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Viatcheslav Ekimov

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SPORTS
May 8, 1989
Henk Lubberding of the Netherlands won the 123-mile New York to Lehigh Valley stage, but Dag-Otto Lauritzen of Norway took over as the overall leader of the Tour de Trump at Allentown, Pa. Lauritzen, the third overall leader in three days, placed second in the stage to overtake Viatcheslav Ekimov of the Soviet Union. Lubberding, 35, the oldest rider in the field, was timed in 5 hours 40 minutes 17 seconds in the longest race in the 10-day event. Paul Curran of England finished third, four seconds back of Lubberding.
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SPORTS
July 6, 2004 | From Associated Press
While Lance Armstrong played it safe, Robbie McEwen sprinted to victory Monday in a crash-filled second stage of the Tour de France. Armstrong kept his drive for a record sixth consecutive Tour victory on track by placing comfortably down in the field -- along with several key rivals -- in 85th place. Armstrong's biggest threat, 1997 Tour winner Jan Ullrich, finished 38th, in the same time as the Texan. Armstrong is in fourth place overall, 18 seconds behind leader Thor Hushovd of Norway.
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SPORTS
May 7, 1989
John Tomac of Chatsworth finished 20th in Saturday's first stage of the $250,000 Tour de Trump, moving him into 30th place in the richest bicycle race in U. S. history. Tomac, who was 38th in Friday's prologue, was timed in 4 hours, 36 minutes, 7 seconds for the 110-mile road race from Albany to New Paltz, N. Y. His combined time of 4:40.55 puts him 1:23 behind leader Viatcheslav Ekimov of the Soviet Union. The 837-mile race continues today with its longest stage, a 123-mile stretch from New York City to Lehigh Valley, Pa.
SPORTS
May 14, 1989 | BILL GLAUBER, Baltimore Sun
The ceremony is now familiar. The cyclists gather at the starting line, politicians are introduced, an announcer plugs the race sponsors and Greg LeMond steps forward to receive the loudest cheers. "It's nice," he says. "But it's also embarrassing." The American who conquered Paris is back home, more popular than ever, but struggling to regain the form that propelled him to the 1986 Tour de France title. Clearly, LeMond is the marquee figure of the inaugural Tour de Trump.
SPORTS
May 12, 1989
Eric Vanderarden of Belgium continued his surge toward the lead, winning two stages of the Tour de Trump bicycle race. Vanderaerden, who began the day in third place, 2:09 behind overall leader Dag Otto Lauritzen, rode conservatively through much of the 97-mile Charlottesville to Richmond Road Race before using his teammates' drafting help to win the sixth stage in 3 hours 21 minutes 29 seconds. Vanderaerden also won the night nine-mile Richmond Individual Time Trial in 18:47 and trails Lauritzen, a former Norwegian police officer and military officer, by one minute with three stages left.
SPORTS
May 14, 1989 | BILL GLAUBER, Baltimore Sun
The ceremony is now familiar. The cyclists gather at the starting line, politicians are introduced, an announcer plugs the race sponsors and Greg LeMond steps forward to receive the loudest cheers. "It's nice," he says. "But it's also embarrassing." The American who conquered Paris is back home, more popular than ever, but struggling to regain the form that propelled him to the 1986 Tour de France title. Clearly, LeMond is the marquee figure of the inaugural Tour de Trump.
SPORTS
July 6, 2004 | From Associated Press
While Lance Armstrong played it safe, Robbie McEwen sprinted to victory Monday in a crash-filled second stage of the Tour de France. Armstrong kept his drive for a record sixth consecutive Tour victory on track by placing comfortably down in the field -- along with several key rivals -- in 85th place. Armstrong's biggest threat, 1997 Tour winner Jan Ullrich, finished 38th, in the same time as the Texan. Armstrong is in fourth place overall, 18 seconds behind leader Thor Hushovd of Norway.
SPORTS
August 16, 1989
Viatcheslav Ekimov of the Soviet Union returned to the top of the amateur individual pursuit competition with a victory today at the World Cycling Championships. Ekimov was timed in 4 minutes, 35.58 seconds for the 4-kilometer distance in easily defeating East Germany's Jens Lehmann, who finished in 4:42.17. Ekimov won the title in 1985 and 1986 but lost in 1987 to countryman Guintaoutas Umaras, who went on to take the Olympic title in Seoul.
SPORTS
August 17, 1989 | Associated Press
Viatcheslav Ekimov of the Soviet Union returned to the top of the amateur individual pursuit competition with a victory today in the World Cycling Championships. Ekimov said he will turn professional soon, a route many Soviet athletes are taking these days. "I have had a number of proposals from teams in France, the United States, Italy, the Netherlands and Spain," Ekimov said. "It is certain I will turn professional and concentrate on the road races." Ekimov was timed in 4 minutes 35.
SPORTS
October 3, 1987 | JULIE CART
Cycling teams from the United States and the Soviet Union will meet for the first time in dual-meet competition today and Sunday in the Michelob Challenge at the Olympic Velodrome at Cal State Dominguez Hills in Carson. Among those on the U.S. team are 1984 Olympic gold medalist Mark Gorski, silver medalist Nelson Vails and current national sprint champion Scott Berryman. Among the women are three-time world champion Connie Paraskevin-Young and Olympic silver medalist Rebecca Twigg-Whitehead.
SPORTS
May 12, 1989
Eric Vanderarden of Belgium continued his surge toward the lead, winning two stages of the Tour de Trump bicycle race. Vanderaerden, who began the day in third place, 2:09 behind overall leader Dag Otto Lauritzen, rode conservatively through much of the 97-mile Charlottesville to Richmond Road Race before using his teammates' drafting help to win the sixth stage in 3 hours 21 minutes 29 seconds. Vanderaerden also won the night nine-mile Richmond Individual Time Trial in 18:47 and trails Lauritzen, a former Norwegian police officer and military officer, by one minute with three stages left.
SPORTS
May 8, 1989
Henk Lubberding of the Netherlands won the 123-mile New York to Lehigh Valley stage, but Dag-Otto Lauritzen of Norway took over as the overall leader of the Tour de Trump at Allentown, Pa. Lauritzen, the third overall leader in three days, placed second in the stage to overtake Viatcheslav Ekimov of the Soviet Union. Lubberding, 35, the oldest rider in the field, was timed in 5 hours 40 minutes 17 seconds in the longest race in the 10-day event. Paul Curran of England finished third, four seconds back of Lubberding.
SPORTS
May 7, 1989
John Tomac of Chatsworth finished 20th in Saturday's first stage of the $250,000 Tour de Trump, moving him into 30th place in the richest bicycle race in U. S. history. Tomac, who was 38th in Friday's prologue, was timed in 4 hours, 36 minutes, 7 seconds for the 110-mile road race from Albany to New Paltz, N. Y. His combined time of 4:40.55 puts him 1:23 behind leader Viatcheslav Ekimov of the Soviet Union. The 837-mile race continues today with its longest stage, a 123-mile stretch from New York City to Lehigh Valley, Pa.
SPORTS
August 19, 1989 | Associated Press
France's Jeannie Longo and the East German men's team added more gold medals to their collections as they won titles Friday in the World Cycling Championships. Longo gained her third women's individual pursuit title by winning the three-kilometer event, and the East Germans took the men's team pursuit, upsetting Olympic champion Soviet Union. Longo, who holds numerous world records, had to come from behind to beat Petra Rossner of East Germany in 3 minutes 54.45 seconds.
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