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Vicent Fox

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NEWS
February 15, 2001 | JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A U.S.-Mexican panel Wednesday urged Presidents Bush and Vicente Fox to craft a migration strategy that would meet both nations' labor needs and defuse tensions over illegal Mexican migration to the United States. The group's study was issued just two days before Bush is to visit Mexico for the first meeting between the two new presidents. Both have said migration will be a key theme of their talks.
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WORLD
September 2, 2013 | By Richard Fausset
SAN CRISTOBAL, Mexico - Former President Vicente Fox grew up on a farm here in rural Guanajuato, one of Mexico's most conservative states. He is the kind of guy who wears big belt buckles, collects hand-tooled saddles and worships the free market. Ask him about his experience with the drug culture and the big man with the cowboy-movie mustache exhibits a kind of straight-laced pique: Never smoked pot, he says. Hardly knew anyone who did. But Fox has always fancied himself a policy maverick.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 5, 2000
Re "Mexico's Ruling Party Loses Presidency in Historic Election," July 3: Mexico is free at last! I wish that my father, a native of Mexico, had lived to see the PRI booted from power. He would have been so proud of his fellow countrymen. This Fourth of July, as I recall and honor the sacrifices of our American forefathers, I will also toast Vicente Fox and wish him and our neighbors in Mexico success in their quest to establish true freedom fully for the first time. ART PEDROZA JR. Santa Ana Time will tell if this former Coca-Cola executive is the "real thing."
WORLD
June 6, 2013 | By Tracy Wilkinson
MEXICO CITY -- Vicente Fox, the former president of Mexico, was one of the earliest and most prominent voices in favor of legalizing marijuana here. Now he says he would also become a grower. Fox, who is known for provocative statements, argues that legalizing and regulating marijuana production would deprive violent drug traffickers of their profits. And then legitimate growers would naturally take over production, he says. “I am a farmer,” Fox told reporters this week at his Fox Center in central Mexico's Guanajuato state.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 2001
Re "California Shouldn't Fear Fox's Mexico," March 25: In order to justify the main thesis in the headline, Dana Parsons refers to an opinion of "an expert witness--Frank D. Bean, director of the Center for Research on Immigration, Population and Public Policy at UC Irvine." After introducing the center as nonpartisan, he quotes Bean saying that "he expects the Latin immigration of this generation to resemble the pattern of Europeans in the 18th and 19th centuries." Unfortunately, Californians have some good reasons to fear Fox's calls for "open borders," and Bean's opinion that the current wave of Mexican immigration is not different from the past waves seems to contradict not only what one can see but also what other experts are saying.
OPINION
August 25, 2002
Re "Fox Plugs Bill for Energy Reform," Aug. 21: It's ludicrous to think that Vicente Fox's "free-market agenda" helped him get elected as president of Mexico: That is the agenda of his core constituency only. Fox won the Mexican presidency because the Mexican people wanted to get rid of the old regime and realized that he was the candidate with the best chances of doing it. When it comes to advancing his political, moral, religious or economic agendas, he has to put up a fight. So far, he has failed to win many matches, and many Mexicans who voted for him are probably glad.
OPINION
December 10, 2000 | Gregory Rodriguez, Gregory Rodriguez is a fellow at the New America Foundation
Even before his historic election to Mexico's presidency in July, Vicente Fox startled U.S. observers when he vowed to govern on behalf of 118 million Mexicans--the 100 million in his country and the nearly 18 million of Mexican descent in the United States. Not surprisingly, the promise, along with Fox's vision of a more open U.S.-Mexico border, heightened anxieties that Mexican immigration poses a threat to U.S. national integrity.
OPINION
November 9, 2003
In reading "Mexico's Fox Pushes Immigration Reform on Southwest Visit" (Nov. 5), I was struck by the fact that a huge piece of the conversation was missing from this ongoing dialogue. Why aren't we talking about helping Mexico overhaul its governmental and economic infrastructure? Mexico is a beautiful country that could be prosperous, but so much potential is squandered by corrupt and inept leadership. We can spend billions of dollars (and, more important, lives) to invade Iraq to supposedly help that country "get on its feet," and we don't even discuss doing the same for Mexico?
OPINION
April 29, 2013 | By Vicente Fox
Throughout 2001, President George W. Bush and I spent time negotiating an important bilateral agreement on immigration policies and programs. We optimistically pieced together an innovative framework, and were close to reaching our goals, when the terrorist attacks on Sept. 11 derailed our plans. Now, in 2013, and in remarkably similar circumstances, President Obama and a bipartisan group of congressional leaders are again working courageously on immigration issues. I join the millions of voices echoing around the world in expressing my outrage and sorrow about the events in Boston this month.
OPINION
January 14, 2001 | RODERIC AI CAMP, Roderic Ai Camp, a professor of government at Claremont McKenna College, is the author of "Politics in Mexico: the Decline of Authoritarianism" (Oxford University Press, 1999)
The election of President Vicente Fox in Mexico has introduced some remarkable political changes that presage dramatic, long-term implications beyond this decade. First, and most important, before last July's election, only 40% of Mexicans believed their country was a democracy. Immediately after the election, 63% described Mexico as a democracy, a whopping 50%-plus increase.
OPINION
April 29, 2013 | By Vicente Fox
Throughout 2001, President George W. Bush and I spent time negotiating an important bilateral agreement on immigration policies and programs. We optimistically pieced together an innovative framework, and were close to reaching our goals, when the terrorist attacks on Sept. 11 derailed our plans. Now, in 2013, and in remarkably similar circumstances, President Obama and a bipartisan group of congressional leaders are again working courageously on immigration issues. I join the millions of voices echoing around the world in expressing my outrage and sorrow about the events in Boston this month.
WORLD
September 23, 2010 | By Ken Ellingwood, Los Angeles Times
The floats danced with whimsy. The fireworks wowed. The light show rocked. But a week after Mexico's bicentennial bash, inquiring minds have obsessed on another spectacle: Who was the really tall guy built of steel and off-white plastic? And (since this is conspiracy-minded Mexico), is the government concealing his real identity? The giant's name is El Coloso, or Colossus, a 60-foot-tall, square-jawed figure assembled by creators Jorge Vargas and Juan Carlos Canfield for Independence Day festivities.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 24, 2010 | By Victoria Kim
When several Beverly Hills investors told stories of being conned by a suave, heavy-set man who claimed to be former Mexican President Vicente Fox's brother in media reports a few years ago, a sternly-worded notice appeared on the man's website. "Just as power abhors a vacuum, modern journalism apparently abhors any type of due diligence and fact checking before scurrilous allegations are repeated as fact," said the notice posted on the "official site" of Alfredo Trujillo Fox, threatening legal action against his accusers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 2, 2010 | Patrick J. McDonnell
A suspected financial swindler who allegedly boasted he was the brother of former Mexican President Vicente Fox pleaded not guilty Monday to charges of stealing more than $600,000 through bogus investment plans, according to the Los Angeles County district attorney's office. Alfredo Trujillo Fox, 66, was arrested Saturday on a felony complaint and was being held in lieu of $1-million bail, said Jane Robison, a spokeswoman for the district attorney's office. He was arraigned Monday on 15 counts of grand theft, 15 counts of unqualified sales of securities, 15 counts of misrepresentation in sales of securities and two counts of tax evasion.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 2007 | Reed Johnson, Times Staff Writer
HERE'S some unsolicited advice for Mexico's former president Vicente Fox: When you write an autobiography in which you lambaste your political predecessors as "kleptopresidents" -- i.e., thieving fat cats who gorged themselves silly at the public trough -- it's best not to publish it shortly after appearing with your wife in a magazine photo spread featuring your lavish, multimillion-dollar ranch estate.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 27, 2007 | Scott Martelle, Times Staff Writer
Passions over international human rights issues have given rise to an unusual sight outside the Los Angeles Music Center: political protests. While protests are a sporadic element of life in Los Angeles, these demonstrations stand out because of their location -- in the heart of L.A.'s cultural center, where political dissent is usually channeled through works of art, not street protests.
BUSINESS
September 13, 2005 | Marla Dickerson, Times Staff Writer
Chinese President Hu Jintao pledged Monday to crack down on contraband Chinese merchandise coming into Mexico, whose ballooning trade deficit with the Asian nation has become a source of irritation here. Hu, who met with Mexican President Vicente Fox in Mexico's capital as part of a 10-day diplomatic swing through North America, is hoping to reduce trade friction between the exporting powerhouses.
WORLD
November 22, 2004 | Peter Wallsten and Richard Boudreaux, Times Staff Writers
President Bush vowed Sunday to push a plan that would allow undocumented immigrants to remain in the United States as guest workers even though it appears less likely to win backing in a Congress that grew more conservative in this month's elections. Bush made the commitment during a half-hour meeting with Mexican President Vicente Fox in the Chilean capital, where the two leaders are attending the annual Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation conference.
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