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Victim Compensation

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 2008 | Jean-Paul Renaud
The Board of Supervisors agreed Tuesday to pay a $437,000 settlement after doctors at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center removed a woman's uterus without her consent. Engrid Lewis was admitted to the public hospital in September 2006, suffering from fibroid tissue in her uterus, according to the settlement papers. Doctors gave her a range of options, including removal of her uterus. Lewis chose to have the affected tissue excised without removing her uterus. "While the county will argue that the proper medical treatment was to remove the patient's uterus, plaintiff will argue that the removal of her uterus was against her wishes," according to a case summary.
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BUSINESS
January 23, 2008 | David G. Savage, Times Staff Writer
The Supreme Court on Tuesday rejected a lawsuit from Enron Corp. investors who sought to recover more than $30 billion from Wall Street investment bankers who they alleged had schemed with the failed Houston energy trading firm. Without comment, the justices dismissed an appeal from pension and investment funds, including the University of California. The funds had argued that all the key players in the Enron debacle should be held liable for their losses.
WORLD
January 17, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
A court convicted Total SA in France's worst oil spill and ordered the petroleum giant and three other defendants to pay $285 million in compensation. It was the first time a French court awarded damages for environmental harm. The ruling found Total guilty of maritime pollution for transporting fuel in a rusty tanker that broke apart in a 1999 storm and stained 250 miles of coast with oil. Compensation was ordered paid to 101 civil parties, mainly associations involved in the cleanup and ecology groups.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 16, 2008 | John Spano, Times Staff Writer
Robert Blake, the actor acquitted of his wife's murder, should not have to pay her survivors a $30-million civil court award because he did not get a fair trial, his lawyers told appellate judges Tuesday. "All we asked for was a fair trial, and it wasn't," M. Gerald Schwartzbach argued to the state 2nd District Court of Appeal in Los Angeles. "Celebrities have the same rights as anybody else. . . . Mr. Blake was denied that." Attorney Eric J.
BUSINESS
December 20, 2007 | From Times Wire Services
After waiting two years for their share of the $225-million restitution fund tied to a $2.2-billion accounting scandal, 88,444 CA Inc. shareholders were told this week that they had to return about 20% of their payment because of a math error. And 2,000 shareholders mistakenly got no money. The U.S. District Court in Brooklyn said return of the overpayments was mandatory. The $59.2-million error was the result of a mistake by a firm working for the court-appointed fund administrator.
BUSINESS
November 9, 2007
Ford Motor Co. won reversal of a $60-million jury verdict awarded to the parents of a 17-year-old boy who was killed during the rollover of a 1996 Ford Explorer sport utility vehicle. The parents of Lance Hall claimed design defects in the Explorer left it unstable. A Miami jury in November 2005 awarded them $61 million, later reduced by $1 million by the trial court. A Florida appeals court erased the rest of the award, ordering a new trial.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 3, 2007 | From a Times Staff Writer
In a wrongful-death trial, a Ventura County jury awarded $12.5 million Friday to the family of a Thousand Oaks dental surgeon who was killed last year by an elderly motorist. On Sept. 16, 2006, Glenn Garvin, a 49-year-old endodontist, was riding a bicycle north on Westlake Boulevard when he was struck from behind by a Lexus that was being driven by Norma Seigel, 82. Seigel had been advised a month earlier that she should schedule surgery to have cataracts removed.
WORLD
November 1, 2007 | Tracy Wilkinson, Times Staff Writer
With a last-minute concession to the Roman Catholic Church, the Spanish parliament Wednesday passed a landmark bill that condemns the dictatorship of Gen. Francisco Franco and makes restitution to its victims. The legislation represents a groundbreaking attempt by Spain to come to terms with a dark and still-disputed chapter of its recent history.
BUSINESS
October 30, 2007 | From Times Wire Services
Chevron Corp. must pay $5.6 million to a former employee who sued over claims that she was retaliated against after complaining of harassment based on her gender and ethnicity. A federal jury in San Francisco decided Chevron must compensate Kiran Pande, a petroleum engineer who worked at the company for 15 years. She claimed to have reported her former supervisor for "sexist conduct." San Ramon, Calif.
WORLD
October 16, 2007 | Tina Susman, Times Staff Writer
In the days after Usama Abbass was shot dead in a Baghdad traffic circle by security guards working for Blackwater USA, his brother visited the U.S.-run National Iraqi Assistance Center seeking compensation. Like other Iraqis who have done the same, he learned a harsh truth: The center in Baghdad's Green Zone handles cases of Iraqis claiming death or damages due to military action, but not due to actions of private contractors such as Blackwater, who work in Iraq for the U.S.
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