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Victim Compensation

BUSINESS
March 17, 1988 | From Reuters
A. H. Robins Co. came another step closer to emerging from bankruptcy Wednesday when a federal judge approved the troubled drug maker's merger with American Home Products Corp. The approval was given only after last-minute negotiating in which the two companies--at the judge's suggestion--agreed to boost initial funding of the Dalkon Shield trust to $100 million from $10 million.
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NEWS
July 11, 1987 | CARL INGRAM, Times Staff Writer
The state attorney general's office is protesting a state board's decision to make a prison convict serving a 208-year sentence for kidnaping and sexually abusing two young children eligible for up to $10,000 in assistance under a program for victims of violent crimes. The attorney general's office wants the the state Board of Control to reconsider its decision made last January to give an initial grant of $700 to Alex Cabarga, 22, and declare him eligible to apply for thousands more.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 1990 | JERRY HICKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Felony child molestation charges were abruptly dismissed Monday in the case of a Laguna Hills lawyer who was accused of using drugs to entice a 15-year-old boy to have sex with him. Despite protests from the boy's mother, Eric P. Lampel, 35, was allowed to plead no contest to a single misdemeanor charge of possession of drugs. He was ordered by Superior Court Judge Myron S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 2006 | Jim Newton, Times Staff Writer
The trouble of the moment for Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa in his quest to be embraced by a multiracial city can be summed up in two reactions to the $2.7-million settlement first awarded to a black Los Angeles firefighter, then vetoed by the mayor. Monica Kazarian, a 29-year-old resident of Sherman Oaks, was appalled that the city would hand out that much money in the case. She welcomed Villaraigosa's veto.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 14, 1987 | FREDERICK M. MUIR, Times Staff Writer
Frank Emi is fighting for his rights. Again. The 70-year-old retired postal worker's latest challenge is to convince Congress that the internment that he and about 120,000 other Japanese-Americans suffered in detention camps during World War II should be redressed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 9, 1990 | MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal jury Thursday awarded $300,000 to a man who was shot in the back by a Newport Beach police officer, the second time in six months that the city will have to pay a substantial sum to a person shot by one of its officers. Ricky Patrick Miller, 28, was awarded $200,000 compensatory damages and $100,000 in punitive damages against Officer Jun Payoyo. Miller charged in his lawsuit that Payoyo acted negligently and violated his constitutional rights. Newport Beach City Atty.
NEWS
April 20, 1999 | JEFF LEEDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Deep in Los Angeles' underworld of con artists and stock swindlers, Rory Cypers rose to infamy as a telemarketer with a cold vacuum where his conscience should be. Authorities say he once threatened to sue a 78-year-old woman unless she invested $10,000 in his sham 900-number firm.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 16, 1999 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Innocent motorists and bystanders who are injured or killed because of reckless high-speed police chases cannot sue the police for their damages, under a ruling that the U.S. Supreme Court let stand on Monday. The justices turned away appeals from four Southern California accident victims who were badly injured when they were struck by cars fleeing the police.
BUSINESS
November 16, 2003 | Tom Petruno, Times Staff Writer
Some scandalous things have happened in the mutual fund industry. Now, what price should fund companies pay to make amends? The Securities and Exchange Commission took its first stab at answering that question last week, only to trigger cries of "Sellout!" from the agency's two principal state regulatory rivals.
NEWS
August 24, 1994 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For all you heirs of dispossessed Russian counts out there, wondering if you might someday get the old family estate back, the Justice Ministry sent a clear signal Tuesday: Don't hold your breath. The Kremlin had announced new procedures Monday for returning or paying for "illegally confiscated property," raising the prospect that Russia might go the way of much of Eastern Europe, giving back castles and farms to their pre-Soviet owners. But Deputy Justice Minister Anatoly M.
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