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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 10, 1988
I could not believe the article in The Times (Part I, May 23) about cyanide heap-leach mining. It appears that the land will be poisoned and scarred to extract a few pounds of gold. An officer of Viceroy Resource Corp. defended the despoliation by saying that it will increase the gross national product. Big deal! If I poison you and you require medical attention as a result, your medical costs also increase the gross national product. Does that justify my poisoning you? Does life count anymore?
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NEWS
March 20, 1992 | GLENN F. BUNTING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mining industry officials thought the president of Viceroy Resource Corp. had lost his mind last year when he committed to $4.4 million in environmental concessions before extracting a speck of gold from the company's Castle Mountain project here. In an unprecedented accord with the environmental community, D. Ross Fitzpatrick agreed to restore the 2,800-acre site after mining it and spend $1.3 million to protect the threatened desert tortoise.
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NEWS
March 20, 1992 | GLENN F. BUNTING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mining industry officials thought the president of Viceroy Resource Corp. had lost his mind last year when he committed to $4.4 million in environmental concessions before extracting a speck of gold from the company's Castle Mountain project here. In an unprecedented accord with the environmental community, D. Ross Fitzpatrick agreed to restore the 2,800-acre site after mining it and spend $1.3 million to protect the threatened desert tortoise.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 10, 1988
I could not believe the article in The Times (Part I, May 23) about cyanide heap-leach mining. It appears that the land will be poisoned and scarred to extract a few pounds of gold. An officer of Viceroy Resource Corp. defended the despoliation by saying that it will increase the gross national product. Big deal! If I poison you and you require medical attention as a result, your medical costs also increase the gross national product. Does that justify my poisoning you? Does life count anymore?
NEWS
November 11, 1990 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federal officials will allow a controversial gold mine to open in a sensitive area of the eastern Mojave Desert next year, but the project's operator has agreed to comply with a set of environmental conditions described as unprecedented in the booming gold mining industry. Under a plan approved by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management, Viceroy Gold Corp. of Las Vegas will operate a so-called "heap leach" mine in the Castle Mountains, a rugged range 100 miles east of Barstow.
NEWS
April 18, 1989 | LARRY B. STAMMER, Times Environmental Writer
Declaring that thousands of birds and animals are being poisoned, Rep. Mel Levine (D-Santa Monica) and the Wilderness Society called Monday for a federal investigation into gold mining operations in California and Nevada that use cyanide to extract the precious metal. More than 6,400 migratory birds and other animals, including deer, coyotes, kit foxes, rabbits and chipmunks, have been killed at the Nevada mines since 1984, according to figures compiled by Nevada officials and released at a press conference Monday at the Federal Building in Westwood.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 1992 | DAVID FOSTER, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Miners and environmentalists agreeing? That's hard to imagine these days in the West, where the two rival groups are clashing over public lands amid the biggest gold rush in U.S. history. Yet on a cactus-studded mountainside near the Nevada border, miners and environmentalists have come to an unusual, if uneasy, truce. The Castle Mountain open-pit gold mine--a venture of the British Columbia-based Viceroy Resource Corp.
NEWS
January 21, 1993 | GLENN F. BUNTING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Moving quickly to unveil her first piece of legislation, Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) is expected to introduce a controversial proposal today that would preserve 7 million acres of the vast California desert. A nearly identical bill, drafted by former Sen. Alan Cranston, was bottled up for six years by California Republicans, who contended that the legislation would cost hundreds of jobs and seal off much of the desert from mining, dirt bikes and recreational use.
NEWS
May 23, 1988 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, Times Staff Writer
Plans by a group of Canadian investors to use a controversial gold-mining technology at a site within the proposed Mojave National Park have come under attack by environmentalists, who claim that it will dry up a perennial spring and attract wildlife to ponds of cyanide-laced water.
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