigantic mushroom cloud after another fanned into the blue skies above the West Pacific's Marshall Islands 33 years ago. At the time, Jenkins, now a custom boat builder, did not realize that the explosions would cast a pall over his life.
NEWS
May 12, 1988 | JANNY SCOTT, Times Medical Writer
The most comprehensive study ever done of the physical and mental health of Vietnam veterans has concluded that they have been no less successful in adjusting to employment, marriage and civilian life than veterans who never served in that war. The federal report, released Wednesday, found Vietnam veterans somewhat more likely to suffer from anxiety, depression and alcohol dependence or abuse.
NATIONAL
July 1, 2005 | From Associated Press
A unanimous House agreed late Thursday to immediately provide nearly $1 billion in supplemental funding for veterans healthcare in a swift answer to the White House call for lawmakers to plug a politically embarrassing shortfall. The House voted 419 to 0 to approve a measure to close the funding gap that was disclosed last week to lawmakers.
OPINION
November 29, 2002
I congratulate Jonathan Turley for having the courage to tell the truth about what is happening to military retiree health care (Commentary, Nov. 25). While military retirees are being kicked out of the Pentagon's Army, Navy and Air Force hospitals, the president's pets in the White House are eligible for health care from the Army. And let us not forget about the Congress and congressional staff members who receive health care on Capitol Hill from the Navy. Turley's commentary should be a major topic on every major news network.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 2001 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He can't march anymore. Roy Burch doesn't have any legs. But nobody was standing taller on Memorial Day than the World War II veteran. Gov. Gray Davis, a pair of generals and a crowd of 2,000 were nearby at the Los Angeles National Cemetery in Westwood to salute those who have fought for the United States. Burch, 76, was on a hilltop a quarter-mile away, as close as he could get. He was sitting in a wheelchair outside a Veterans Affairs hospital building where he lives.
NEWS
November 28, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Symptoms such as memory loss and dizziness suffered by U.S. veterans with Persian Gulf War syndrome can be correlated to specific areas of the brain where cells have died, probably from chemical exposure, researchers said. Brain scans performed on victims of the syndrome have shown depleted brain cells in three areas.
NEWS
October 28, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
The Pentagon is reversing itself on who was exposed to nerve gas during the Persian Gulf War and who wasn't. About 30,000 Gulf War veterans are soon to be notified that they probably came in contact with low levels of sarin nerve gas after being told in 1997 that they had escaped exposure. And 30,000 believed to have been exposed will get letters saying they probably weren't.
NEWS
May 31, 2000 | From Associated Press
In a groundbreaking program, the nation's veterans hospitals hired NASA on Tuesday to do for medical safety what it does for airline safety: Set up a system where errors can be reported without fear of penalty and use the information to make everyone safer. A NASA-run program that lets pilots report near collisions is widely considered so successful at improving aviation safety that the Department of Veterans Affairs wants a similar program to combat medical mistakes.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 1992 | JUDITH MICHAELSON, Judith Michaelson is a Times staff writer. and
It is a night when the audience is but another character in the movie. At a screening for "Article 99, " which deals with abuses and bravery inside a veterans hospital, some are in jungle camouflage fatigues like those they wore in Vietnam. Others sport berets with service pins. A World War II veteran who was at Normandy on D-Day is in a wheelchair; he suffered a stroke two years ago. A victim of Agent Orange walks with a cane.
NEWS
October 3, 1992
Thank God for Gregory Kingsley (now Russ), who sued to end the parental rights of his birth mother, and to be adopted by his foster family. We now realize that children have rights under the law like the rest of us do. Some 12-year-olds like Gregory know their self-interest better than many adults who would decide for them. Children are naturally reticent to expose an abusive parent, no matter how painful things are.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 1999
In a March 30 editorial, "Middle Ground in VA Reform," The Times criticized the decisive and preemptive actions taken by the Department of Veterans Affairs to suspend biomedical research at the VA Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System for "indiscriminately banning research at a particular hospital." It is regrettable that The Times ignored information it had regarding the reasons for VA's concern over management of all aspects of the VAGLAHS research program, not just the human research component.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 1999 | TERENCE MONMANEY, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
The U.S. House of Representatives has opened an investigation of clinical research problems at the Veterans Affairs medical center in West Los Angeles. Two House subcommittees overseeing veterans issues are probing events leading to the unprecedented research shutdown last week at the VA West Los Angeles Healthcare Center, the nation's largest VA medical facility.
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