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Vice Presidential Debate

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NEWS
October 11, 2012 | By Doyle McManus
First things first: Vice presidential debates don't really matter. The half-life of Thursday's debate between Joe Biden and Paul Ryan will be exactly four days -- until next week's rematch between President Obama and Mitt Romney. And given the wonkiness of the debate -- from Libya to taxes to Afghanistan to Medicare -- the television image that will be repeated most often will be Biden's sardonic grin, which sometimes seemed out of place, especially when the subject was foreign policy.
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OPINION
October 16, 2012 | Jonah Goldberg
Apparently, Paul Ryan and Joe Biden are both theocrats willing, nay eager, to use state power to impose their religious views on the rest of us. In last week's vice presidential debate, moderator Martha Raddatz asked the two Roman Catholic politicians "to tell me what role your religion has played in your own personal views on abortion. " "I don't see how a person can separate their public life from their private life or from their faith," confessed Ryan. "Our faith informs us in everything we do. My faith informs me about how to take care of the vulnerable, of how to make sure that people have a chance in life.
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NEWS
October 11, 2012 | By Morgan Little
Republican candidate Paul Ryan will face off against Vice President Joe Biden Thursday night at 6 p.m. PDT in the first and only vice presidential debate, held in Danville, Ky. Ryan, 42, and Biden, 69, will meet after a week of anticipation, in a duel moderated by Martha Raddatz of ABC News. Biden, who has extensive debating experience, having served in the Senate for years before running for president and then becoming vice president, was expected to deliver a “robust debate,” the Obama campaign predicted.
NEWS
October 16, 2012 | By Jon Healey
The questions asked at Tuesday night's presidential debate will be left to a coterie of undecided voters assembled by Gallup pollsters, so don't be surprised if they invite President Obama and his Republican opponent, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney, to pander to address concerns unique to their lines of work, their favorite causes or the problems they face as individuals. For example, that might include questions about whether the government is doing enough about cancer or Alzheimer's disease, or why Washington bailed out the big banks but not a local business whose line of credit dried up. Personally, I like those questions.
NEWS
October 11, 2012 | By Alexandra Le Tellier
Joe Biden and Paul Ryan squared off in Kentucky on Thursday night, clashing on a range of issues, including  Iran sanctions , abortion, healthcare and rescuing the middle class. We assembled a group of opinionators from the left, right and center to comment on the VP candidates' positions in real time . Unlike the first presidential debate, in which there was a clear winner , Thursday's outcome wasn't as clear, although it looks like Biden will get the edge. Here's our panel's instant analysis.
SPORTS
October 15, 2012 | By Houston Mitchell
  "Saturday Night Live" parody of the vice presidential debate got a little help at the end from Olympics 100-meter gold medalist Usain Bolt. It happened near the end of the segment, when Taran Killam, playing Paul Ryan, claims he won the 100-meter race at the London Olympics. After Jason Sudeikis, playing Joe Biden, says he did not, Ryan asks his training partner, Bolt, to come out and verify his claims. Without spoiling it for those who want to watch it above, let's just say Bolt doesn't exactly stand by Ryan's claims.
NEWS
October 12, 2012 | By Michael McGough
Without the advantage (or contamination) of listening to other instant analysts, I gave the debate to Vice President Joe Biden on style and on the substance of economic and tax policy. Rehearsed or not, his exasperation with Rep. Paul Ryan's posturing was engaging, not overbearing, and he checked the "47%" and "don't voucherize Medicare" boxes. With some aid from the moderator, he pounced on Ryan for teasing the voters about which tax breaks Mitt Romney would eliminate to offset his tax cuts.
NEWS
October 6, 1988 | Associated Press
About 50 million viewers tuned into the vice presidential debate Wednesday night, according to preliminary figures from the 16 largest television markets released today by A. C. Nielsen Co. All three networks and CNN carried the debate between Sens. Lloyd Bentsen and Dan Quayle live from Omaha. ABC had a rating of 14.1, NBC had a 12.1 and CBS had 8.8. A National League playoff game between the L.A. Dodgers and New York Mets followed the debate on ABC.
NEWS
October 16, 1992 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With a speech, visual props and even jokes, Vice President Dan Quayle and his campaign continued working hard Thursday to get across its view that he won the vice presidential debate with Sen. Al Gore. At a rally at the Owensboro Grain Co., Quayle insisted that Gore had failed to defend his running mate, Bill Clinton, when Quayle attacked Clinton's character and truthfulness at the debate in Atlanta on Tuesday. Now, "it's two days after the debate and Sen.
SPORTS
October 7, 2004 | Larry Stewart, From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Ratings were off 21% for Fox's first prime-time telecast of baseball postseason, due mainly to Tuesday night's vice presidential debate. Game 1 of the New York-Minnesota series, won by the Twins, 2-0, drew only a 5.9 national rating and a 9% share of the audience. Most of the game faced competition from the vice presidential debate, which was carried by six networks and drew a combined 28.1 rating. Last year, Fox's first prime-time telecast of the postseason -- Game 1 of the Chicago Cubs vs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 16, 2012 | Steve Lopez
Telana Starks was watching her niece play in a sandbox Monday afternoon in Lafayette Park when I asked if she was following the presidential campaign. She said she hadn't really been paying any attention, which was interesting because the candidates haven't been paying any attention to her either. Starks makes about $700 a month as a home healthcare provider and would like to find time for another job and money for college, but she's busy looking after family who need her help. Kathleen O'Malley, whose granddaughter was playing with Starks' niece, said she's working as a dog walker to supplement her Social Security check.
SPORTS
October 15, 2012 | By Houston Mitchell
  "Saturday Night Live" parody of the vice presidential debate got a little help at the end from Olympics 100-meter gold medalist Usain Bolt. It happened near the end of the segment, when Taran Killam, playing Paul Ryan, claims he won the 100-meter race at the London Olympics. After Jason Sudeikis, playing Joe Biden, says he did not, Ryan asks his training partner, Bolt, to come out and verify his claims. Without spoiling it for those who want to watch it above, let's just say Bolt doesn't exactly stand by Ryan's claims.
OPINION
October 14, 2012 | Doyle McManus
What do undecided voters want from presidential candidates, anyway? Not much. Just clearer answers, a sense of firm leadership - and a credible promise that the next four years will bring more bipartisan cooperation than the last four. "I'll vote for the person that gives me the most clarity," Calvin Smith, 70, a retired high school teacher in Columbus, Ohio, said last week. "I've heard enough visions. I want concrete, step-by-step instructions. " PHOTOS: 2012 vice presidential debate In a polarized election year, the dwindling ranks of undecided voters have become objects of wonderment and even ridicule.
NEWS
October 12, 2012 | By Matea Gold
WASHINGTON - The rollicking debate between Vice President Joe Biden and Republican challenger Paul D. Ryan Thursday night drew 51.4 million television viewers, a 26% smaller audience than watched Biden face off against Sarah Palin in 2008, according to Nielsen. That much-anticipated showdown drew close to 70 million viewers and was on in 45% of households in top local markets. TRANSCRIPT: Read Biden, Ryan's arguments But Thursday's event still drew one of the most sizable audiences for a vice presidential debate in recent elections.
NATIONAL
October 12, 2012 | By Paul West
Washington Bureau DANVILLE, Ky. - Whether Thursday's debate between Joe Biden and Paul D. Ryan moved the needle in the presidential contest may have been the only major question left hanging at the end. The vice presidential showdown was everything the first presidential debate was not: wide-ranging and lively, with very different sorts of passion from each side. It was, in short, 90 nonstop minutes of political theater of a kind that rarely materializes in these high-profile, and often stiff and predictable, televised encounters.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 12, 2012 | By Meredith Blake
Thursday night's “Colbert Report” was taped a few hours before Rep. Paul Ryan and Vice President Joe Biden faced off in Kentucky, but that didn't stop Stephen Colbert from weighing on in the debate.   After joking that “I haven't seen it yet. Nor will I ever -- it's a vice presidential debate,” Colbert claimed the incumbent vice president probably had something of an advantage going into the evening: “The key to winning one of these debates is lower expectations about your speaking skills, and Joe Biden 's been doing that for four years.” Another problem for Ryan?
OPINION
October 7, 2004
Re "Edwards Woos Another Jury," editorial, Oct. 6: The editorial says, "You must filter out Sen. John Edwards' superiority at skills that have little relevance to running the country." Why do you find these skills irrelevant to the job at hand? I would say a man who thinks on his feet and can articulate principle is exactly what is relevant to leadership. Key interpersonal skills of a vice president and president are crucial to winning support in Congress, in diplomacy, in striking a balance between opposing forces.
NEWS
October 12, 2012 | By Michael McGough
Without the advantage (or contamination) of listening to other instant analysts, I gave the debate to Vice President Joe Biden on style and on the substance of economic and tax policy. Rehearsed or not, his exasperation with Rep. Paul Ryan's posturing was engaging, not overbearing, and he checked the "47%" and "don't voucherize Medicare" boxes. With some aid from the moderator, he pounced on Ryan for teasing the voters about which tax breaks Mitt Romney would eliminate to offset his tax cuts.
NATIONAL
October 12, 2012 | By Mark Z. Barabak and Maeve Reston, Los Angeles Times
Clashing in a feisty, hard-edged debate, Vice President Joe Biden on Thursday night repeatedly accused challenger Paul D. Ryan and his running mate, Mitt Romney, of favoring the rich at the expense of middle-class Americans and engaging in loose talk that could lead the country to another war. Ryan responded by saying Biden and President Obama had failed to turn the country around economically and, lacking accomplishments, were engaged in the...
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