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Vicious Dogs

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 29, 2009 | From Times Staff Reports
Despite fierce criticism, Lancaster officials have unanimously adopted an ordinance that will impose stiff penalties on the owners of "potentially dangerous" and "vicious" dogs, particularly those that law enforcement officials say are favored by gang members to intimidate rivals and others. Under the new law, dogs that are unprovoked and engage in aggressive behavior, may be found to be "potentially dangerous."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 2013 | By Paloma Esquivel
Orange County won't be creating a Megan's Law-style website for dangerous dogs any time soon. The county Board of Supervisors had been considering creating an online database listing the addresses of homes where dangerous dogs are kept, but on Tuesday a majority of supervisors said they don't support such a site. “I think that whole area needs a lot more study before we go in that direction,” said Supervisor Patricia Bates. The website had been included in a proposed ordinance defining vicious and potentially dangerous dogs and outlining the county's recourses for dealing with them.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 2013 | By Jean Merl
In response to recent incidents involving vicious dogs roaming the Antelope Valley, Los Angeles County will increase staffing and equipment and add another call center to help curb the problem, officials said. The L.A. County Board of Supervisors approved nearly $775,000 for the project immediately and has earmarked an additional $2.4 million for approval soon, said Supervisor Mike Antonovich, who represents the area. The money was allocated in response to last month's fatal mauling of a Littlerock woman by a pack of pit bulls as she was taking an early morning walk near her home.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 4, 2013 | By Adolfo Flores
Orange County may soon have a Megan's Law-style website for dangerous dogs. The website probably would list the addresses of homes where dogs deemed to be dangerous or vicious are being kept, along with a description of each animal and how it got into trouble in the first place. "We know where dangerous sex offenders are living in our community," county Supervisor Todd Spitzer said. "The public has the right to know where owners are harboring a dog declared vicious or dangerous.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 2013 | By Paloma Esquivel
Orange County won't be creating a Megan's Law-style website for dangerous dogs any time soon. The county Board of Supervisors had been considering creating an online database listing the addresses of homes where dangerous dogs are kept, but on Tuesday a majority of supervisors said they don't support such a site. “I think that whole area needs a lot more study before we go in that direction,” said Supervisor Patricia Bates. The website had been included in a proposed ordinance defining vicious and potentially dangerous dogs and outlining the county's recourses for dealing with them.
NEWS
January 28, 1988
After an hour of sometimes-heated debate, the Long Beach City Council on Tuesday night decided it needs more time to study a law that would make owners of vicious dogs liable for the actions of their pets. Some council members thought the six-part proposal too lax; others thought it too stringent. So the council sent the proposed ordinance back to its three-member legislation committee, which last week recommended that dog owners be held criminally liable for vicious dogs.
NEWS
March 3, 1988 | ROXANA KOPETMAN
Owners of vicious dogs can be held liable for their pets' actions and the dogs can be destroyed after a formal hearing, the Long Beach City Council agreed this week. That means that impounded dogs that have not bitten anyone but show signs of viciousness can be subject to a hearing by the superintendent of animal control, who may rule that the animal must be destroyed. Currently, a dog would be destroyed usually only after it has bitten a person.
NEWS
June 7, 1988 | CARL INGRAM, Times Staff Writer
The Senate on Monday passed heavily amended legislation to crack down harder on both vicious and "potentially dangerous" dogs and to require their masters to carry $100,000 in liability insurance. In a display of pre-Election Day action, the Senate also approved a $2-million bill to finance AIDS prevention education in grades seven through 12 and a proposal to exempt from public records information on why a person was issued a permit to carry a concealed gun. The vicious-dog bill by Sen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 22, 1999
After shooting 98 dogs to death in the last two years, the Los Angeles Police Department is launching a training program to help officers handle vicious animals. Officers in West Los Angeles will undergo training by city animal control experts as part of an effort to reduce the number of dogs killed each year, said Dan Knapp, general manager of the Animal Regulation Department. "I think that will help [police] respond with less deadly force," Knapp said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 8, 1987 | TED VOLLMER, Times Staff Writer
Reacting to growing concern over dangerous canines, particularly pit bull terriers, two Los Angeles County supervisors Tuesday proposed laws to crack down on vicious dogs and their owners. In a sweeping proposal, Supervisor Kenneth Hahn urged an outright ban on pit bulls in the county's unincorporated areas and in cities that contract with the county for animal control services.
NEWS
September 25, 2013 | By Carla Hall
There was another troubling and tragic story this week of pit bulls killing someone in Southern California. In this case, it was a 2-year-old in Colton who slipped into the backyard of his grandmother's home where her five pit bull mixes were kept. Samuel Zamudio's clothes had been torn off when his 42-year-old grandmother, Eustalia Zamudio, found him in the backyard. He was rushed to a hospital, where he was pronounced dead. The death of the toddler follows a fatal mauling last May of a jogger who was attacked on a street in the Antelope Valley community of Littlerock by several pit bulls that got out of their home.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 2013 | By Joseph Serna
Five pit bull mixes that mauled a 2-year-old boy to death in Colton have been euthanized, police said Wednesday. The five dogs were taken by authorities after the mangled body of toddler Samuel Zamudio was discovered in the backyard of a home on Citrus Avenue on Monday afternoon. A friend of the family said that the boy had climbed out of a rear window into the backyard when no one was looking, and by the time he was found 30 minutes later, it was too late. A necropsy on the dogs will be performed Wednesday for evidence, said Colton police Det. Ray Mendez.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 2013 | By Joseph Serna and Kate Mather
An uncle and grandmother of a 2-year-old boy mauled to death by a group of pit bull-mix dogs in Colton could eventually be charged with murder, police said Tuesday. Marco Zamudio, 23, and Eustulia Zamudio, 42, were arrested on suspicion of child endangerment resulting in death hours after 2-year-old Samuel Zamudio, of Rialto, was attacked Monday afternoon in a backyard in Colton by five dogs, described as pit bull mixes. Marco was responsible for taking care of his nephew at the time, said Colton police Det. Ray Mendez. Eustulia was the homeowner and the dogs belonged to her, he said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 2013 | By Jean Merl
In response to recent incidents involving vicious dogs roaming the Antelope Valley, Los Angeles County will increase staffing and equipment and add another call center to help curb the problem, officials said. The L.A. County Board of Supervisors approved nearly $775,000 for the project immediately and has earmarked an additional $2.4 million for approval soon, said Supervisor Mike Antonovich, who represents the area. The money was allocated in response to last month's fatal mauling of a Littlerock woman by a pack of pit bulls as she was taking an early morning walk near her home.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 1, 2013 | Kate Mather, Abby Sewell and Matt Stevens
Littlerock is one of those small Antelope Valley towns that melt into the desert, a place of few people but many dogs. Houses surrounded by chain-link fences bear "no trespassing" and "beware of dog" signs. A chorus of barks and growls greets passersby. Numerous strays also roam the desert. Residents say Littlerock has become a dumping ground for unwanted dogs. "A car will come down the street at 40 mph, slow down and a door will open," said longtime resident David Cleveland.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 30, 2013 | By Samantha Schaefer and Richard Winton
The husband of a woman who was fatally mauled by a pack of pit bulls said he is haunted by the "brutality" of the attack and hopes the murder charge sends a message to owners of vicious dogs. “There's no way I can get the brutality of this out of my head," said Ben Devitt, 65. "And the fact that there's animals out there roaming around with that kind of killer instinct, it's just kind of something I can't shake.” Devitt said he lives three blocks from Alex Johnson, 29, who was charged with murder in the May 9 attack that killed Pamela Devitt, his wife of 43 years.
NEWS
May 16, 2013 | By Carla Hall
The fatal attack on a woman walking in the Antelope Valley community of Littlerock by four pit bulls last week has prompted Los Angeles County Supervisor Michael D. Antonovich to ask the  county Department of Animal Care and Control to look into ways to better deal with the problem of vicious dogs prowling the streets. Roaming dogs in general are a problem in the Antelope Valley, where the landscape seems to invite careless or even cruel behavior. “People go out there and abandon their dogs in the desert,” Marcia Mayeda, the director of Animal Care and Control, told me. “They abandon horses too. We find them - skin and bones.” People also sometimes let their dogs run loose, thinking that's fine in a rather rural area.
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