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Victim Offender Reconciliation Program

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 13, 1996 | JEFF KASS
Police and a countywide social services agency are seeking volunteers to expand a counseling program for juveniles in Santa Ana involved in crimes ranging from petty theft to graffiti. The Victim-Offender Reconciliation Program, part of the Catholic-based St. Vincent de Paul Center social services program, has mediated between juvenile wrongdoers and their victims for eight years.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 13, 1996 | JEFF KASS
Police and a countywide social services agency are seeking volunteers to expand a counseling program for juveniles in Santa Ana involved in crimes ranging from petty theft to graffiti. The Victim-Offender Reconciliation Program, part of the Catholic-based St. Vincent de Paul Center social services program, has mediated between juvenile wrongdoers and their victims for eight years.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 8, 1993 | SHELBY GRAD
A teen-age "tagger" came face to face last week with the man whose property he vandalized with graffiti. The encounter began under a cloud of ambivalence and suspicion. But in the end, it produced something far more unusual in the relationship between lawbreaker and victim: mutual understanding. The two parties were brought together by the Victim Offender Reconciliation Program, a 5-year-old service designed to address the emotional toll of crime through talk instead of violence.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 8, 1993 | SHELBY GRAD
A teen-age "tagger" came face to face last week with the man whose property he vandalized with graffiti. The encounter began under a cloud of ambivalence and suspicion. But in the end, it produced something far more unusual in the relationship between lawbreaker and victim: mutual understanding. The two parties were brought together by the Victim Offender Reconciliation Program, a 5-year-old service designed to address the emotional toll of crime through talk instead of violence.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 21, 1992 | MARESA ARCHER
A program that brings victims of crimes face to face with their offenders will be able to expand the number of cases it can carry with new county funding. The Victim Offender Reconciliation Program, as it is called, recently received $64,500 from the county, according to Mike Niemeyer, program director. "Up until now, we've been funded 100% by the St. Vincent De Paul Society," Niemeyer said. "We've been handling about 30 cases a year; this new funding will let us handle 10 times that."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 1990 | TED JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Kim Ficzko sat next to a 15-year-old Orange boy and carefully told him the trouble she went through in September when he and others broke into her car, which was parked at her Anaheim apartment. "It was really brutal," she told him. "I felt angry and mad. "I thought, 'Who gave them the right to break into my car?' " This face-to-face meeting, Ficzko said, gave her the chance to calm her fears about the incident and restore some control in her life.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 29, 1988
An organizational meeting will be at Chapman College todayfor people interested in learning more about the Victim-Offender Reconciliation Program. The program provides mediation services in helping crime victims reach an acceptable restitution agreement with offenders who have been ordered to pay restitution in lieu of jail terms. The meeting will be at 7:30 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall at Chapman College, 333 N. Glassell St. For more information, call (714) 768-7531.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 13, 1999 | Jason Kandel, (714) 966-5848
The number of walls covered in graffiti has declined in Santa Ana since 1995, thanks to an aggressive effort to remove it, a graffiti task force recently reported to the City Council. The interagency task force was formed in 1993 to remove graffiti and prosecute the offenders. Lt. Mike Foote said that about 2.1 million square feet of graffiti was removed in 1998 at a cost of about $600,000.
NEWS
November 1, 1990
A local delicatessen is holding a benefit dinner for the Foothill Victim Offender Reconciliation Program. The Park Bench Deli, at 2470 N. Lake Avenue, will be open for a special dinner from 5 to 9 p.m. Saturday. Proprietor Tudor Lance said at least 30% of the evening's receipts will be donated to the church-sponsored program. VORP is a court-approved program in which victims and criminals meet face-to-face to discuss the offense and agree on restitution.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 1996 | MIMI KO CRUZ
More than a dozen public service agencies will share $1.8 million in federal funds during fiscal 1996-97 if the city receives the amount it anticipates for its Community Development Block Grant Program. In drawing up the budget for the coming fiscal year, the city designated federal funds for these nonprofit agencies: Meals on Wheels of Fullerton, Volunteer Center of Greater Orange County, Fullerton Interfaith Emergency Services, and Boys and Girls Club of Fullerton.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 21, 1992 | MARESA ARCHER
A program that brings victims of crimes face to face with their offenders will be able to expand the number of cases it can carry with new county funding. The Victim Offender Reconciliation Program, as it is called, recently received $64,500 from the county, according to Mike Niemeyer, program director. "Up until now, we've been funded 100% by the St. Vincent De Paul Society," Niemeyer said. "We've been handling about 30 cases a year; this new funding will let us handle 10 times that."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 1990 | TED JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Kim Ficzko sat next to a 15-year-old Orange boy and carefully told him the trouble she went through in September when he and others broke into her car, which was parked at her Anaheim apartment. "It was really brutal," she told him. "I felt angry and mad. "I thought, 'Who gave them the right to break into my car?' " This face-to-face meeting, Ficzko said, gave her the chance to calm her fears about the incident and restore some control in her life.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 15, 1991 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A parrot that was guaranteed not to fly that flew the coop. Three teen-age boys who tried to chop down an oak tree in a Thousand Oaks park. A teen-ager who accidentally burned a classmate with a firecracker. The disputes involving these parties could have gone to court, but they wound up instead in three community dispute resolution centers, which offer mediation without the cost and frustration of a court battle.
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