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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 4, 1998
Your April 27 editorial on insurance coverage for Viagra failed to assess the drug's medical significance. For prostate cancer survivors, erectile dysfunction is a consequence of a life-threatening illness that called for extensive medical remedies. Like any healing medication, Viagra is simply a continuation of that treatment. It can restore a normal, healthy condition. I agree that frivolous demands should not be covered. But insurers cannot claim that helping a cancer patient regain a normal sex life is not a legitimate health concern.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SCIENCE
December 9, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
Viagra may no longer be just for the gentlemen. A new study suggests that those little blue pills may also help women, though not in the way you might think. Researchers have found that sildenafil citrate, the main ingredient in Viagra, Revatio and other drugs used to treat erectile dysfunction, can also be used to alleviate moderate to severe menstrual cramping in women. "It seems counterintuitive, but what sildenafil citrate does is dilate blood vessels," said Richard Legro, a gynecologist at Penn State College of Medicine and one of the authors of the study.
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NEWS
May 6, 2013 | By Paul Whitefield
What makes Viagra so interesting? On Monday, my colleague Chad Terhune wrote about Pfizer's plan to begin selling its little blue pills directly to patients on the company's website. And within a couple of hours, the story was listed among  the “Most Viewed” on The Times' website. Do you think there would have been the same interest for a story about Pfizer selling its Lipitor cholesterol drug online?  Me neither. Even in pharmaceuticals, it seems, sex sells. Literally.
BUSINESS
May 6, 2013 | By Chad Terhune
Pfizer Inc. will begin selling its popular erectile dysfunction pill Viagra to patients on its website, in an unusual move to combat counterfeit drugs. It's a novel strategy because drug-makers rarely sell medicines directly to patients, but analysts say rivals will be watching the experiment closely. Men will still need a prescription to get the little blue pills delivered to their home, but they won't have to deal with a pharmacist in the store. Online pharmacies have proliferated in recent years, hawking fake versions of Viagra and other brand-name drugs at ultra-low prices and with no prescription needed.
NEWS
March 15, 2011 | By Tami Dennis, Tribune Health
Cialis, Viagra, Levitra and other erectile dysfunction drugs are not considered   necessary by the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services. Apparently many men disagree. Hence the $3.1 million charged to Medicare Part D for the drugs in 2007 and 2008. A new report from the department's Office of Inspector General chides the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, which runs the labyrinthian Medicare program, for the error. Sure, the drug can be covered when prescribed for non-sexual reasons.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 9, 1998
Re "State Investigates Kaiser's Refusal to Provide Viagra," July 3: How arrogant of state Sen. John Vasconcellos (D-Santa Clara) to think he could take away every Californian's right to the best HMO the state has to offer. I am appalled by the thought that Kaiser's excellent service should not be available to me any longer, simply because it chooses to avoid rising costs due to the craze on Viagra, by not covering the costs of the pill. Kaiser is the best health care there is--I have tried other HMOs and was shocked by the bad service and hassles I encountered and would not appreciate being forced to go back to any one of them.
HEALTH
January 17, 2011 | By Joe Graedon and Theresa Graedon, Special to the Los Angeles Times
I have heard that Viagra is effective for altitude sickness. Is this true? Viagra is best known as a treatment for erectile dysfunction. But there are reports that it has off-label uses in treating a number of other conditions, including pulmonary hypertension (elevated blood pressure in the artery to the lungs). People who climb mountains may develop high-altitude pulmonary edema, which can be quite dangerous. In this condition, fluid accumulates in the lungs and makes breathing difficult.
NEWS
November 19, 2012 | By Jon Bardin
So much for that oft-hyped magical bullet of masculinity: For men with erectile dysfunction, adding testosterone to Viagra does nothing to improve the likelihood of successful erections, sexual performance or physical intimacy, according to a new study. Men with ED often have low testosterone levels as well. What's more, testosterone is a well-known regulator of sexual motivation, and animal studies have consistently shown that testosterone plays a role in blood flow to the penis and other biological processes thought to be related to successful erections.
OPINION
June 1, 2005
Re "Gov. Says No to Viagra for Sex Offenders," May 27: Like most people, I was shocked to learn that registered sex offenders are receiving Viagra and other erectile dysfunction drugs under Medicaid. But then, why is anyone receiving these drugs on the taxpayers' dime? The money could be better spent for critical lifesaving treatments for the needy. Cleo Sopp Whittier
NEWS
July 6, 2010 | By Tami Dennis, Los Angeles Times
The benefits of erectile dysfunction drugs are well- documented. They may be double-edged as well. In a study published Tuesday in Annals of Internal Medicine, researchers analyzed pharmacy data for men over 40 who had received a prescription for an erectile dysfunction drug. We'll let them sum it up: "Men who use ED drugs have higher rates of STDs, particularly HIV infection, both in the year before and after use of these drugs." Here's the abstract from the STD study, the journal's information for patients and the pertinent-facts WebMD story: Men on ED Drugs Get More STDs.
NEWS
May 6, 2013 | By Paul Whitefield
What makes Viagra so interesting? On Monday, my colleague Chad Terhune wrote about Pfizer's plan to begin selling its little blue pills directly to patients on the company's website. And within a couple of hours, the story was listed among  the “Most Viewed” on The Times' website. Do you think there would have been the same interest for a story about Pfizer selling its Lipitor cholesterol drug online?  Me neither. Even in pharmaceuticals, it seems, sex sells. Literally.
SPORTS
November 29, 2012 | By Houston Mitchell
Chicago Bears wide receiver has an interesting insight into what some NFL players will use to make themselves play better: Viagra. Brad Biggs of the Chicago Tribune reports that Marshall was asked about players using Adderall, which is being blamed for a rising number of suspensions for the use of performance-enhancing drugs in the NFL and other sports. "I don't know too much about Adderall," Marshall said. "I know guys, it is such a competitive league, guys try anything just to get that edge.
NEWS
November 19, 2012 | By Jon Bardin
So much for that oft-hyped magical bullet of masculinity: For men with erectile dysfunction, adding testosterone to Viagra does nothing to improve the likelihood of successful erections, sexual performance or physical intimacy, according to a new study. Men with ED often have low testosterone levels as well. What's more, testosterone is a well-known regulator of sexual motivation, and animal studies have consistently shown that testosterone plays a role in blood flow to the penis and other biological processes thought to be related to successful erections.
NEWS
March 15, 2011 | By Tami Dennis, Tribune Health
Cialis, Viagra, Levitra and other erectile dysfunction drugs are not considered   necessary by the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services. Apparently many men disagree. Hence the $3.1 million charged to Medicare Part D for the drugs in 2007 and 2008. A new report from the department's Office of Inspector General chides the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, which runs the labyrinthian Medicare program, for the error. Sure, the drug can be covered when prescribed for non-sexual reasons.
HEALTH
January 17, 2011 | By Joe Graedon and Theresa Graedon, Special to the Los Angeles Times
I have heard that Viagra is effective for altitude sickness. Is this true? Viagra is best known as a treatment for erectile dysfunction. But there are reports that it has off-label uses in treating a number of other conditions, including pulmonary hypertension (elevated blood pressure in the artery to the lungs). People who climb mountains may develop high-altitude pulmonary edema, which can be quite dangerous. In this condition, fluid accumulates in the lungs and makes breathing difficult.
HEALTH
August 13, 2010
So many male-performance supplements contain actual drugs, or their cousins, used to treat erectile dysfunction, it would appear many men could skip the doctor and head straight for the supplement shelves. In recent days, the Food and Drug Administration has announced these recalls: -On Aug. 10: Novacare LLC Conducts Voluntary Nationwide Recall of Products Found to Contain Undeclared Drug Ingredient  ... The product appears to contain sulfoaildenafil, an analogue of sildenafil  (more commonly known as Viagra or Revatio)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 9, 2001
Who Cares? Why on Earth are you writing about the use of Viagra in the porn industry ("Lights! Camera! Viagra!" July 6)? And on the front page of the paper? How about on the front page of the entertainment section or, better yet, the front page of nothing? Who cares, and what's your point? This new direction for the paper is a bit too far out there. Stacey Strickler Los Angeles My children and I wish to express our appreciation for your Page 1 article on porn star performances.
OPINION
May 3, 1998 | BRUCE MCCALL, Bruce McCall is a regular contributor to the New Yorker. He is author of a memoir "Thin Ice: Coming of Age in Canada."
'A gun pointed directly at every man who works an 18-hour day." "A bald violation of every man's God-given right to say 'Not tonight, dear.' " As these angry quotes attest, Viagra may not be an unmixed blessing for mankind, No sooner had the long-sought scientific cure for male impotence been placed on sale in America than a vocal and active opposition has arisen to protest the little blue pill's potentially revolutionary social effects.
NEWS
July 6, 2010 | By Tami Dennis, Los Angeles Times
The benefits of erectile dysfunction drugs are well- documented. They may be double-edged as well. In a study published Tuesday in Annals of Internal Medicine, researchers analyzed pharmacy data for men over 40 who had received a prescription for an erectile dysfunction drug. We'll let them sum it up: "Men who use ED drugs have higher rates of STDs, particularly HIV infection, both in the year before and after use of these drugs." Here's the abstract from the STD study, the journal's information for patients and the pertinent-facts WebMD story: Men on ED Drugs Get More STDs.
HEALTH
June 28, 2010 | By Jessica Pauline Ogilvie, Special to the Los Angeles Times
A "little pink pill" to solve women's sexual problems probably won't be hitting drugstore shelves anytime soon. But that doesn't mean discussion of the need for it, or lack thereof, is likely to end. On June 18, an advisory panel for the Food and Drug Administration recommended against the approval of flibanserin, which had been touted as a female Viagra. The FDA can accept or reject the panel's advice but usually chooses to follow it. In many drug approval proceedings, that would be the end of the matter.
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