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Viasource Communications Inc

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BUSINESS
August 29, 2000 | Daryl Strickland
Viasource Communications Inc. said Monday it has cut about 150 employees nationwide, including 20 at its unit in Newport Beach. The local job cuts came at the former TeleCore Inc., which Viasource acquired in June. The unit, which provides digital subscriber lines that allow high-speed Internet service through traditional phone lines, had 500 employees, including 125 in Newport Beach. Viasource bought TeleCore for $172.
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BUSINESS
October 9, 2001 | From Bloomberg News
Trading in Extreme Networks Inc. and Viasource Communications Inc. was halted for about two hours Monday after a fake news release saying Extreme offered to buy Viasource was published on the Internet. The message was posted to Yahoo Inc.'s Viasource bulletin board by an anonymous user. The phony release was made up to look as if it came from PR Newswire and was dated Oct. 9. Yahoo deleted the message after being contacted by PR Newswire, which distributes news releases.
BUSINESS
July 6, 2000 | MARC BALLON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Add John Clarey, 34, to the list of newly minted Internet millionaires. Four years ago, he launched TeleCore Inc. from a tiny office near John Wayne Airport, positioning it as a technical staffing firm and installer of fiber optics equipment. In the fall of 1998, he took his company into the market for digital subscriber lines, or DSLs, which provide high-speed Internet service through traditional phone lines. Little did he know then how hot DSL would be.
BUSINESS
July 6, 2000 | MARC BALLON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Add John M. Clarey, 34, to the list of newly minted Internet millionaires. Four years ago, the Newport Beach man launched TeleCore Inc. from a tiny office near John Wayne Airport, positioning it as a technical staffing firm and installer of fiber-optic equipment. In the fall of 1998, he took his company into the business of providing digital subscriber lines, which provide high-speed Internet service through traditional phone lines. Little did he know then how hot DSL services would be.
NEWS
July 10, 2000 | ROBIN FIELDS and P.J. HUFFSTUTTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The khaki crowd, bleary-eyed at 7:45 a.m., crams around the Diedrich coffee hut. Programmers from Cisco Systems Inc., waiting impatiently for their double cappuccinos, chat about the latest project hurdle. A manager from America Online Inc. eavesdrops. Behind them, a salesman from start-up Biz2biz-.com gabs on a cell phone cradled in the crook of his neck as he jots on a Palm organizer balanced on top of a large latte. A typical scene in Silicon Valley.
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