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Veterinary Medicine

NEWS
July 20, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
A group of World War II dogs--including 25 killed in action--have been recognized for their heroic service on Guam. A statue of Kurt, a Doberman pinscher who saved the lives of 250 Marines when he alerted them to Japanese soldiers, was dedicated at the University of Tennessee's College of Veterinary Medicine in Knoxville.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 19, 1998 | ANNE-MARIE O'CONNOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cats squirmed and growled in pain as they were neutered because they were not properly anesthetized. The abdominal organs of the Lopez family dog were reportedly pulled out during one unorthodox spaying, and the pet died. The Chavez's German shepherd, Spike, appeared to have been strangled by an inept attendant before surgery even began.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 20, 1998 | PHIL DAVIS
When the family pet is feeling down, animal lovers too often turn to their medicine cabinet in search of relief for their canine or feline pal. That violates pet first aid Rule No. 1: What makes you feel better can kill your pet. "People just assume they can use over-the-counter medicines on their pets, like giving a cat Tylenol. You'll kill it more often than not," warned Laguna Niguel veterinarian Clayton Simon. Pet first aid can be tricky.
NEWS
January 31, 1998 | From Associated Press
The government approved the first artificial blood Friday. But it's just for dogs. BioPure Corp.'s Oxyglobin is big news for veterinarians because animal blood banks are rare and veterinarians struggle to find canine blood donors whenever a dog gets hit by a car or comes down with anemia.
NEWS
November 3, 1997 | BRENDA LOREE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Beth Borozan first realized something was wrong when Buster, her golden retriever, took a break from their game of catch to spit up $1.49. "Thirteen dimes and 19 pennies to be exact," Borozan said. Borozan didn't panic, exactly, but she was distressed. Then she recalled another puzzling moment earlier in the day, "a suspicious clank in the pooper scooper."
NEWS
November 2, 1997 | BRENDA LOREE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Beth Borozan first realized something was wrong when Buster, her golden retriever, took a break from their game of catch to spit up $1.49. "Thirteen dimes and 19 pennies to be exact," Borozan said. Borozan didn't panic, exactly, but she was distressed. Then she recalled another puzzling moment earlier in the day, "a suspicious clank in the pooper scooper."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 1997 | SYLVIA L. OLIANDE
Pierce College's veterinary science program had long wanted to update its educational software, but the agriculture department couldn't afford it. Not giving up, program officials recently appealed to Oregon-based Interactive Technology Group Inc., explaining the financial situation facing the college and the department.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 15, 1997 | RUSS LOAR, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Dr. Bruce Levine's mother always wanted him to be a doctor, but the type of patients he has treated during the last 20 years is not exactly what she had in mind. An average working day for the 45-year-old Placentia veterinarian can bring anything from snakes and iguanas to parrots and ferrets to his examination table, along with the occasional dog or cat. "My mom wanted me to be an M.D., but I just couldn't see it.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 9, 1997 | JIM HOLLANDER
Dr. Robert LaBounty has an ear for his calling. LaBounty, a Studio City veterinarian, has built a practice out of performing ear croppings on about 20 varieties of dogs such as schnauzers, pit bulls and Great Danes. Some of L.A.'s most notable canine owners, from the current Mrs. Hugh Hefner (Doberman pinscher) to Cuba Gooding Jr. (Great Danes) to Carrol O'Connor (miniature schnauzers) have hired him to sculpt and tend the ears of their pets.
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