Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsVeterinarians
IN THE NEWS

Veterinarians

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
April 26, 2012 | By Thomas H. Maugh II / For the Booster Shots blog
At least eight veterinary workers have been poisoned by exposure to potentially lethal phosphine gas when dogs being treated for ingesting pest-killing chemicals have thrown up in their offices, and health officials suspect there may be other unreported cases as well. All of the human victims recovered with no lasting effects, but the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention warned that more serious incidents could occur and cautioned veterinarians to be alert. Zinc phosphide is a widely used rodent killer.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 24, 2013 | By Tony Perry
SAN DIEGO - Jenny Chung is looking at the elephant that killed her sister, a well-known veterinarian in New Zealand who devoted years to the elephant's care after she was rescued from a touring circus. Chung has no anger toward Mila, the 7,600-pound African elephant with thoughtful eyes, stubby tusks, and hair on her back that turns reddish from "dirt baths. " "She never meant to hurt Helen, I'm convinced of that," Chung said. "She's lovely and she deserves to live like an elephant.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 1999 | CAITLIN LIU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The jury trial for the defamation lawsuit brought by veterinarian Melvyn Richkind against the city of Los Angeles has been postponed until June 21. Originally scheduled to begin Monday, the trial was delayed because Richkind and his attorney, Richard Wynne, were injured in separate car accidents. Wynne suffered a pinched nerve from an accident three weeks ago, and his painkillers have left him unable to conduct a trial this week, he said.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 2013 | By Inkoo Kang
Here's the life cycle of a declawed cat, according to "The Paw Project": As a kitten, its toes - the top third of the fingers on a human - are amputated. Shorn of its defenses, that cat has a 1-in-3 chance of developing a behavioral issue, like biting or urinating outside its litter box (because stepping on gravel becomes painful). Because of such problems, that cat is more likely to be given up to a shelter and, finally, euthanized. As an exotic-animal veterinarian, director Jennifer Conrad witnessed mountain lions walking on their wrists or forearms after declawing made normal movement agonizing.
NEWS
March 20, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Britain's chief vet brushed aside angry protests from farmers and pledged to push ahead with a mass cull of healthy animals in areas stricken by the foot-and-mouth livestock epidemic sweeping the country. The government's chief veterinary officer, Jim Scudamore, spent hours in talks with farmers from Cumbria in northwestern England--one of the worst-affected areas--but was not swayed by their pleas to spare the lives of animals not yet infected.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 30, 2001
Operating on jellyfish, taking blood samples from bat rays, coordinating CAT scans for a pair of sea turtles and overseeing laser surgery on a sea lion: These and more are part of a day on the job for Johanna Sherrill, veterinarian at the Aquarium of the Pacific in Long Beach. Sherrill, 34, manages health care for the aquarium's 12,000 residents. Her work involves making daily rounds and conducting regular physical exams.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 23, 1991 | JOCELYN Y. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
License revocation hearings began Monday for a Sun Valley veterinarian accused by the state attorney general's office of negligence in his diagnosis and treatment of several animals, officials said. Prompted by the complaints of pet owners and former employees, the state conducted an investigation of George Bernard Shaw, 60, and initiated proceedings last year to have Shaw's license suspended or revoked.
NEWS
January 5, 2000 | PETER M. WARREN and PHIL WILLON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Orange County's top veterinarian quit his job Tuesday in the midst of a county investigation of its troubled animal shelter and a disease outbreak that has infected and killed dozens of cats, including some taken home for adoption. Dr. Richard Evans, 53, resigned in the face of an inquiry that could have led to his firing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 9, 1997 | JIM HOLLANDER
Dr. Robert LaBounty has an ear for his calling. LaBounty, a Studio City veterinarian, has built a practice out of performing ear croppings on about 20 varieties of dogs such as schnauzers, pit bulls and Great Danes. Some of L.A.'s most notable canine owners, from the current Mrs. Hugh Hefner (Doberman pinscher) to Cuba Gooding Jr. (Great Danes) to Carrol O'Connor (miniature schnauzers) have hired him to sculpt and tend the ears of their pets.
NEWS
August 28, 1988 | DAN MORAIN, Times Staff Writer
Ray Deiter figures that if he can't save the whales, he'll do the next best thing--find out why they died. In between treating ailing horses, dogs and assorted other creatures, the burly 41-year-old veterinarian has become a self-taught coroner for the whales, seals and sea lions that periodically wash ashore along the coast north and south of San Francisco. It's an unofficial position.
NEWS
April 26, 2012 | By Thomas H. Maugh II / For the Booster Shots blog
At least eight veterinary workers have been poisoned by exposure to potentially lethal phosphine gas when dogs being treated for ingesting pest-killing chemicals have thrown up in their offices, and health officials suspect there may be other unreported cases as well. All of the human victims recovered with no lasting effects, but the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention warned that more serious incidents could occur and cautioned veterinarians to be alert. Zinc phosphide is a widely used rodent killer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 2012 | By Kelly Corrigan, Los Angeles Times
After more than 50 years as a veterinarian in Burbank, there's nothing small about Martin Small's contribution to Burbank's animal shelter. "I have never done anything more satisfying than what I've done since I've been here," he said. After spending the last several years working full time to establish the shelter's medical program, Small, 82, is now an on-call surgeon. Before he set foot in the shelter in 2004, cats suffered from contagious respiratory diseases and dogs were prone to kennel cough and parvovirus.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 2012 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
David W. Kenney, SeaWorld's first veterinarian, who played a key role in bringing the original Shamu to the San Diego amusement park as well as a gray whale believed to be the first raised by humans, died Feb. 14 in Montrose, Colo. He was 77. The cause was cancer, said his sister, Meredith Maler. Kenney was hired by the park a few weeks before its 1964 opening and over the next several years displayed an ingenuity and dedication that helped the fledgling tourist attraction build and maintain an impressive collection of marine animals.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 2012 | By Nicole Santa Cruz and Ruben Vives, Los Angeles Times
An outbreak of a deadly virus has horse trainers and owners in Riverside and Orange counties fearful for the health of their animals. On Tuesday, a horse at the Empire Polo Club in Indio was euthanized because of complications from equine herpes virus-1. At Rancho Sierra Vista in San Juan Capistrano, 16 cases of the disease have been identified since Jan. 11 and one horse had to be euthanized. Both sites have been placed under quarantine by state veterinarians. No horses are allowed to leave or enter, and caretakers must take sanitary precautions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 8, 2011 | By Ann M. Simmons, Los Angeles Times
Alan Mootnick, a self-taught primate specialist who rose to become a leading authority on gibbon biology and conservation, died Friday at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles of complications following heart surgery, relatives said. He was 60. A self-described modern-day Tarzan, Mootnick founded the nonprofit Gibbon Conservation Center in Santa Clarita in 1976. In interviews, he stated that his aim was to advance the study, propagation and protection of the endangered species.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 2011 | By Bill Christine, Special to the Los Angeles Times
When Mark Gerard was studying to be a veterinarian at Cornell University, he helped make ends meet during the summers by working as an exercise rider at Belmont Park on Long Island in New York. One of the horsemen he worked for was the Hall of Fame trainer Sunny Jim Fitzsimmons. Across the street from Belmont was Esposito's, a rickety bar that was like a second home for many racetrackers. Esposito's also served a cheap breakfast, for a buck and a half, and Gerard could be found there many mornings, wolfing it down.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 24, 2000 | ROSEMARY CLANDOS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
His patient was late for her appearance in the Hollywood Christmas parade. All medical tests had failed to find the cause of the TV star's unexplained fever, so she would have to undergo exploratory surgery. Within an hour, veterinarian James Peddi would save another famous life. This time it was Happy, the mutt on the WB series "7th Heaven," who had a twisted and dying spleen. Peddi, an instructor at Moorpark College's Exotic Animal Training and Management Program, is a top vet to animal stars.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 2000 | PETER M. WARREN and PHIL WILLON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Orange County's top veterinarian quit his job Tuesday, one day after being placed on administrative leave while the county investigates mounting problems at the animal shelter in Orange. Dr. Richard H. Evans, who was chief of veterinary services in the Health Care Agency since 1992, submitted a letter of resignation to the agency, county officials said. He could not be reached Tuesday for comment.
NEWS
March 14, 2011 | By Mary Forgione, Tribune Health
There are many reasons to get a dog (because your kid keeps bugging you for one?) but becoming more healthy doesn't usually top the list. Maybe it should. A new study finds that dog owners not only get more exercise by walking their dogs but they tend to be more active overall.  The study examined 5,902 responses from the 2005 Michigan Behavioral Risk Factor Survey. Of the 41 percent who were dog owners, 61 percent of respondents said they walked their dogs at least 10 minutes at a time and 27 percent said they walked their dogs at least 150 minutes a week.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 2010 | By Daina Beth Solomon, Special to the Los Angeles Times
When Dr. Luther Halsey Gulick Jr. and his wife, Charlotte, founded Camp Fire Girls in 1910, their goal was simple: to better their Vermont town on the occasion of its 150th anniversary. For the celebratory pageant, the Boy Scouts had been designated to play a key role, with girls left watching from the sidelines. In response, Gulick set out to create an organization focused on outdoor activities especially for young women. Camp Fire Girls of America was incorporated as a national agency in 1912.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|