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NEWS
September 30, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
A federal appeals court agreed to rehear arguments on whether the FBI sharpshooter who killed Randy Weaver's wife during the 1992 standoff at Ruby Ridge, Idaho, can be prosecuted on manslaughter charges. In June, a three-judge panel of the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that Idaho prosecutors could not hold Lon T. Horiuchi responsible for actions taken as a federal lawman. On a request from prosecutors, however, the 11-member court will rehear the case at an undetermined time.
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NEWS
June 6, 2001 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
An FBI sharpshooter can be prosecuted by the state of Idaho for the killing of white separatist Randy Weaver's wife during the 1992 siege at Ruby Ridge, a sharply divided federal appeals court in San Francisco ruled Tuesday. The 6-5 decision by the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals reversed two earlier rulings and held that sharpshooter Lon T. Horiuchi's status as a federal agent did not protect him from prosecution because he has not demonstrated that his actions were objectively reasonable.
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NEWS
November 1, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The FBI sharpshooter who killed Vicki Weaver during a standoff at a mountain cabin in Ruby Ridge, Idaho, five years ago sought to have the state's involuntary manslaughter case against him moved to federal court. The Justice Department supported Lon Horiuchi's bid in a separate filing to the U.S. District Court in Idaho. The 13-year FBI veteran is accused of criminal negligence for firing into the cabin, killing Weaver as she stood behind the door in August 1992.
NEWS
September 30, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
A federal appeals court agreed to rehear arguments on whether the FBI sharpshooter who killed Randy Weaver's wife during the 1992 standoff at Ruby Ridge, Idaho, can be prosecuted on manslaughter charges. In June, a three-judge panel of the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that Idaho prosecutors could not hold Lon T. Horiuchi responsible for actions taken as a federal lawman. On a request from prosecutors, however, the 11-member court will rehear the case at an undetermined time.
NEWS
May 19, 1996 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's almost impossible not to be aware of the anti-government militia movement in the United States. The "freemen" standoff in Montana and the Oklahoma City bombing trial have been in newspaper and TV headlines for months. And now one of the government's most controversial encounters with separatists is the subject of the four-hour CBS drama "Ruby Ridge: An American Tragedy."
NEWS
December 17, 1997 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Under stepped-up security in one of the nation's hotbeds of anti-government sentiment, FBI sniper Lon Horiuchi appeared in a courtroom here Tuesday to face charges that he illegally fired the precision rifle blast that killed the wife of white separatist Randy Weaver and triggered the end of the infamous siege at Ruby Ridge.
NEWS
June 6, 2001 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
An FBI sharpshooter can be prosecuted by the state of Idaho for the killing of white separatist Randy Weaver's wife during the 1992 siege at Ruby Ridge, a sharply divided federal appeals court in San Francisco ruled Tuesday. The 6-5 decision by the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals reversed two earlier rulings and held that sharpshooter Lon T. Horiuchi's status as a federal agent did not protect him from prosecution because he has not demonstrated that his actions were objectively reasonable.
NEWS
September 15, 1995 | RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
FBI snipers Thursday defended their actions at the 1992 Ruby Ridge, Ida., siege in which a member of their team killed an unarmed woman, contending that danger to an FBI observation helicopter from armed men outside the woman's cabin justified the shots that were fired. But skeptical senators questioned whether permissive shoot-to-kill orders and exaggerated information about the threat posed by Randy Weaver, the woman's husband, led to an overreaction. Dale R.
NEWS
September 13, 1995 | RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The FBI sniper who killed the wife of a white separatist in the siege at Ruby Ridge, Ida., in 1992 invoked his Fifth Amendment privilege Tuesday and refused to describe to a Senate subcommittee the circumstances of the crucial event. Sniper Lon Horiuchi took the Fifth Amendment after the Senate Judiciary subcommittee on terrorism refused to give him limited immunity from prosecution. Immunity for Horiuchi could have complicated criminal inquiries being conducted by the Boundary County, Ida.
NEWS
December 9, 1994 | From Associated Press
The Justice Department has decided not to bring criminal charges against the FBI sharpshooter who shot and killed the wife of white separatist Randy Weaver during a 1992 standoff in Idaho. Deval Patrick, head of the department's civil rights division, decided that there was no evidence that FBI agents willfully used excessive force, a law enforcement source said Thursday. The siege began Aug. 21, 1992, when U.S. marshals went to Weaver's mountain cabin to arrest him on a weapons charge.
NEWS
December 17, 1997 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Under stepped-up security in one of the nation's hotbeds of anti-government sentiment, FBI sniper Lon Horiuchi appeared in a courtroom here Tuesday to face charges that he illegally fired the precision rifle blast that killed the wife of white separatist Randy Weaver and triggered the end of the infamous siege at Ruby Ridge.
NEWS
November 1, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The FBI sharpshooter who killed Vicki Weaver during a standoff at a mountain cabin in Ruby Ridge, Idaho, five years ago sought to have the state's involuntary manslaughter case against him moved to federal court. The Justice Department supported Lon Horiuchi's bid in a separate filing to the U.S. District Court in Idaho. The 13-year FBI veteran is accused of criminal negligence for firing into the cabin, killing Weaver as she stood behind the door in August 1992.
NEWS
May 19, 1996 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's almost impossible not to be aware of the anti-government militia movement in the United States. The "freemen" standoff in Montana and the Oklahoma City bombing trial have been in newspaper and TV headlines for months. And now one of the government's most controversial encounters with separatists is the subject of the four-hour CBS drama "Ruby Ridge: An American Tragedy."
NEWS
September 15, 1995 | RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
FBI snipers Thursday defended their actions at the 1992 Ruby Ridge, Ida., siege in which a member of their team killed an unarmed woman, contending that danger to an FBI observation helicopter from armed men outside the woman's cabin justified the shots that were fired. But skeptical senators questioned whether permissive shoot-to-kill orders and exaggerated information about the threat posed by Randy Weaver, the woman's husband, led to an overreaction. Dale R.
NEWS
September 24, 2000 | From Associated Press
The federal government paid $380,000 Friday to Kevin Harris, who alleged his rights were violated when an FBI sniper wounded him during the 1992 Ruby Ridge siege. The Justice Department announced the settlement of the last remaining civil lawsuit arising from the weeklong standoff at the Idaho compound of white separatist Randy Weaver. The government did not admit any liability as it paid Harris to drop his $10-million suit.
NEWS
March 14, 1998 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Top law enforcement officials stepped up in defense of FBI sharpshooter Lon Horiuchi, arguing Friday that criminal manslaughter charges he faces in connection with the siege at Ruby Ridge threaten to undermine federal law enforcement efforts across the country. "It is impossible to imagine a more chilling circumstance than the one presented by the instant effort to prosecute," a coalition of former U.S. attorneys general, joining the Department of Justice and the International Assn.
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