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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 1999 | DANIEL YI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Kevin Green, a Tustin man who was wrongly convicted of raping his pregnant wife and causing the death of their unborn daughter 20 years ago, on Tuesday settled a wrongful-death lawsuit filed by his ex-wife, who continued to hold him partially responsible for the crime. The settlement brings closure to a two-decade-long legal ordeal for Green, who was set free in 1996 after authorities linked the crime to another man.
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NATIONAL
September 21, 2012 | By Michael Muskal
Kenneth Feinberg, who oversaw victim compensation funds after the Virginia Tech shootings, the BP oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico and to those connected to the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, is being asked to become involved in the money collected after a shooting at a movie theater in Aurora, Colo. The shooting prompted more than $5 million in donations. Feinberg, who was hired this week to deal with compensation claims stemming from the Jerry Sandusky child sex-abuse scandal at Penn State, will meet on Friday with Colorado state and charity officials to discuss a role in resolving disputes, it was reported by a variety of media outlets.
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BUSINESS
November 20, 1990 | SCOT J. PALTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Manville Corp. has agreed to make additional payments of as much as $520 million over seven years to the trust set up to benefit asbestos victims. A comprehensive settlement disclosed Monday also will revamp the way claims are paid, giving priority to the most gravely ill. The plan is meant to settle about 150,000 pending claims by people injured by Manville-produced asbestos.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 2008 | Patrick McGreevy, McGreevy is a Times staff writer.
Crime victims in California are getting less financial help from a state victim compensation fund, and too much is spent on administering the program, according to a state audit released Tuesday. The amount of victim compensation payments fell from $123.9 million in the 2001-02 fiscal year to $61.6 million four years later -- a 50% decline. The payments last year were $81.2 million, still below the amount paid seven years ago, according to California Auditor Elaine Howle's report.
NEWS
August 5, 1988 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, Times Staff Writer
In a strong bipartisan signal, House Armed Services Committee members warned the Reagan Administration on Thursday that it faces stiff obstacles in selling Congress on the idea of compensating families of the victims of last month's downing of an Iranian airliner.
BUSINESS
February 1, 1998 | MYRON LEVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Traditional alliances are taking a beating in the smoking wars. Filial piety is too. Consider the latest assault on Big Tobacco--a multibillion-dollar suit against cigarette makers by the Manville Personal Injury Settlement Trust. The trust, which was spawned by the 1982 bankruptcy of asbestos giant Johns Manville Corp., compensates workers for the asbestos-related diseases that drove Manville to seek bankruptcy protection.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 1994 | DAVAN MAHARAJ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An Orange County Superior Court judge ruled Wednesday that an evangelical preacher had conned an heiress out of nearly $500,000 and ordered him to repay the money plus $250,000 in punitive damages. Mel Tari, 48, of Dana Point, an evangelist and author of several Christian books, must repay Christine Kline, 41, of Denver for the small fortune she signed over to him. Kline, who had inherited Capital Printing Co.
BUSINESS
November 30, 1998 | MICHAEL DOBBS, THE WASHINGTON POST
Three years after Swiss banks became the target of a worldwide furor over their business dealings with Nazi Germany, major American car companies find themselves embroiled in a similar debate. Like the Swiss banks, the U.S. car companies have vigorously denied that they assisted the Nazi war machine or significantly profited from the use of forced labor at their German subsidiaries during World War II.
SPORTS
January 31, 1989 | ELLIOTT ALMOND, Times Staff Writer
Bruce Kimball, a 1984 Olympic silver medalist in diving, Monday was sentenced to 17 years in prison and 15 years' probation for a drunk-driving accident that killed two teen-agers and injured four last August in Brandon, Fla., a suburb of Tampa.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 2008 | Patrick McGreevy, McGreevy is a Times staff writer.
Crime victims in California are getting less financial help from a state victim compensation fund, and too much is spent on administering the program, according to a state audit released Tuesday. The amount of victim compensation payments fell from $123.9 million in the 2001-02 fiscal year to $61.6 million four years later -- a 50% decline. The payments last year were $81.2 million, still below the amount paid seven years ago, according to California Auditor Elaine Howle's report.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 20, 2008 | Joanna Lin, Lin is a Times staff writer.
The Los Angeles City Council on Wednesday awarded $2.25 million to a police officer who said she was discriminated against and sexually harassed by her male colleagues and supervisors, and then retaliated against when she complained.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 2008 | From the Associated Press
A judge on Thursday ordered a family of British forgers who tricked a museum into buying a fake Egyptian statue to pay back more than $800,000 to institutions they defrauded. George Greenhalgh, 84; his wife, Olive, 83; and their son Shaun, 47, were convicted last year of selling forged artworks between 1989 and 2006. Their biggest sale was a fake Egyptian statue, bought by the Bolton Museum in northern England in 2003. A judge in London ordered the family to repay $723,000 to Bolton Borough Council and smaller sums to Sotheby's auction house and the Henry Moore Institute.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 12, 2008 | Jean-Paul Renaud
Supervisors on Tuesday awarded $975,000 to a man who alleges he suffered serious injuries after a bicycle accident on a county road. Poor signage and dangerous road conditions caused David LeBarron to fall off his bicycle into a catch basin on Crown Valley Road in the Antelope Valley in May 2004. He fractured his skull and suffered a severe concussion and hemorrhaging, according to a lawsuit filed in 2005. The settlement was proposed by a mediator.
WORLD
March 12, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
The Belgian government and banks announced that they would pay $170 million to Holocaust survivors, families of victims and the Jewish community for their material losses during Word War II. Overall, $54 million will be paid to individual claimants, with the rest going to a Jewish trust that will help the poor and keep the memory of the horrors of World War II alive. About half of the 50,000 Jews in Belgium died in the Holocaust. Belgian authorities will provide $69.8 million, and $85 million will come from banks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 2008 | Jean-Paul Renaud
The Board of Supervisors agreed Tuesday to pay a $437,000 settlement after doctors at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center removed a woman's uterus without her consent. Engrid Lewis was admitted to the public hospital in September 2006, suffering from fibroid tissue in her uterus, according to the settlement papers. Doctors gave her a range of options, including removal of her uterus. Lewis chose to have the affected tissue excised without removing her uterus. "While the county will argue that the proper medical treatment was to remove the patient's uterus, plaintiff will argue that the removal of her uterus was against her wishes," according to a case summary.
WORLD
January 17, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
A court convicted Total SA in France's worst oil spill and ordered the petroleum giant and three other defendants to pay $285 million in compensation. It was the first time a French court awarded damages for environmental harm. The ruling found Total guilty of maritime pollution for transporting fuel in a rusty tanker that broke apart in a 1999 storm and stained 250 miles of coast with oil. Compensation was ordered paid to 101 civil parties, mainly associations involved in the cleanup and ecology groups.
NATIONAL
October 8, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
A last-minute surge of more than 3,700 people could seek death or injury benefits before a Dec. 22 deadline for victims of the Sept. 11 terror attacks, Justice Department auditors say. But even with the new, larger estimate, the $5.1-billion Sept. 11 Victim Compensation Fund appears on track to have a $27-million surplus after paying all claims, according to an audit by the Justice Department's inspector general.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 2, 1992 | MACK REED
The Ventura County district attorney's office is seeking volunteers to provide help to crime victims. In a course beginning Jan. 20, the volunteers will be trained extensively in counseling skills, victim compensation and the criminal justice system. The training will prepare them for work with the district attorney's victim services division immediately after a crime to help assess victims' emotional, physical and financial needs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 16, 2008 | John Spano, Times Staff Writer
Robert Blake, the actor acquitted of his wife's murder, should not have to pay her survivors a $30-million civil court award because he did not get a fair trial, his lawyers told appellate judges Tuesday. "All we asked for was a fair trial, and it wasn't," M. Gerald Schwartzbach argued to the state 2nd District Court of Appeal in Los Angeles. "Celebrities have the same rights as anybody else. . . . Mr. Blake was denied that." Attorney Eric J.
BUSINESS
December 20, 2007 | From Times Wire Services
After waiting two years for their share of the $225-million restitution fund tied to a $2.2-billion accounting scandal, 88,444 CA Inc. shareholders were told this week that they had to return about 20% of their payment because of a math error. And 2,000 shareholders mistakenly got no money. The U.S. District Court in Brooklyn said return of the overpayments was mandatory. The $59.2-million error was the result of a mistake by a firm working for the court-appointed fund administrator.
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