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September 21, 1997 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sometimes in the night, Be Van Nhop hears a voice that calls out from the next room, "Rush forward, comrades! The enemy's everywhere!" and Nhop will answer softly: "Be still, Tran. You are having a bad dream. Be still." Tran falls silent, and the next morning he has forgotten the nightmare.
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NEWS
September 21, 1997 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sometimes in the night, Be Van Nhop hears a voice that calls out from the next room, "Rush forward, comrades! The enemy's everywhere!" and Nhop will answer softly: "Be still, Tran. You are having a bad dream. Be still." Tran falls silent, and the next morning he has forgotten the nightmare.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 1988
Latino veterans of the Vietnam War got their first official memorial Wednesday when residents of the Boyle Heights community dedicated a new pedestrian mall in their honor. More than 300 people, including several Latino veterans of the conflict, stood by as the Paseo de las Flores Pedestrian Promenade was officially opened to the public.
NEWS
December 18, 1995 | NORA ZAMICHOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. Maj. Gen. William L. Nash came of age as a soldier during the Cold War, when being sent into action meant killing the enemy. But now, Nash, who has served in two wars, will lead 20,000 U.S. soldiers--as well as 1,500 Russian troops--to prevent bloodshed and protect a newborn peace in Bosnia-Herzegovina. "It is the irony of all ironies," said Nash, puffing a cheap cigar in a rare interview at his home one recent morning with two cocker spaniels, Humphrey and Bogart, snoring by his feet.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 1995 | GEORGE RAMOS
Ruben Treviso has been an energetic fighter for veterans ever since he came back from Vietnam in 1971. He's been involved in numerous projects in Greater L.A. to honor vets in recent years, ranging from seeking more visible war monuments to honor America's dead to seeking money so that a vet can write of his war experiences and close that chapter of his life. Treviso, 49, does some of this work on his own time, believing it's the very least that can be done for veterans.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 28, 1995 | JEFF SCHNAUFER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Along a lonely road strewn with drying rice, Vietnam veteran Michael Liscio halted as he reached the fishing village of My Lai, the one stop he felt he had to make. He had been warned he would not be welcome in the place where U. S. soldiers had massacred hundreds of men, women and children 27 years ago. But the visitor from Sherman Oaks had come too far--halfway into a 1,300-mile marathon run through Vietnam--to turn back. He ran on.
NEWS
November 12, 1989 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With five crisp tablets of Texas granite carved with 3,406 names behind him, and a crowd of veterans in front, an emotional President Bush dedicated the Texas Vietnam Veterans Memorial on Saturday, a monument to "the Lone Star heroes of America's longest war."
NEWS
December 18, 1995 | NORA ZAMICHOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. Maj. Gen. William L. Nash came of age as a soldier during the Cold War, when being sent into action meant killing the enemy. But now, Nash, who has served in two wars, will lead 20,000 U.S. soldiers--as well as 1,500 Russian troops--to prevent bloodshed and protect a newborn peace in Bosnia-Herzegovina. "It is the irony of all ironies," said Nash, puffing a cheap cigar in a rare interview at his home one recent morning with two cocker spaniels, Humphrey and Bogart, snoring by his feet.
NEWS
October 20, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Seven U.S. veterans inaugurated a health clinic in Yen Vien, Vietnam, an area northwest of Hanoi devastated by American bombs in 1972. The veterans worked with local Vietnamese to build the clinic, financed by a $34,000 donation from the California-based Veterans' Vietnam Restoration Project. The veterans, six men and a woman, said they helped build the clinic on the site of a hospital destroyed by bombs to heal psychological wounds lingering from the Vietnam War.
BUSINESS
June 25, 1995
In "On Affirmative Action, School Is by No Means Out" (June 18), James Flanigan states, "Still, it would have been better if, like returning World War II and Korean War veterans, Vietnam vets had been given a GI Bill of Rights, with money for education or to start a business or buy a home." In 1972 when I was attending college, there were many Vietnam vets on campus, myself included. Did I miss something in the article, or did Mr. Flanigan fail to do his research? WILLIAM T. DAVIS Pomona James Flanigan admits to being out of step on this issue.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 1995 | GEORGE RAMOS
Ruben Treviso has been an energetic fighter for veterans ever since he came back from Vietnam in 1971. He's been involved in numerous projects in Greater L.A. to honor vets in recent years, ranging from seeking more visible war monuments to honor America's dead to seeking money so that a vet can write of his war experiences and close that chapter of his life. Treviso, 49, does some of this work on his own time, believing it's the very least that can be done for veterans.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 28, 1995 | JEFF SCHNAUFER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Along a lonely road strewn with drying rice, Vietnam veteran Michael Liscio halted as he reached the fishing village of My Lai, the one stop he felt he had to make. He had been warned he would not be welcome in the place where U. S. soldiers had massacred hundreds of men, women and children 27 years ago. But the visitor from Sherman Oaks had come too far--halfway into a 1,300-mile marathon run through Vietnam--to turn back. He ran on.
NEWS
November 12, 1989 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With five crisp tablets of Texas granite carved with 3,406 names behind him, and a crowd of veterans in front, an emotional President Bush dedicated the Texas Vietnam Veterans Memorial on Saturday, a monument to "the Lone Star heroes of America's longest war."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 1988
Latino veterans of the Vietnam War got their first official memorial Wednesday when residents of the Boyle Heights community dedicated a new pedestrian mall in their honor. More than 300 people, including several Latino veterans of the conflict, stood by as the Paseo de las Flores Pedestrian Promenade was officially opened to the public.
NEWS
February 12, 1989
A group of former U.S. soldiers, hoping to "deliver an olive branch of peace," have begin to build a medical clinic in rural Vietnam, the Veterans-Vietnam Restoration Project announced. Although a number of veterans' groups have returned to Vietnam for visits, the clinic at Vung Tau in southern Vietnam is the first known development effort by former U.S. servicemen.
NEWS
July 14, 1985 | United Press International
A group claiming to be combat veterans of Vietnam and conflicts in Africa has claimed responsibility for the sinking of the Greenpeace environmental organization's flagship, investigators said Saturday. An unsigned handwritten leaflet delivered to the New Zealand Broadcasting Corp. said the Rainbow Warrior was sunk by the unnamed group Wednesday in Auckland harbor to prevent the Pacific region from becoming "another Lebanon."
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