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Vicente Carrillo Fuentes

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NEWS
September 15, 2000 | CLAUDIA KOLKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federal officials on Thursday charged the alleged leader of a powerful Mexican drug cartel in the killing of a Mexican police official and nine other people, many of whose bodies were unearthed last year in a massive excavation along the U.S.-Mexico border. Authorities describe Vicente Carrillo Fuentes as overlord of the Ciudad Juarez, Mexico, drug cartel and allege he orchestrated the slayings to prevent informants from aiding drug agents.
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WORLD
July 5, 2005 | Marla Dickerson, Times Staff Writer
Mexican authorities said Monday that they thought they had arrested the leader of the Juarez drug cartel, but later said tests showed it was a case of mistaken identity. The determination that the detained man was not Vicente Carrillo Fuentes dashed hopes of a rare instance of good news for Mexico's anti-narcotics forces amid an upsurge of violence. It was also the second high-profile error in the last two weeks.
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WORLD
September 14, 2004 | Chris Kraul, Times Staff Writer
Thirteen drug-related killings in three days are the latest evidence that a turf war is raging among narcotics-smuggling gangs following the arrests of high-level cartel leaders, U.S. and Mexican officials said Monday. The violence also shows that new alliances are being struck between the drug cartels as they fight for control over transshipment points in the Pacific state of Sinaloa and drug export "platforms" along the U.S.-Mexico border such as Tijuana and Ciudad Juarez.
WORLD
September 14, 2004 | Chris Kraul, Times Staff Writer
Thirteen drug-related killings in three days are the latest evidence that a turf war is raging among narcotics-smuggling gangs following the arrests of high-level cartel leaders, U.S. and Mexican officials said Monday. The violence also shows that new alliances are being struck between the drug cartels as they fight for control over transshipment points in the Pacific state of Sinaloa and drug export "platforms" along the U.S.-Mexico border such as Tijuana and Ciudad Juarez.
WORLD
July 5, 2005 | Marla Dickerson, Times Staff Writer
Mexican authorities said Monday that they thought they had arrested the leader of the Juarez drug cartel, but later said tests showed it was a case of mistaken identity. The determination that the detained man was not Vicente Carrillo Fuentes dashed hopes of a rare instance of good news for Mexico's anti-narcotics forces amid an upsurge of violence. It was also the second high-profile error in the last two weeks.
NEWS
October 8, 1998 | CLAUDIA KOLKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federal authorities, making public a 27-count indictment, Wednesday identified Vicente Carrillo-Fuentes, brother of a Ciudad Juarez-area drug lord who died after plastic surgery in 1997, as the bloodily contested cartel's new leader. Although a federal grand jury had returned the sealed indictment in August 1997 and requested the extradition from Mexico in November, authorities only unsealed the documents this week.
WORLD
April 13, 2004 | From Reuters
A Mexican governor suspended an entire state police force Monday after two senior officers were accused of cutting deals with drug traffickers. All 553 members of the Morelos state ministerial police force were suspended pending investigation, their weapons taken away and their offices placed under guard, officials said. Morelos Gov.
WORLD
March 24, 2009 | Ken Ellingwood
Nab a drug lord, earn $2 million. That's how much Mexican authorities offered Monday for information leading to the capture of the country's most wanted drug suspects. The government offered rewards of 30 million pesos, about $2 million, each for 24 wanted figures, including Joaquin "Shorty" Guzman and Ismael Zambada, leaders of the main trafficking gang in the northwestern state of Sinaloa. Authorities offered $1-million rewards for 13 lower-ranking suspects.
WORLD
May 28, 2002 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Soldiers on Sunday captured Albino Quintero Meraz, described as a major drug trafficker aligned with Mexico's so-called Juarez cartel who claimed to have shipped as much as a ton and a half of cocaine each month from Guatemala to the United States. At a joint news conference Monday, Defense Secretary Ricardo Vega Garcia and Atty. Gen.
NEWS
December 21, 2001 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One of Mexico's most wanted drug trade suspects was arrested in Sinaloa state Thursday, one of the biggest apprehensions yet in President Vicente Fox's campaign to crack down on narcotics trafficking. Miguel Caro Quintero is the alleged boss of the so-called Sonora drug gang, one of the four largest cocaine- and marijuana-smuggling operations along the U.S.-Mexican border. Arrested in Los Mochis along Sinaloa's coast, he will be extradited to the United States, Mexican officials said.
NEWS
September 15, 2000 | CLAUDIA KOLKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federal officials on Thursday charged the alleged leader of a powerful Mexican drug cartel in the killing of a Mexican police official and nine other people, many of whose bodies were unearthed last year in a massive excavation along the U.S.-Mexico border. Authorities describe Vicente Carrillo Fuentes as overlord of the Ciudad Juarez, Mexico, drug cartel and allege he orchestrated the slayings to prevent informants from aiding drug agents.
NATIONAL
April 5, 2010 | By Richard A. Serrano
Authorities think he had his fingertips altered to disguise his prints and plastic surgery to mask his face. Except for his dark eyes, federal officials doubt he looks anything like his 12-year-old FBI most wanted photo -- round face, trim mustache and a scar along his cheek. Eduardo Ravelo, known on the street as "Tablas," or "lumber," for his ability to crush, allegedly rules thousands of acolytes in an operation that authorities say specializes in killing, conspiracy, extortion, drug trafficking and money laundering.
WORLD
January 6, 2005 | Chris Kraul, Times Staff Writer
The New Year's Eve slaying of a narco-trafficker's brother in Mexico's highest-security prison resulted Wednesday in the detention of the prison warden and renewed criticism of the government's seeming inability to curb the power and reach of the nation's deadly drug cartels. Arturo Guzman Loera, brother of Sinaloa-based drug lord Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman, was shot seven times by an assassin in an area of La Palma prison set aside for inmates to talk with their attorneys.
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