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ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 2012 | By David C. Nichols
Resolute craft drives the cautionary content of “Incident at Vichy” at the Sierra Madre Playhouse. Arthur Miller's 1964 study of detainees in Nazi-occupied France isn't exactly top tier, but when executed as intensely as this gripping revival, it might as well be. The setting, well designed by director Barbara Schofield and Don Bergmann, recalls Sartre's “No Exit” by way of many a B-movie. In a stark anteroom, located somewhere in the officially free zone, a group of archetypes await questioning.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 2012 | By Robert Abele
An account of collaborationist Paris' World War II capture of more than 13,000 French Jews for deportation, Rose Boche's film "La Rafle" (The Roundup) aims for historical drama both procedural and soapy, with mixed results. France's shameful effort to appease the Nazis is told mostly from the perspective of a young Jewish boy (Hugo Leverdez) named Jo, who is based on the accounts of a real-life survivor. Jo's family ignores the warning signs until the dead-of-night gendarme raids, the planning of which by indifferent Vichy officials Boche occasionally shows with particularly wound-opening contempt.
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WORLD
July 27, 2012 | By Devorah Lauter, Los Angeles Times
PARIS - Some letters are decorated around the edges with flowers in colored pencil and crayon, the way little girls will do. But the words are about living in fear, and waiting for loved ones arrested because they were Jewish. "Dear Sir … I'm calling upon your generous soul and your good heart.... I think I've fallen into desperation.... I am alone and there's no one who can help us," 12-year-old Rosette Lewenstadt carefully wrote in blue ink 70 years ago from the Drancy internment camp, north of Paris.
WORLD
July 27, 2012 | By Devorah Lauter, Los Angeles Times
PARIS - Some letters are decorated around the edges with flowers in colored pencil and crayon, the way little girls will do. But the words are about living in fear, and waiting for loved ones arrested because they were Jewish. "Dear Sir … I'm calling upon your generous soul and your good heart.... I think I've fallen into desperation.... I am alone and there's no one who can help us," 12-year-old Rosette Lewenstadt carefully wrote in blue ink 70 years ago from the Drancy internment camp, north of Paris.
WORLD
February 17, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
France's top judicial body formally recognized the nation's role in deporting Jews to Nazi death camps during the Holocaust but in effect ruled out further reparations for the deportees or their families. Jewish groups welcomed the Council of State ruling. Nearly 70 years ago, the Vichy government helped deport about 76,000 people, including 11,000 children, from Nazi-occupied France to concentration camps. Fewer than 3,000 returned alive.
OPINION
December 6, 2008
Re " 'Mexican Schindler' honored," Dec.1 How refreshing to read about the Mexican diplomat Gilberto Bosques Saldivar, one of the many diplomats who saved Jews during World War II. The International Raoul Wallenberg Foundation had the privilege of honoring Bosques in 2005 as well as his Brazilian colleague, Luiz Martins de Souza Dantas, who also saved many lives in wartime France. We currently are conducting research on the actions of Turkish diplomats who served in France and Vichy, such as Ambassador Behic Erkin and Vice Consul Necdet Kent.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 2010 | By Richard Eder, Special to the Los Angeles Times
And The Show Went On Cultural Life in Nazi-Occupied Paris Alan Riding Alfred A. Knopf: 400 pp., $28.95 A lot has been written about the political, social and moral aspects of France under German occupation in World War II. Alan Riding, the former longtime New York Times cultural correspondent in Europe, now provides an arresting and detailed account of the French arts scene at the time. "And The Show Went On" is a big story and insidiously troubling. Big because, in 1940, France was the world's art capital; unquestionably in painting, and to a large extent in film, music and literature.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 6, 1985
Any informed person would have to laugh at White's obvious parroting of standard British lines about Northern Ireland. Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher has not been "studying the Ulster problem for most of her six years"; she has been studiously ignoring it, dumping ministers there who were out of favor. The only reason she agreed to even the symbolic "concessions" of the new treaty was because of the threat that more fervent nationalists would gain power. The Fine Gael and Social Democratic and Labor Party leaders were trying to shore up their nationalist credentials in a way that was painless--they were not wiling to follow stronger policies such as boycotts, peaceful direct actions, etc. Nor did they show great concern over such things as the repeal of the Flag and Emblems Act until Sinn Fein and Fianna Fail began gaining more ground in elections.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 2012 | By Robert Abele
An account of collaborationist Paris' World War II capture of more than 13,000 French Jews for deportation, Rose Boche's film "La Rafle" (The Roundup) aims for historical drama both procedural and soapy, with mixed results. France's shameful effort to appease the Nazis is told mostly from the perspective of a young Jewish boy (Hugo Leverdez) named Jo, who is based on the accounts of a real-life survivor. Jo's family ignores the warning signs until the dead-of-night gendarme raids, the planning of which by indifferent Vichy officials Boche occasionally shows with particularly wound-opening contempt.
WORLD
December 15, 2011 | By Kim Willsher, Los Angeles Times
Former French President Jacques Chirac was found guilty and received a two-year suspended sentence Thursday for misusing public funds and abusing public confidence while mayor of Paris. It is the first time a former French head of state has been convicted since Marshal Philippe Petain, leader of France's wartime Vichy regime, was found guilty of collaborating with the Nazis. The 79-year-old Chirac was not in court to hear the verdict, which came three months after his trial ended.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 2012 | By David C. Nichols
Resolute craft drives the cautionary content of “Incident at Vichy” at the Sierra Madre Playhouse. Arthur Miller's 1964 study of detainees in Nazi-occupied France isn't exactly top tier, but when executed as intensely as this gripping revival, it might as well be. The setting, well designed by director Barbara Schofield and Don Bergmann, recalls Sartre's “No Exit” by way of many a B-movie. In a stark anteroom, located somewhere in the officially free zone, a group of archetypes await questioning.
WORLD
May 3, 2012 | By Kim Willsher, Los Angeles Times
PARIS - It was billed as a political duel to the death. In the right corner, Nicolas Sarkozy, incumbent president seeking reelection but trailing badly in opinion polls. In the left, Socialist challenger Francois Hollande, favored to winFrance's presidential runoff Sunday but facing an aggressive rival with nothing to lose. The pair's only live television debate, it had been described by Sarkozy as "the moment of truth. " And, as possibly his last chance to turn his fortunes around, Sarkozy had vowed to "explode" his rival.
WORLD
December 15, 2011 | By Kim Willsher, Los Angeles Times
Former French President Jacques Chirac was found guilty and received a two-year suspended sentence Thursday for misusing public funds and abusing public confidence while mayor of Paris. It is the first time a former French head of state has been convicted since Marshal Philippe Petain, leader of France's wartime Vichy regime, was found guilty of collaborating with the Nazis. The 79-year-old Chirac was not in court to hear the verdict, which came three months after his trial ended.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 2010 | By Richard Eder, Special to the Los Angeles Times
And The Show Went On Cultural Life in Nazi-Occupied Paris Alan Riding Alfred A. Knopf: 400 pp., $28.95 A lot has been written about the political, social and moral aspects of France under German occupation in World War II. Alan Riding, the former longtime New York Times cultural correspondent in Europe, now provides an arresting and detailed account of the French arts scene at the time. "And The Show Went On" is a big story and insidiously troubling. Big because, in 1940, France was the world's art capital; unquestionably in painting, and to a large extent in film, music and literature.
WORLD
February 17, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
France's top judicial body formally recognized the nation's role in deporting Jews to Nazi death camps during the Holocaust but in effect ruled out further reparations for the deportees or their families. Jewish groups welcomed the Council of State ruling. Nearly 70 years ago, the Vichy government helped deport about 76,000 people, including 11,000 children, from Nazi-occupied France to concentration camps. Fewer than 3,000 returned alive.
OPINION
December 6, 2008
Re " 'Mexican Schindler' honored," Dec.1 How refreshing to read about the Mexican diplomat Gilberto Bosques Saldivar, one of the many diplomats who saved Jews during World War II. The International Raoul Wallenberg Foundation had the privilege of honoring Bosques in 2005 as well as his Brazilian colleague, Luiz Martins de Souza Dantas, who also saved many lives in wartime France. We currently are conducting research on the actions of Turkish diplomats who served in France and Vichy, such as Ambassador Behic Erkin and Vice Consul Necdet Kent.
WORLD
May 3, 2012 | By Kim Willsher, Los Angeles Times
PARIS - It was billed as a political duel to the death. In the right corner, Nicolas Sarkozy, incumbent president seeking reelection but trailing badly in opinion polls. In the left, Socialist challenger Francois Hollande, favored to winFrance's presidential runoff Sunday but facing an aggressive rival with nothing to lose. The pair's only live television debate, it had been described by Sarkozy as "the moment of truth. " And, as possibly his last chance to turn his fortunes around, Sarkozy had vowed to "explode" his rival.
NEWS
October 24, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
Maurice Papon, a former Cabinet minister on trial in Bordeaux for alleged World War II-era crimes against humanity, was hospitalized again, and the judge suspended the proceedings until Monday. Papon, 87, who underwent triple bypass heart surgery last year, was taken to a hospital in Pessac, near Bordeaux, reportedly suffering from bronchitis. On Wednesday, Papon told the BBC that he was being used as a scapegoat for the crimes of the pro-Nazi Vichy regime.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 18, 2007 | From Times Wire Services
Maurice Papon, a former Cabinet minister in France who was convicted of complicity in crimes against humanity for his role in deporting Jews during World War II and became a symbol of French collaboration with the Nazis, has died. He was 96. Papon, who underwent heart surgery at a clinic east of Paris last week, died in his sleep Saturday, said his lawyer, Francis Vuillemin. Papon was one of the the highest-ranking Frenchmen to be convicted for a role in the pro-Nazi Vichy regime.
BOOKS
March 21, 2004 | Barbara Probst Solomon, Barbara Probst Solomon is El Pais' U.S. cultural correspondent. Her books include her memoir "Arriving Where We Started," on which her documentary "When the War Was Over" is based. She is a professor at Sarah Lawrence College.
Though the Nazis continue to have a disquieting allure on our imagination, the French have never quite recovered from the profound humiliation of the German occupation; it has taken the country decades to open the Pandora's box of the Vichy years.
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