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NEWS
May 4, 1995 | CHRISTINA V. GODBEY
You won't find Vicki Juditz's name on a movie theater marquee or in a local guidebook, but the Pennsylvania native has established herself as an insightful storyteller who honors her own experiences and the experiences of others. Her performances are anything but routine, featuring spirited and witty dialogue. On Wednesday evening, you can catch Juditz, who has devoted the last seven years to writing and performing, when she debuts "L.A. Stories" at Borders Books and Music in Westwood.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 2002 | F. Kathleen Foley
Self-proclaimed storyteller Vicki Juditz is a diffident woman with a girlish voice and understated manner. She spends the bulk of "Where Do Babies Come From?"--her solo show at the Elephant Theater--seated in a chair, facing the audience, her hands clasped in her lap. For Juditz, less is more. Under the direction of Alan Kirschenbaum, Juditz is a study in stage minimalism, letting words work for her, without flash or artifice.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 1994 | F. KATHLEEN FOLEY
T eshuvah is a Hebrew term meaning roughly "a return to the fold." For Vicki Juditz, a Gentile woman who has converted to Judaism, the "return" was circuitous but predestined. Juditz believes that her very Jewish last name indicates that her forbears were once Jewish, and that her own present-day conversion is quite literally a "return" to the faith of her ancestors.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 16, 2001 | RICHARD KAHLENBERG, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Vicki Juditz is a Pennsylvania native who married into a Catskills theatrical dynasty. After a television career in New York City she moved to Los Angeles, where local theater critics wrote that she is a "natural storyteller." Cheryl Montelle left St. Louis as a teenager for a dance career on Broadway. Then she moved to Los Angeles, where she took up motherhood and the art of storytelling.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 2002 | F. Kathleen Foley
Self-proclaimed storyteller Vicki Juditz is a diffident woman with a girlish voice and understated manner. She spends the bulk of "Where Do Babies Come From?"--her solo show at the Elephant Theater--seated in a chair, facing the audience, her hands clasped in her lap. For Juditz, less is more. Under the direction of Alan Kirschenbaum, Juditz is a study in stage minimalism, letting words work for her, without flash or artifice.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 16, 2001 | RICHARD KAHLENBERG, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Vicki Juditz is a Pennsylvania native who married into a Catskills theatrical dynasty. After a television career in New York City she moved to Los Angeles, where local theater critics wrote that she is a "natural storyteller." Cheryl Montelle left St. Louis as a teenager for a dance career on Broadway. Then she moved to Los Angeles, where she took up motherhood and the art of storytelling.
NEWS
March 13, 2002
Ticket price--Tickets to "On a Humorous Note: Vicki Juditz," a performance at the Beverly Hills Public Library on Thursday, are $5. A higher ticket price was given in Sunday Calendar's theater listings.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 1997
Jan Breslauer refers to Josh Kornbluth's "one previous performance in Los Angeles, in 1991" ("It All Adds Up Now," Aug. 17). In fact, there were 16 performances, which I produced, and they were critically very successful. Over the years I've attended dozens of solo shows, and Kornbluth's monologues are exceptional. There are a handful of solo artists, including Los Angeles-based monologuists Vicki Juditz, Barry Neikrug and Sandra Tsing Loh who, like Kornbluth, are able to mold their idiosyncratic and often quite shattering experiences into life lessons--where the audience walks away transformed and having been thoroughly entertained in the process.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 1996
Three playwrights' labs will be presented by the Audrey Skirball-Kenis Theatre, beginning with "Timeless Plays for a Timely Repertoire," led by Cornerstone playwright and director Alison Carey, on Sept. 28 from 2:30 to 5:30 p.m. "Telling It Like It Was," with storyteller Vicki Juditz, will be presented on Oct. 23, followed by "How to Take a Literary Department by Storm," a round-table led by playwright-director Theresa Chavez, on Nov. 12.
NEWS
May 4, 1995 | CHRISTINA V. GODBEY
You won't find Vicki Juditz's name on a movie theater marquee or in a local guidebook, but the Pennsylvania native has established herself as an insightful storyteller who honors her own experiences and the experiences of others. Her performances are anything but routine, featuring spirited and witty dialogue. On Wednesday evening, you can catch Juditz, who has devoted the last seven years to writing and performing, when she debuts "L.A. Stories" at Borders Books and Music in Westwood.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 1994 | F. KATHLEEN FOLEY
T eshuvah is a Hebrew term meaning roughly "a return to the fold." For Vicki Juditz, a Gentile woman who has converted to Judaism, the "return" was circuitous but predestined. Juditz believes that her very Jewish last name indicates that her forbears were once Jewish, and that her own present-day conversion is quite literally a "return" to the faith of her ancestors.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 30, 2012
Alan Kirschenbaum, 51, a television producer and comedy writer who worked on such shows as "Raising Hope," "My Name is Earl" and "Yes, Dear," which he co-created, was found dead Friday at his Burbank home. Early reports indicate he may have committed suicide, according to a spokesman for the Los Angeles County coroner's office. No other details were released. An autopsy is pending. CBS, where Kirschenbaum had a new show in production, said in a statement it was "stunned and devastated" by his death and called him "a gifted and successful" comedy writer and producer.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 1994 | SEAN MONIQUE FAUSTINA, TIME STAFF WRITER
"Tell me a story." Sometimes we just want to let our imagination switch into overdrive and, through the mind's eye, paint a picture with words. Interactive entertainment has acquired new meaning through one of the oldest forms of communication--storytelling, and no batteries are required. "Words, Wisdom and Wit" is the first of a series of live spoken-word concerts for and by adults to be presented tonight at 8 at the Beverly Hills Library.
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