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Vicente Fox

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 5, 2000
Re "Mexico's Ruling Party Loses Presidency in Historic Election," July 3: Mexico is free at last! I wish that my father, a native of Mexico, had lived to see the PRI booted from power. He would have been so proud of his fellow countrymen. This Fourth of July, as I recall and honor the sacrifices of our American forefathers, I will also toast Vicente Fox and wish him and our neighbors in Mexico success in their quest to establish true freedom fully for the first time. ART PEDROZA JR. Santa Ana Time will tell if this former Coca-Cola executive is the "real thing."
ARTICLES BY DATE
WORLD
September 2, 2013 | By Richard Fausset
SAN CRISTOBAL, Mexico - Former President Vicente Fox grew up on a farm here in rural Guanajuato, one of Mexico's most conservative states. He is the kind of guy who wears big belt buckles, collects hand-tooled saddles and worships the free market. Ask him about his experience with the drug culture and the big man with the cowboy-movie mustache exhibits a kind of straight-laced pique: Never smoked pot, he says. Hardly knew anyone who did. But Fox has always fancied himself a policy maverick.
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OPINION
April 29, 2013 | By Vicente Fox
Throughout 2001, President George W. Bush and I spent time negotiating an important bilateral agreement on immigration policies and programs. We optimistically pieced together an innovative framework, and were close to reaching our goals, when the terrorist attacks on Sept. 11 derailed our plans. Now, in 2013, and in remarkably similar circumstances, President Obama and a bipartisan group of congressional leaders are again working courageously on immigration issues. I join the millions of voices echoing around the world in expressing my outrage and sorrow about the events in Boston this month.
WORLD
June 6, 2013 | By Tracy Wilkinson
MEXICO CITY -- Vicente Fox, the former president of Mexico, was one of the earliest and most prominent voices in favor of legalizing marijuana here. Now he says he would also become a grower. Fox, who is known for provocative statements, argues that legalizing and regulating marijuana production would deprive violent drug traffickers of their profits. And then legitimate growers would naturally take over production, he says. “I am a farmer,” Fox told reporters this week at his Fox Center in central Mexico's Guanajuato state.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 2007 | Reed Johnson, Times Staff Writer
HERE'S some unsolicited advice for Mexico's former president Vicente Fox: When you write an autobiography in which you lambaste your political predecessors as "kleptopresidents" -- i.e., thieving fat cats who gorged themselves silly at the public trough -- it's best not to publish it shortly after appearing with your wife in a magazine photo spread featuring your lavish, multimillion-dollar ranch estate.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 29, 2000
The Mexican people voted last July for radical change, and they'll get it starting Friday with the presidential inauguration of Vicente Fox, the man who ended 71 years of one-party rule by the Institutional Revolutionary Party. The list of challenges facing Fox is long and urgent, and the president-elect and his National Action Party will travel a hard road in seeking to change the face of Mexican politics and the prospects of the people.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 10, 2000 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL and JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
America finally welcomed a president-elect Thursday night--one who sports a mustache and wears size 12 cowboy boots. Vicente Fox, elected president of Mexico on July 2, flew in to address a Los Angeles banquet of the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund and to meet with Gov. Gray Davis.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 2, 2001 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On her first day on the job, Martha Irene Lara seemed effervescent. "This is your home," she repeatedly told assembled reporters in her initial news conference as Mexico's consul general in Los Angeles. Her welcoming style, while at odds with the traditionally stiff demeanor of Mexican officials, is indicative of the changed political reality in Mexico, where a new president eschews the studied formality of his predecessors.
NEWS
May 9, 2000 | MARY BETH SHERIDAN and JOCELYN Y. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In an unprecedented move, a top candidate in Mexico's presidential race transported his campaign Monday to the California Senate, pledging to preside over a peaceful democratic transition and urging the Mexican community to pour more resources into their homeland. The speech by Vicente Fox reflected how Mexican politicians increasingly are courting both the state's government and its residents of Mexican heritage.
WORLD
July 6, 2003 | Richard Boudreaux, Times Staff Writer
Vicente Fox is not on the ballot in today's nationwide elections. But the hero of Mexico's breakthrough to multiparty rule is campaigning, midway through a disappointing term, to redefine his presidency. It has been three years since the big-talking rancher and former Coca-Cola executive broke the Institutional Revolutionary Party's seven-decade monopoly on the office, raising high hopes for change in a nation held back by poverty and crime.
OPINION
April 29, 2013 | By Vicente Fox
Throughout 2001, President George W. Bush and I spent time negotiating an important bilateral agreement on immigration policies and programs. We optimistically pieced together an innovative framework, and were close to reaching our goals, when the terrorist attacks on Sept. 11 derailed our plans. Now, in 2013, and in remarkably similar circumstances, President Obama and a bipartisan group of congressional leaders are again working courageously on immigration issues. I join the millions of voices echoing around the world in expressing my outrage and sorrow about the events in Boston this month.
WORLD
September 23, 2010 | By Ken Ellingwood, Los Angeles Times
The floats danced with whimsy. The fireworks wowed. The light show rocked. But a week after Mexico's bicentennial bash, inquiring minds have obsessed on another spectacle: Who was the really tall guy built of steel and off-white plastic? And (since this is conspiracy-minded Mexico), is the government concealing his real identity? The giant's name is El Coloso, or Colossus, a 60-foot-tall, square-jawed figure assembled by creators Jorge Vargas and Juan Carlos Canfield for Independence Day festivities.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 24, 2010 | By Victoria Kim
When several Beverly Hills investors told stories of being conned by a suave, heavy-set man who claimed to be former Mexican President Vicente Fox's brother in media reports a few years ago, a sternly-worded notice appeared on the man's website. "Just as power abhors a vacuum, modern journalism apparently abhors any type of due diligence and fact checking before scurrilous allegations are repeated as fact," said the notice posted on the "official site" of Alfredo Trujillo Fox, threatening legal action against his accusers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 2, 2010 | Patrick J. McDonnell
A suspected financial swindler who allegedly boasted he was the brother of former Mexican President Vicente Fox pleaded not guilty Monday to charges of stealing more than $600,000 through bogus investment plans, according to the Los Angeles County district attorney's office. Alfredo Trujillo Fox, 66, was arrested Saturday on a felony complaint and was being held in lieu of $1-million bail, said Jane Robison, a spokeswoman for the district attorney's office. He was arraigned Monday on 15 counts of grand theft, 15 counts of unqualified sales of securities, 15 counts of misrepresentation in sales of securities and two counts of tax evasion.
WORLD
October 14, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
Opposition protesters egged and then tore down a bronze statue of former Mexican President Vicente Fox just hours after it was erected. Workers put up the commemorative statue before dawn in the city of Boca del Rio, in Veracruz state. But about 100 protesters surrounded the figure about 9 a.m. The crowd launched eggs at the statue, fastened a rope around its neck and pulled it to the ground.
WORLD
October 12, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
Mexico's lower house of Congress will investigate former President Vicente Fox for suspected corruption after setting up a commission to learn how he turned his ranch into a swanky country estate. Fox, whose term ended in 2006, raised suspicions after a magazine last month published photos of his refurbished property with a pool, peacocks and immaculate grounds.
NEWS
October 11, 2007
Upon assuming the Mexican presidency in 2000, Vicente Fox ended the one-party rule that had dominated the country for nearly 80 years. He worked his way to office from humble beginnings and served through 2006. Vroman's Bookstore and Caltech have invited the former leader to discuss and read from his new book, "Revolution of Hope."
WORLD
October 9, 2007 | Hector Tobar, Times Staff Writer
Vicente Fox, the former president of Mexico, wants his fellow citizens to know that he'll never abandon his beloved rancho in central Mexico, which his opponents and the media have attacked as a gaudy display of opulence rarely seen in a country racked by poverty. Currently on a tour of the United States to promote his autobiography "Revolution of Hope," Fox is under fire at home for the wealth he appears to have accumulated during his six years as president.
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