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Victim Compensation

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 15, 2003 | Jenifer Warren, Times Staff Writer
California prison officials want to better serve crime victims by increasing the amount of restitution money the state collects from inmates, a plan welcomed by victims' families but one that drew an angry response from relatives of convicts at a public hearing Tuesday. About 96% of the state's 160,000 inmates pay some sort of court-ordered compensation, amounting to roughly $9 million in an average year.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 14, 2003 | Karen Alexander, Special to The Times
Rick Walker is used to waiting for the things he deserves. He spent 12 years in prison for a murder he didn't commit, until a judge ordered him released in June and declared his innocence. And he thought he was going to have to wait at least another four months for a $428,000 state compensation, when the Legislature appeared to have squashed its approval. But at about 2:30 a.m. Saturday, in what Rep.
NATIONAL
December 23, 2005 | Ryan G. Murphy, Times Staff Writer
On Sept. 11, 2001, family therapist Norma Steuerle was among the 59 victims aboard a plane that hijackers crashed into the Pentagon. But rather than seek revenge, her husband and daughters chose to create a charity to combat the conditions in which terrorism can thrive. Our Voices Together, which was started on the fourth anniversary of the attacks, supports programs to promote tolerance, social justice, education and economic development around the world.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 1, 2007 | Christopher Goffard, Times Staff Writer
The prosecutor who helped send DeWayne McKinney to prison on a murder charge -- and agreed to set him free nearly two decades later -- testified Wednesday that he was "likely" not a killer but couldn't be certain. Orange County Dist. Atty. Tony Rackauckas was a young prosecutor in 1982 when he persuaded a jury that McKinney, then a gang member, committed the execution-style killing of 19-year-old Walter Bell during a robbery two years earlier at a Chapman Avenue Burger King in Orange.
NATIONAL
December 23, 2003 | Josh Getlin, Times Staff Writer
As a midnight Monday deadline approached, more than 92% of the families eligible for aid from the Sept. 11 Victim Compensation Fund had come forward to request federal assistance, capping an unexpected surge of applications in recent weeks, program administrators said. The desire to settle -- and forgo the right to file lawsuits against the airlines and others -- means that the onslaught of litigation many had predicted after the terrorist attacks is unlikely to materialize.
NEWS
October 5, 2001 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. government has committed itself to paying full damages to the nearly 6,000 families who lost loved ones in the Sept. 11 attacks, an unprecedented move, legal experts say. Under a measure attached to the airline bailout bill, the government will compensate the families of those who died, as well as the more than 7,000 people who were injured, in the same way airlines pay damages related to deaths or injuries in a plane crash.
NEWS
November 20, 1994 | JOHN HURST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Tony Rigor was shot in the back two years ago, the bullet not only left him a quadriplegic but touched off a controversy over whether a felon can receive victim compensation funds from the state. Forced to use a wheelchair, Rigor, 28, applied for assistance from California's Victims of Crime Program. The agency pays out tens of millions of dollars to victims annually--$86 million to 100,000 people last year.
BUSINESS
March 17, 1988 | From Reuters
A. H. Robins Co. came another step closer to emerging from bankruptcy Wednesday when a federal judge approved the troubled drug maker's merger with American Home Products Corp. The approval was given only after last-minute negotiating in which the two companies--at the judge's suggestion--agreed to boost initial funding of the Dalkon Shield trust to $100 million from $10 million.
NEWS
July 11, 1987 | CARL INGRAM, Times Staff Writer
The state attorney general's office is protesting a state board's decision to make a prison convict serving a 208-year sentence for kidnaping and sexually abusing two young children eligible for up to $10,000 in assistance under a program for victims of violent crimes. The attorney general's office wants the the state Board of Control to reconsider its decision made last January to give an initial grant of $700 to Alex Cabarga, 22, and declare him eligible to apply for thousands more.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 1990 | JERRY HICKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Felony child molestation charges were abruptly dismissed Monday in the case of a Laguna Hills lawyer who was accused of using drugs to entice a 15-year-old boy to have sex with him. Despite protests from the boy's mother, Eric P. Lampel, 35, was allowed to plead no contest to a single misdemeanor charge of possession of drugs. He was ordered by Superior Court Judge Myron S.
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