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January 14, 1986 | JANE GREENSTEIN, Greenstein, a Times intern, is a recent graduate of USC.
A looming, 17-foot sound sculpture, looking something like a sleek, space-age jungle gym and echoing the whoosh of the wind, is now keeping company with the more austere statues of war heroes in Pershing Square. But hearing the sculpture's designer, Robert Wilhite, tell the story, it's a minor miracle that the piece is standing there. Wilhite's biggest problem wasn't the sheer mass of it. Or having the thick steel cut in a six-foot-tall cone shape at its top.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2014 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
In front of me, the movie screen starts at the floor and rises so high it's like seeing "Divergent" on the side of a building. At the moment warrior princess Tris, played by a fierce Shailene Woodley, is about to jump onto a speeding train. I can feel the train coming. Seriously, I can feel it. The subwoofers embedded in the cushy comfort of the theater's reclining chairs let the sound vibrate through my body. Tris' jump, just seconds before the platform she's running on ends over a dead drop, is stomach churning even on an ordinary screen.
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SPORTS
October 2, 2009 | ERIC SONDHEIMER, ON HIGH SCHOOLS
As the youngest of nine children, Jonathan McNeal has learned right from wrong. "I grew up around older people, so I had to mature faster," the Venice High football player says. He's intensely loyal to the Venice community, where he has lived for nine years. He takes walks to Venice Beach and knows the people who hang out there, whether they are street performers or Muscle Beach regulars. He has been known to run from Venice Pier to Santa Monica Pier wearing a 40-pound vest.
SCIENCE
October 29, 2013 | By Karen Kaplan
Warning: Driving a truck for a living can be hazardous to your health - if you are diagnosed with prostate cancer, researchers said Tuesday. Prostate cancer is the most common type of cancer diagnosed in men, and in most cases it's basically harmless. As the National Cancer Institute says, even patients who never get their tumors treated are likely to die of something other than prostate cancer. So, instead of looking at prostate cancer risk, the researchers who did the new study focused on the risk that the cancer would be aggressive at the time of diagnosis.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 30, 1995 | DENNIS HUNT
It's incredible that a band capable of the 1965 hit single "Hang On Sloopy"--a buoyant pop-rock reworking of the Vibrations' funky "My Girl Sloopy"--could do nothing else that was even half-decent. In this collection of mid-'60s pop tracks by this Midwestern teen band, the covers--"Fever" and "Come On Let's Go"--are particularly dreadful.
SPORTS
June 14, 1997
It's not bad chemistry in the clubhouse that's hexing the Dodgers, the bad karma is stadium-wide. The Dodgers were doomed from opening day when they introduced the "Super Dodger Dog" and lost. As a connoisseur of stadium culinary fare, I have always rated the Dodger Dog as the ultimate national pastime cuisine. By referring to a product that is only fatter as "Super," the franchise disses the venerable "regular" dog and produces disharmony with the basic vibrations of L.A. Restore the glory of the Dodger Dog and victory will surely follow.
SCIENCE
November 15, 2012 | By Jon Bardin
Despite the fact that a katydid's ears are located on its hind legs, the rain forest insect's hearing works in a strikingly similar fashion to human hearing, according to a new study published Thursday in the journal Science. Mammalian hearing is enabled by a three-part system. First, a sound arrives at the eardrum, causing it to vibrate. Then, those vibrations in the air are converted to vibrations in liquid by the middle ear, which is made up of those three bones everyone loved to memorize in middle school biology: the hammer, anvil and stirrup.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 1993
Regarding Ron Jacobs' letter last Sunday in response to your article "Back When Jocks Were Boss" (April 25): The record should be "de-warped" completely. Jacobs was correct to a point. Brian Wilson of the Beach Boys did not place a late-night call asking if KHJ wanted an exclusive on "Good Vibrations." However, as Wilson tells in his autobiography, "Wouldn't It Be Nice," he called the station offering to premiere his follow-up to "Good Vibrations," "Heroes and Villains." I produce "The Charlie Tuna Show" on KCBS-FM.
NEWS
February 16, 1987 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, Times Science Writer
Astronomers are using a new technique similar to that being used by geologists studying earthquakes to learn about the interior of the sun, scientists said here Sunday at a meeting of the American Assn. for the Advancement of Science. The new technique, called helioseismology, has already provided surprising information about the sun's rotation and new data about the composition and temperature of the interior, said astrophysicist Robert W.
NEWS
December 6, 2012 | By Michael Ordoña
Robert Zemeckis' "Flight" is a sober drama about addiction, with Denzel Washington as boozy airline pilot Whip Whitaker. But what launches the story is a bravura sequence in which Whip undertakes extraordinary measures to try to save his crippled, diving plane and the 102 people on board. Here, we speak with the craft people involved in creating the edge-of-your-seat crash scene. (Script excerpts by screenwriter John Gatins). INT. COCKPIT - DAY EVANS Descend and maintain 30 thousand.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 2013 | By Chris Barton, Los Angeles Times Jazz Critic
There was a moment at the Hollywood Bowl on Saturday night when a question came to mind that felt a little like a Zen koan: If you hear a guitar solo but can't see a guitar, did the solo really happen? It's the sort of thought perhaps associated with backing tracks and radio-ready pop, but this was the Playboy Jazz Festival, and the source was unquestionably live in the vocal group Naturally 7, which closed a set steeped with hip-hop and R&B with an a cappella take on George Harrison's "While My Guitar Gently Weeps.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Pop star and actor Rick Springfield will publish his first novel, "Magnificent Vibration," in 2014, and it looks like it's going to be pretty wacky. That's despite its mainstream pedigree; "Magnificent Vibration" is coming to us from Touchstone, an imprint of Simon & Schuster. Here's Touchstone's description: "[T]he novel portrays a hero who has hit a dead end in his life, but who serendipitously receives a 1-800 phone connection to God via an inscription in a mysterious self-help book that may just give him a shot at saving the planet.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 2013 | By Don Heckman, Special to The Times
Paul Tanner, a trombonist with the Glenn Miller Orchestra who became a prominent jazz educator at UCLA and created an unusual electronic musical instrument heard on the Beach Boys' classic 1966 hit "Good Vibrations," has died. He was 95. Tanner died of pneumonia Tuesday at an assisted-living facility near his home in Carlsbad, Calif., said his wife, Jan. Tanner was a member of the Miller Orchestra, one of the best-known swing bands of the 1930s and '40s, for most of the orchestra's existence of less than a decade.
NEWS
December 6, 2012 | By Michael Ordoña
Robert Zemeckis' "Flight" is a sober drama about addiction, with Denzel Washington as boozy airline pilot Whip Whitaker. But what launches the story is a bravura sequence in which Whip undertakes extraordinary measures to try to save his crippled, diving plane and the 102 people on board. Here, we speak with the craft people involved in creating the edge-of-your-seat crash scene. (Script excerpts by screenwriter John Gatins). INT. COCKPIT - DAY EVANS Descend and maintain 30 thousand.
SCIENCE
November 15, 2012 | By Jon Bardin
Despite the fact that a katydid's ears are located on its hind legs, the rain forest insect's hearing works in a strikingly similar fashion to human hearing, according to a new study published Thursday in the journal Science. Mammalian hearing is enabled by a three-part system. First, a sound arrives at the eardrum, causing it to vibrate. Then, those vibrations in the air are converted to vibrations in liquid by the middle ear, which is made up of those three bones everyone loved to memorize in middle school biology: the hammer, anvil and stirrup.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 26, 2012 | Suzanne Muchnic, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Karl Benjamin, a painter of dazzling geometric abstractions who established a national reputation in 1959 as one of four Los Angeles-based Abstract Classicists and created a highly acclaimed body of work that celebrates the glories of color in all its variations, has died. He was 86. Benjamin died Thursday of congestive heart failure at his home in Claremont, said his daughter Beth Marie Benjamin. His work had been displayed last year in "Karl Benjamin and the Evolution of the Abstraction, 1950-1980" at the Louis Stern Fine Arts gallery in West Hollywood as part of the region-wide Pacific Standard Time exhibitions.
HOME & GARDEN
March 9, 2006 | David A. Keeps, Times Staff Writer
CALHOUN CHAPPELL felt the vibrations the minute he walked through the door in 1994. Not the seismic kind of vibrations that makes you anxious, but the cosmic variety that makes you feel at home. Perched on a hill with the Silver Lake reservoir shimmering in the distance, the 1936 Streamline Moderne treasure brought back childhood memories -- not only of the postwar redwood ranch that his architect father built on the St.
NEWS
April 26, 1987 | DAVID HALDANE, Times Staff Writer
The wooden floor of the gymnasium at Hughes Junior High School vibrated last week with the strains of Beethoven, Mozart and Bizet. On it--divided into two separate sessions--sat about 500 hearing-impaired children who otherwise might not have heard a thing. "The loud music felt like you were driving over a bumpy road and the soft music felt like you were floating on water," declared Stefanie Ellis, 11, speaking in sign language through an interpreter.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 9, 2012 | By Jay Levin, The Record
Well before "Madden NFL" video games, there was a quirky tabletop toy called Electric Football. Surely you remember it: Metal playing field. Two teams of 11 plastic football players, each standing on a rectangular base with prongs on the bottom and a knob on the side. At the beginning of each play, the human "coach" sets the players in the desired position and puts the football in the hands of one. A switch is flicked, the gridiron vibrates and the players move - often wildly in every direction.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 2012 | By Mark Olsen
A polite comedy about a potentially rude subject,"Hysteria"takes its title from the medical condition diagnosed to women in Victorian England for any number of unrelated symptoms. As a treatment, doctors would stimulate a woman to orgasm, referred to as "manual massage to paroxysm," leading one beleaguered physician, essentially as a labor-saving device, to invent the vibrator. In the film, which opens in Los Angeles on May 18, the progressive young doctor Mortimer Granville (Hugh Dancy)
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