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Vice President Dan Quayle

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 13, 1992 | PAUL RICHTER and DAVE LESHER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Vice President Dan Quayle exploded in fury at the press Wednesday, charging that questioning President Bush about an allegation of a romantic affair was done in order to help Democrat Bill Clinton. "When you talk about sleaze, I think some in the press ought to look in the mirror," Quayle said during a campaign stop in Huntington Beach. Launching into a lecture to about 30 newspeople that lasted several minutes, Quayle said: "Now, what's the motivation in all of this?
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NEWS
August 11, 1992 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vice President Dan Quayle stumped through the Central Valley on Monday afternoon trying to reassure ranchers that the Bush Administration sides with them in their fights with environmentalists and government rule-writers. "We're here to let you know that we're on your side," the vice president told a group of cattle ranchers, as they chatted in a picturesque hay-barn that happened to make a perfect setting for the evening news. After meeting with 10 members of the California Cattleman's Assn.
NEWS
July 31, 1992 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A onetime Florida Republican Party chairman took out a full-page ad in the Washington Post on Thursday urging Vice President Dan Quayle to resign from the GOP ticket and asking the public to join his "Step Aside for America" campaign. A Quayle spokesman brushed off the $45,000 ad, calling its sponsor "a maverick" while repeating recent statements by President Bush and Quayle that the vice president's status is secure. The ad, paid for by L. E.
NEWS
July 28, 1992 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vice President Dan Quayle delivered a ringing defense of the Bush Administration on Monday while striving to put to rest speculation that his place on the Republican ticket is in peril. "This is a closed issue. It's past tense," Quayle snapped at one point, clearly irritated by the unrelenting barrage of reporters' questions about his status at every campaign stop here and in Ohio earlier in the day.
OPINION
July 26, 1992 | John P. Sears, John P. Sears, a political analyst, served as Ronald Reagan's campaign manager in 1976 and 1980
The rumors are flying that before the Republicans meet in Houston next month, Vice President Dan Quayle will be sacrificed to save President George Bush from embarrassing de feat next November. If Bush's plight were so easy to fix, I would even favor it. But just as Murphy Brown is not responsible for the deterioration of American family values, Quayle cannot be blamed for Bush's problems.
NEWS
July 25, 1992 | JULES WITCOVER, THE BALTIMORE SUN
The other day in Boston, peals of laughter greeted Republican Gov. William F. Weld of Massachusetts when he told State House reporters he considered Vice President Dan Quayle "the best political mind in the White House." But Weld went on to argue that the much-ridiculed vice president is "very quick in his judgments and I think sure" on matters of politics.
NEWS
July 3, 1992 | CATHLEEN DECKER, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
Vice President Dan Quayle dropped in on Arkansas Gov. Bill Clinton's hometown Thursday to launch an assault on the putative Democratic nominee's economic strategy but found his maneuver undercut by the release of rising unemployment figures. Quayle, who rarely hesitates to gleefully bash his opponents, was uncharacteristically somber and subdued. He called Clinton's plan a "pipe dream" that failed to adequately address the root of the nation's economic problems.
NEWS
June 23, 1992 | CATHLEEN DECKER, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
After weeks of alternately trying to define and castigate the "cultural elite" that he contends is ruining America, Vice President Dan Quayle set out Monday to be their opposite number. He dished hot dogs at a San Diego youth center. He ventured into a Mission Valley supermarket to buy chocolate chip cookies. And he brought his lengthy armor-plated motorcade to a screeching halt in Westchester when he found himself in front of a pillar of anti-elitism: a bowling alley.
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