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Viatical Settlement Industry

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BUSINESS
June 20, 1995 | KATHY M. KRISTOF
Will Sweet has AIDS and, maybe, 18 months to live. With no job and limited assets, you might expect the 42-year-old San Francisco resident to be struggling to get by. But he's living it up--taking trips with friends and giving his family costly gifts--thanks, in part, to investors who will make a profit when he dies.
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BUSINESS
September 20, 1998
Gloria Wolk got involved in the AIDS crisis while walking her dog. Shortly after a neighbor asked if he could join her on her daily strolls, the Laguna Hills-based life insurance agent learned that "this handsome young man" was dying. Wolk, a divorcee with three grown children, began to volunteer at an AIDS help organization, where she met more young men--and a few young women--who were dying too.
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BUSINESS
September 20, 1998
Gloria Wolk got involved in the AIDS crisis while walking her dog. Shortly after a neighbor asked if he could join her on her daily strolls, the Laguna Hills-based life insurance agent learned that "this handsome young man" was dying. Wolk, a divorcee with three grown children, began to volunteer at an AIDS help organization, where she met more young men--and a few young women--who were dying too.
BUSINESS
June 20, 1995 | KATHY M. KRISTOF
How can you get the best settlement possible from your insurance policy? Some tips from the experts: * Check with your insurer. About 10% of the nation's insurers offer accelerated benefits on life insurance policies. For someone who has a very short time to live and wants to leave some money to dependents, this may be the best option. Even if the policy doesn't specify an accelerated benefit option, the company may make an exception. * Shop around.
BUSINESS
June 20, 1995 | KATHY M. KRISTOF
How can you get the best settlement possible from your insurance policy? Some tips from the experts: * Check with your insurer. About 10% of the nation's insurers offer accelerated benefits on life insurance policies. For someone who has a very short time to live and wants to leave some money to dependents, this may be the best option. Even if the policy doesn't specify an accelerated benefit option, the company may make an exception. * Shop around.
BUSINESS
September 13, 1996 | KATHY M. KRISTOF
Cash for the dying The viatical settlement industry, a business that largely sprang up to buy life insurance policies from terminally ill AIDS patients, is undergoing a transformation in the wake of medical advances in the treatment of AIDS.
BUSINESS
June 20, 1995 | KATHY M. KRISTOF
Will Sweet has AIDS and, maybe, 18 months to live. With no job and limited assets, you might expect the 42-year-old San Francisco resident to be struggling to get by. But he's living it up--taking trips with friends and giving his family costly gifts--thanks, in part, to investors who will make a profit when he dies.
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