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Vicky Chavez

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December 19, 1989 | MICHAEL QUINTANILLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For days now, Vicky Chavez--known to barrio residents as La Comadre , an affectionate term for godmother--has phoned, hunted and hounded countless people in Los Angeles for $800. The money is not for herself. It's for a Mexican family whose child was murdered in a drive-by shooting last month. The parents spent what little money they had on funeral costs. Since then, they and their surviving children have been without electricity, water, food, rent money--and hope.
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NEWS
December 19, 1989 | MICHAEL QUINTANILLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For days now, Vicky Chavez--known to barrio residents as La Comadre , an affectionate term for godmother--has phoned, hunted and hounded countless people in Los Angeles for $800. The money is not for herself. It's for a Mexican family whose child was murdered in a drive-by shooting last month. The parents spent what little money they had on funeral costs. Since then, they and their surviving children have been without electricity, water, food, rent money--and hope.
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NEWS
May 10, 1993
Vicky Chavez was devastated 13 years ago when her daughter was killed. Later, she says, "I realized I needed to work with victims of violence because everything I had done before this work just wasn't right." Today, as director for Proyecto Latino, she fights for the rights of Spanish-speaking victims of violent crime. "I am here because I understand their culture, their language, their needs. I've lived through it." Local Hero, E3
NEWS
December 6, 1990 | EDWARD J. BOYER
* "Proyecto Latino is going strong, I hate to say, because that means there are a lot of crime victims," said Vicky Chavez, director of the 4-year-old East Los Angeles counseling program. Chavez, whose daughter, Elaine, 21, was murdered in 1980, is a tireless advocate for Spanish-speaking crime victims, providing emotional support and helping them through the maze of courts, prosecutors, police and hospitals.
NEWS
May 2, 1987
Spanish-speaking crime victims now have a telephone hot line number they can call to seek assistance under a new program run by the nonprofit Crime Victim Center of Los Angeles, officials said at a press conference Friday. Bilingual volunteers presently staff the hot line (213-937-7753) from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m, Monday through Friday, but Vicky Chavez, director of the center's Latino Crime Victim Project, said she expects it to become a seven-day-a-week, 24-hour-a-day operation by June.
NEWS
May 10, 1993 | Michael Quintanilla, View Staff Writer
As director for Proyecto Latino, Vicky Chavez fights for the rights of Spanish-speaking victims of violent crime. In a small office at El Centro Mental Health and Human Services Corp. in East Los Angeles, the 59-year-old grandmother runs the state-funded project by herself. Chavez answers calls from victims seeking financial, medical and legal information. Often she counsels victims and survivors in their homes. She understands their plight .
NEWS
August 25, 1992 | MICHAEL QUINTANILLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Over and over, Roberto Hernandez's mother recalls the day her son left home: He tosses a small canvas bag over his broad shoulders and heads down a dusty Mexican road to catch a bus. Destination: California. Before he left, "I said to him, 'God Bless you, mijo (my son),' " says Socorro Lopez. "He hugged me so tightly." Roberto eschewed a tearful farewell. " 'Mama, stay here at the door. Don't go out into the street. I can't bear to see you cry.'
NEWS
January 23, 1991 | PAUL DEAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It concentrates the mind wonderfully, wrote Samuel Johnson, when a man knows he is to be hanged in a fortnight. Or, he might have added, when a country collides with war. For when a nation bleeds it is changed forever. Usual thoughts of more ordinary days seem vacant, even silly before news that is fresh, grim and awful. The images of war persist, then become indelible: Of . . . sad, dazed faces of soldiers beaten into meaningless confession.
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