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Veterans Russia

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July 19, 1993 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If you want to know how bad morale is in the Russian army, ask Vladimir Mysenko, the mustachioed, barrel-chested commandant of the shrinking garrison of paratroopers here. Does he feel betrayed by his government? "It's not a feeling, it's a fact," he blusters, openly convinced that his 26 years of service to the Soviet army have all gone for naught.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 5, 1997
Hundreds of Russian World War II veterans today will commemorate the estimated 20 million Russians who died in the conflict. More than 100,000 former residents of the Soviet Union live in the Southland, with many residing in West Hollywood, said Efin Kutz, a founder of the 20-year-old L.A. Russian Veterans Assn., which is sponsoring a 1 p.m. event at Fiesta Hall at Plummer Park, 7377 Santa Monica Blvd. "This is how we get together and remember what happened," he said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 5, 1997
Hundreds of Russian World War II veterans today will commemorate the estimated 20 million Russians who died in the conflict. More than 100,000 former residents of the Soviet Union live in the Southland, with many residing in West Hollywood, said Efin Kutz, a founder of the 20-year-old L.A. Russian Veterans Assn., which is sponsoring a 1 p.m. event at Fiesta Hall at Plummer Park, 7377 Santa Monica Blvd. "This is how we get together and remember what happened," he said.
NEWS
July 19, 1993 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If you want to know how bad morale is in the Russian army, ask Vladimir Mysenko, the mustachioed, barrel-chested commandant of the shrinking garrison of paratroopers here. Does he feel betrayed by his government? "It's not a feeling, it's a fact," he blusters, openly convinced that his 26 years of service to the Soviet army have all gone for naught.
WORLD
March 17, 2004 | Kim Murphy, Times Staff Writer
Police said Tuesday that they were searching for two homeless men who might have stolen gas valves from an apartment building in northern Russia, leading to a huge predawn explosion that left at least 32 people dead. But a municipal official said the utility lines in Arkhangelsk, 600 miles north of Moscow, were so poorly maintained that simple deterioration could have caused the tragedy. At least 11 residents remained unaccounted for, and 24 others were injured, seven critically.
MAGAZINE
November 17, 2002 | MARK EHRMAN
Is chivalry dead? Not for Sir Edward Artis, self-styled Knight of Malta. The Vietnam paramedic-turned-humanitarian swashbuckler has spent 30-plus years taking donated food, medicine and other supplies into the planet's hairiest hot spots. Be it Kosovo, Rwanda, Chechnya or Afghanistan, the nonprofit Knightsbridge International, of which Artis is a member, is over the border before more bureaucratic nongovernmental organizations have drafted their proposals.
WORLD
March 1, 2012 | By Sergei L. Loiko, Los Angeles Times
  It was not just another day on Alexei Burkov's little dairy farm west of Moscow. In a country where political campaigns are conducted with scripted television events and carefully orchestrated public appearances, a presidential candidate was coming to share a hearty winter lunch of homemade dumplings, pork chops, herb-seasoned cheeses and a raspberry drink. To the delight of half a dozen photographers, Mikhail Prokhorov, the billionaire owner of the New Jersey Nets NBA basketball team, visited Burkov's barn and awkwardly touched the horn of one of his cows.
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