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BUSINESS
April 15, 2013 | By Salvador Rodriguez
If you long for the days of speckled images and crackling sounds, head to YouTube because it's now letting users relive the era of cassette tapes with a "VHS mode. " The new mode, which will only be around for one day, gives YouTube videos a shaky feel and grainy look -- reminiscent of what the images on a VHS tape would look like after being played too often. At times, the bottom right of the image curves inward, distorting the picture, and if you hit pause, the whole video starts to shake.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
February 23, 2014 | By Paresh Dave
She had already spent a night in jail, all for allegedly failing to return a VHS she rented eight years ago of the movie "Monster-in-Law. " She faced a $1,000 fine and up to a full month behind bars. But the saga now has a feel-good Hollywood ending -- the former video store is declining to pursue the accusation. The plight of Kayla Michell Finley had made headlines nationwide, prompting comments about law enforcement priorities and injustice -- or at least snarky remarks about VHS tapes.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 6, 2012 | By Jessica Gelt, Los Angeles Times
After being closed for nearly a decade, the well-loved gay video bar, Revolver, which originally debuted in the early '80s, has reopened under new management in West Hollywood. Times have changed, though, and the revolving entrance door and the expansive front windows are no longer blacked out. And with new transparency comes a new sensibility for the bar. What was once dark and divey is now clean, bright and fresh, as is the roster of talented performers that Revolver's new owner, Alfredo Diaz, has been quietly amassing since the bar opened.
NATIONAL
February 20, 2014 | By Paresh Dave
Kayla Michelle Finley is probably regretting her decision to rent a VHS tape of “Monster-in-Law” in 2005 -- not because DVDs or Blu-Ray would offer a better picture, but because that VHS rental cost her a night in jail. If that wasn't bad enough, the crime she was arrested for no longer exists in South Carolina. “Larceny -- failure to return a rented video” was taken off the books in 2010. Finley's bad luck began earlier this month when she went to the Pickens County Sheriff's Office to report a “domestic situation,” a sheriff's spokesman told the Los Angeles Times.
BUSINESS
January 10, 2012 | By Alex Pham, Los Angeles Times
About four times a week, before heading to bed, George Gaffoglio retreats to the upstairs bedroom of his Irvine home, where he settles on his couch, picks up his guitar and fires up his laptop. For the next half-hour or so, the 54-year-old sets aside his daily worries and dives into a website called ArtistWorks, where he plays along with instructional videos by Martin Taylor, attempting to mimic a British jazz guitarist who has collaborated with George Harrison, Dionne Warwick and other musicians.
NATIONAL
February 20, 2014 | By Paresh Dave
Kayla Michelle Finley is probably regretting her decision to rent a VHS tape of “Monster-in-Law” in 2005 -- not because DVDs or Blu-Ray would offer a better picture, but because that VHS rental cost her a night in jail. If that wasn't bad enough, the crime she was arrested for no longer exists in South Carolina. “Larceny -- failure to return a rented video” was taken off the books in 2010. Finley's bad luck began earlier this month when she went to the Pickens County Sheriff's Office to report a “domestic situation,” a sheriff's spokesman told the Los Angeles Times.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 1987 | DENNIS HUNT and TERRY ATKINSON
If the most recent Consumer Electronics Show here is any indication, evolution, not revolution, has become the watchword in entertainment technology. The four-day winter show, which ended Sunday, offered enough new merchandise to fill the Las Vegas Convention Center and spill over to nearby hotels. There was enough hands-on gadgetry to keep most retailers and distributors satisfied.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 1988 | DENNIS HUNT, Times Staff Writer
Super VHS (S-VHS), offering a much sharper picture than regular VHS, is supposedly the format of the future. Well, the future is now a step closer--but just a tiny step. S-VHS videocassette decks have been on the market since last year, but only 100,000 have been sold. One problem is the price--a hefty $1,000 to $1,500. Another has been the total lack of prerecorded cassettes in the S-VHS format. Video companies haven't been rushing to board the S-VHS bandwagon.
BUSINESS
June 21, 2002 | Bloomberg News
Circuit City Group is eliminating VHS movies from its stores to make room for faster- selling DVDs, the first national retailer to do so. The company has removed videocassette movies at some of its 622 stores and plans to stop VHS sales at other stores. Shares of Richmond, Va.-based Circuit City fell 78 cents to $19.77 on the New York Stock Exchange.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 2008 | Deborah Netburn
We're not afraid to talk about: The potential comic genius of Larry the Cable Guy. This week, Larry the Cable Guy follows his movie about paintball players who wind up in Mexico and think they are in Iraq ("Delta Farce") with a film called "Witless Protection." This one is about a man who interrupts a "kidnapping" that is actually FBI agents escorting a witness to a trial. We have never seen Larry the Cable Guy in action, but we may end that streak this week.
BUSINESS
April 15, 2013 | By Salvador Rodriguez
If you long for the days of speckled images and crackling sounds, head to YouTube because it's now letting users relive the era of cassette tapes with a "VHS mode. " The new mode, which will only be around for one day, gives YouTube videos a shaky feel and grainy look -- reminiscent of what the images on a VHS tape would look like after being played too often. At times, the bottom right of the image curves inward, distorting the picture, and if you hit pause, the whole video starts to shake.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 2012 | By Robert Abele
The found-footage horror genre hits eye-strain levels with "V/H/S," an indie anthology of six what's-on-this-tape films from nine directors, featuring mainly two kinds of images: someone talking to a camera lens, and something horrific barely visible through a shaky camera lens. There are some unholy pleasures: David Bruckner's tale of loutish amateur-porn wannabes (the camera's hidden in the nerd's glasses) who pick up the wrong girl is a grimly propulsive lick of mythic vengeance; the talented Ti West's second-honeymoon story, blissfully free of agitated camerawork, gets at the creepy vibe of road motel rooms; and Joe Swanberg's non-Mumblecore riff on video chats and haunted apartments has the crisp dread of a chilling short story.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 2012 | By Noel Murray
The Pirates! Band of Misfits Sony, $30.99; Blu-ray, $40.99/$45.99 Available on VOD beginning Tuesday Aardman Animations' stop-motion adaptation of Gideon Defoe's cult novel is fast-paced and full of dry British wit and sly visual gags - almost like a kid-friendly cartoon version of a Monty Python film. Hugh Grant voices a kindly but inept pirate captain, who seizes Charles Darwin's expedition ship and then finds himself dodging the Queen's army while trying to leverage a rare dodo into a trophy for Pirate of the Year.
OPINION
January 19, 2012 | By Stephanie Coontz
As of 2010, according to a recent report from the Pew Research Center, married couples had fallen to barely 51% of U.S. households, with a full 5% drop in new marriages between 2009 and 2010 alone. The data for 2011 aren't in yet, but if that decline continued last year, less than half of American adults are in a legal marriage now. Is marriage going the way of the electric typewriter and the VHS tape? Not exactly. The decline of marriage seems especially dramatic in comparison to the way things were 50 years ago. In 1960, almost half of 18- to 24-year-olds and 82% of 25- to 34-year-olds were married.
BUSINESS
January 10, 2012 | By Alex Pham, Los Angeles Times
About four times a week, before heading to bed, George Gaffoglio retreats to the upstairs bedroom of his Irvine home, where he settles on his couch, picks up his guitar and fires up his laptop. For the next half-hour or so, the 54-year-old sets aside his daily worries and dives into a website called ArtistWorks, where he plays along with instructional videos by Martin Taylor, attempting to mimic a British jazz guitarist who has collaborated with George Harrison, Dionne Warwick and other musicians.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 6, 2012 | By Jessica Gelt, Los Angeles Times
After being closed for nearly a decade, the well-loved gay video bar, Revolver, which originally debuted in the early '80s, has reopened under new management in West Hollywood. Times have changed, though, and the revolving entrance door and the expansive front windows are no longer blacked out. And with new transparency comes a new sensibility for the bar. What was once dark and divey is now clean, bright and fresh, as is the roster of talented performers that Revolver's new owner, Alfredo Diaz, has been quietly amassing since the bar opened.
NEWS
April 19, 2001 | LAWRENCE J. MAGID, larry.magid@latimes.com
If you're in the market for a camcorder and plan to use your PC to edit the tapes, consider a digital video recorder. DV recorders connect directly to a PC or a Mac via a 1394 port--also known as FireWire or iLink--which makes it easy to transfer video between recorder and computer. But you might already have an old-fashioned analog camcorder with lots of old tapes. Even if you're willing to spend $500 or more on a new DV recorder, it won't do you any good if you want to edit analog tapes.
NEWS
January 20, 1992
Shizuo Takano, 68, an electronics engineer and executive who championed development of VHS videocassette recorders. In 1970, Takano, a former Victor Co. of Japan vice president, predicted there would be strong demand for home videotape recorders. As chief of JVC's video products division, he began development of a system that was to be smaller and easier to operate than the bulky professional machines then in use.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 22, 2008 | Geoff Boucher
Pop culture is finally hitting the eject button on the VHS tape, the once ubiquitous home video format that will finish this month as a creaky ghost of Christmas past. After three decades of steady if unspectacular service, the spinning wheels of the home entertainment stalwart are slowing to a halt at retail outlets. On a crisp Friday morning in October, the final truckload of VHS tapes rolled out of a Palm Harbor, Fla., warehouse run by Ryan J. Kugler, the last major supplier of the tapes.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 2008 | Dennis Lim, Special to The Times
It's A pity that Michel Gondry's “Be Kind Rewind,” a movie rife with DIY optimism and analog nostalgia, arrives this week on DVD and not, as befits its premise, good old-fashioned VHS. Gondry has a reputation for technical wizardry -- he is credited with inventing the freeze-and-pan "bullet time" special effect that the Wachowski brothers borrowed for their "Matrix" movies -- but his work is often most magical when he draws on low-tech, even primitive methods.
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