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NEWS
January 10, 2000
Vic Schoen, 83, a musician, composer and arranger who was the longtime musical director for the Andrews Sisters. Born in Brooklyn, N.Y., Schoen played trumpet at local nightclubs while still in high school, and music became his life. He arranged and composed for some of the most popular musicians of the era before rock 'n' roll, among them Tommy Dorsey, Count Basie, Harry James, the Weavers and Dinah Shore.
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NEWS
January 10, 2000
Vic Schoen, 83, a musician, composer and arranger who was the longtime musical director for the Andrews Sisters. Born in Brooklyn, N.Y., Schoen played trumpet at local nightclubs while still in high school, and music became his life. He arranged and composed for some of the most popular musicians of the era before rock 'n' roll, among them Tommy Dorsey, Count Basie, Harry James, the Weavers and Dinah Shore.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 8, 2000 | JEFF GOTTLIEB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vic Schoen, a musician, composer and arranger who worked with legendary performers from Al Jolson to Glenn Miller to Pat Boone, died Wednesday of pneumonia. He was 83. "Vic could write anything," his widow, Sally-Jan Calbeck Schoen, said Friday from the couple's home in Corona del Mar. "Vic could arrange anything. He could write Big Band falling out of bed. That's his quote. "He never retired," she said. "His music would never leave him alone to do that."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 8, 2000 | JEFF GOTTLIEB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vic Schoen, a musician, composer and arranger who worked with legendary performers from Al Jolson to Glenn Miller to Pat Boone, died Wednesday of pneumonia. He was 83. "Vic could write anything," his widow, Sally-Jan Calbeck Schoen, said Friday from the couple's home in Corona del Mar. "Vic could arrange anything. He could write Big Band falling out of bed. That's his quote. "He never retired," she said. "His music would never leave him alone to do that."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 28, 1995 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
After composer-arranger Vic Schoen concluded his opening piece at the Red Lion Hotel on Sunday, Les Brown had a question: "Can you hear it?" he asked the packed ballroom. Brown's inquiry brought a big laugh from the crowd assembled for the 25th anniversary edition of the Orange County Musicians' Assn.'s Bash. Of course they could hear it--Schoen's piece had been written for the muscle of dual big bands.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 1995 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The scene in the rehearsal auditorium at the Musicians' Union local a couple of days before Thanksgiving wasn't much different than one on the cover of a 1959 Kapp label recording, "Suite for Two Bands." Two orchestras, each with its own director, sat side by side. On the album cover, each conductor sported a tuxedo and a healthy head of dark hair.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 1997 | ROBERT HILBURN
The Andrews Sisters, the female pop vocal trio of the late '30s and '40s, may be known best today as the group that originally did "Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy," one of Bette Midler's signature tunes. And the reference point isn't a bad one. Patty, Maxene and LaVerne Andrews didn't tell Sophie Tucker jokes or dance about in mermaid costumes a la the party-minded Midler, but one of the most appealing elements in their music was a liberating sense of fun.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 2000
A selective look at deaths in arts and entertainment from Jan. 1 through Dec. 20. For a more comprehensive list, visit the Calendar Web site at www.calendarlive.com. George Carl, vaudeville, circus, movie comedian, 83, Jan. 1 "Skipper Frank" Herman, '50s KTLA kids-show host, 83, Jan. 4 Henry Pleasants, critic who recognized jazz as serious music, 89, Jan. 4 Lucas Hoving, dancer, choreographer, teacher, 87, Jan. 5 Vic Schoen, composer, arranger, Andrews Sisters musical director, 83, Jan.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 28, 1995 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
After composer-arranger Vic Schoen concluded his opening piece at the Red Lion Hotel on Sunday, Les Brown had a question: "Can you hear it?" he asked the packed ballroom. Brown's inquiry brought a big laugh from the crowd assembled for the 25th anniversary edition of the Orange County Musicians' Assn.'s Bash. Of course they could hear it--Schoen's piece had been written for the muscle of dual big bands.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 1995 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The scene in the rehearsal auditorium at the Musicians' Union local a couple of days before Thanksgiving wasn't much different than one on the cover of a 1959 Kapp label recording, "Suite for Two Bands." Two orchestras, each with its own director, sat side by side. On the album cover, each conductor sported a tuxedo and a healthy head of dark hair.
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