Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsVeterinary Medicine
IN THE NEWS

Veterinary Medicine

BUSINESS
August 16, 1999 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
By the time she was 1, Mattie Adlington was destructive. She ripped a 10-by-3-foot piece of siding off her house and tore out a large section of fence. Loud thunder or a truck's backfire would send her into an agitated tizzy of pacing and whining. She also gnawed everything in sight. Luckily for the San Diego owner of the black Labrador retriever, a veterinarian worked nearby with expertise in applied animal behavior.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 1999 | ART MARROQUIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was just after 2 a.m. when the emergency hotline rang. Rebecca Dmytryk woke from a deep sleep and clambered for the phone. "Hello," she mumbled. "There's a coyote that was hit by a car," a caller said. "It's lying in the road and he's barely moving." Dmytryk perked up, threw on a pair of jeans and grabbed some bags filled with medical equipment. She hopped into her car and drove from her Calabasas home about eight miles to Malibu, praying that the coyote was still alive.
NEWS
May 3, 1999 | ROSIE MESTEL, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
Imagine if the late British author James Herriot were writing his stories about veterinary practice today. You'd still have the animals, of course: faithful old Fluffy, the arthritic golden retriever, creaking painfully to his feet; or Lolita, the lovable Lhasa apso, apt to shred curtains to tatters and deposit malodorous gifts on the rug when her mistress leaves the house. And you'd still have vets and owners who care deeply about their furred and whiskered charges.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 1999 | MICHAEL LUO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The killer struck with breathtaking speed. Within hours, it was over--death by massive hemorrhaging in the heart. An exhausted Joel Parrott, the Oakland Zoo's director, performed the elephant necropsy himself at 5 a.m., a scant two hours after 11-month-old Kijana, the first African elephant born in captivity in North America to survive past a few months, suddenly collapsed and died in October 1996.
NEWS
February 11, 1999 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.N. Food and Agricultural Organization warned Wednesday that an outbreak of animal diseases in Iraq could easily spread to nearby countries and contaminate food supplies. It said the collapse of Iraq's veterinary services after the 1991 Persian Gulf War had led to cases of foot-and-mouth disease, brucellosis and other serious ailments.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 1999 | DAVID HALDANE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Life is touch-and-go at T.H.E. Cat Hospital of Irvine these days. Tom Elston, the reigning veterinarian, is back doing what he loves best--operating on small, furry animals, dispensing advice to their owners and occasionally scraping the plaque off sharp little feline teeth. But the hospital lobby, once teeming with mewing patients, is quieter now. And Elston's once-sterling reputation as one of the premier cat doctors in the country has been tarnished.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 1999 | DAVID HALDANE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Life is touch-and-go at T.H.E. Cat Hospital of Irvine these days. Tom Elston, the reigning veterinarian, is back doing what he loves best--operating on small, furry animals, dispensing advice to their owners and occasionally scraping the plaque off sharp little feline teeth. But the hospital lobby, once teeming with mewing patients, is a lot quieter now. Elston, 50, is more circumspect in his dealings with those who do come.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 1999
An ex-veterinarian, who was ordered to do 1,000 hours of community service in 1996 for animal neglect and practicing veterinary medicine without a license, surrendered Friday to begin serving a one-year jail term for continuing his illegal practice, Los Angeles City Atty. James Hahn said. George Bernard Shaw, 68, was sentenced Nov.
NEWS
January 6, 1999 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Food and Drug Administration said Tuesday that it has approved the first "antidepressant" drug designed exclusively for Fido. The canine "uppers" help treat separation anxiety, which apparently can be a serious problem for some neurotic dogs whose humans tend to live at the office--or who just spend too many hours away from home. This is sure to be welcome news for the millions of Americans who dote on their pooches in myriad ways.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 1999 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
No, they haven't run out of people with cancer to treat. And no, they aren't starting a UC Davis-style veterinary training program. So why was UCLA Medical Center letting that golden retriever sniff around its room-sized cobalt radiation machine on Tuesday? Turns out that UCLA radiation oncology experts were opening a $1.5-million cancer treatment center. For dogs and cats. University technicians will run the clinic for a private Westside veterinary hospital.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|