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Veterinary Medicine

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September 7, 1996 | Reuters
When residents of this town want the best medical care money can buy, they will soon be able to go to the local veterinary hospital. It has some of the region's most advanced medical equipment, including a magnetic resonance imager. On Monday, an 80-year-old woman will be the first human to be diagnosed on the MRI at Washington State University Veterinary Teaching Hospital.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 3, 1996 | TINA DAUNT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Admittedly, the cantaloupe was just a distraction. Terai--a 2 1/2-ton Indian rhino--slurped, slobbered and snorted as she crunched the melon in her giant jaws. Cynthia Stringfield figured she had about 10 seconds to insert a needle into a vein in the rhino's ear and draw blood before the beast finished her snack and realized that she was a pachyderm-sized pincushion. "Hi, girl," Stringfield cooed as she poked at Terai's skin. "Be good. . . ."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 1996 | JOSE CARDENAS
A Lake View Terrace man was sentenced Wednesday to 1,000 hours of community service after pleading no contest to animal neglect and practicing veterinary medicine without a license, authorities said. George Bernard Shaw, 66, was sentenced by Van Nuys Municipal Court Commissioner Mitchell Block after Shaw entered his plea to two counts of animal neglect and one count of unlicensed veterinary practice, said Mike Qualls, a spokesman for the Los Angeles city attorney's office.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 1996 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The good news is that after more than a year with only one veterinarian to care for the 74,000 animals that come through Los Angeles shelters each year, the Animal Regulation Department hired a second vet last week. The bad news is that he quit the next day. "He was really not here long enough for me to get used to," said Dena Mangiamele, the department's lone vet. "What are you going to do?" Mangiamele said that Grover H.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 1996 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There is good news and bad news for the beleaguered Los Angeles Animal Regulation Department. The good news is that after more than a year with only one veterinarian to care for the 74,000 animals that come through the city shelters each year, the department hired a second vet last week. The bad news is that he quit the next day. "He was really not here long enough for me to get used to," said Dena Mangiamele, the department's lone vet. "What are you going to do?" Mangiamele said that Grover H.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 1996 | GREG HERNANDEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The buckskin quarter horse stands shakily on a painful left front hoof, his big brown eyes fixed trustingly on Dr. Paul Wan. "You're soooooo good," Wan says soothingly to 8-year-old Ernie, who is becoming agitated as the 32-year-old veterinarian injects a tranquilizer into the animal's neck. Ernie, growing wobbly, is led into a circular operating room where Wan will perform laser surgery on the injured hoof.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 1996 | FRANK B. WILLIAMS
Animal regulation officials on Monday charged a Lake View Terrace man with practicing veterinary medicine without a license. George Bernard Shaw, 65, is scheduled to be arraigned March 26 in Van Nuys Municipal Court on seven counts of unlicensed veterinary practice, two counts of animal neglect and one count of unlawful possession of controlled substances. He may face up to six months in jail for each charge and/or a fine of $1,000.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 27, 1995
Q: Is a dog's mouth really more sanitary than a human's? Many people believe that if you are hurt in the woods, you should have a dog lick your wound because the dog's saliva contains an antiseptic. A: A dog's mouth is no cleaner than yours, according to veterinarian Don Low of the UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine. In fact, dogs lick so many different things that their mouths are probably much less sanitary, he said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 1995 | LEE ROMNEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A cacophony of clanging metal shattered the calm at Santa Catalina Island's working ranch before the buffalo cow, with a low grunt, gave in to the grip of the aging squeeze chute. Her chocolate mane was matted with burrs, her eyes afflicted with a touch of infection that a ranch hand tended with a casual toss of "pink eye" powder. In a nearby corral, a dozen waiting bulls ran nervously in tight circles, raising a slow-moving dust cloud into the stillness from the hay-strewn ground.
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